LINCOLN HISTORY LUNCH SERIES

Aging Partners invites senior citizens and the public to the Lincoln History Lunch Series at Gere Library, 2400 S. 56th St.  The presentations are from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., and highlight Lincoln’s history and evolution.  A sack lunch is available for a fee of $4 for age 60 and over, and an $8 fee for those under age 60.  Meal reservations must be made on the Monday prior to the program by calling 402-441-7158.  The schedule is as follows:

  • Wednesday, July 17 – “Lost Restaurants of Lincoln” with Jeff Korbelik, Lincoln Journal Star.  Lincoln has a history rich with delicious food and unique stories.  Long-time restaurant reviewer Korbelik remembers Lincoln’s most memorable eateries and shares his stories.
  • Wednesday, August 21 – “Historical Movie Theaters” with Ed Zimmer and Jim McKee.  Don’t miss this visual tour of Lincoln’s many historic theaters by two of Lincoln’s favorite historians.
  • Wednesday, September 18 – “John Johnson” with Ed Zimmer.  John Johnson was a Lincoln native, Lincoln High School graduate and University of Nebraska football player.  He also was a talented photographer who provides a unique view of early 20th century Lincoln, especially of Lincoln’s African-American community.

The Lincoln History Lunch Series is co-sponsored by Aging Partners and Lincoln City Libraries.  For more information on Aging Partners, visit aging.lincoln.ne.gov.

4 Reasons Why Independent or Assisted Living May Trump Living Alone

Last Updated: June 14, 2019

While remaining at home is the top choice for many, research from AARP and MetLife Mature Market Institute shows that it may not be the best option for the family budget, overall happiness or quality of life in our golden years.4 Reasons Why Independent or Assisted Living May Trump Living Alone

Many people don’t want to make the move into an independent or assisted living community and feel they lose their independence when they succumb to moving. But this simply isn’t true anymore, as baby boomers have reinvented assisted living. Learn more about how many independent and assisted living communities have expanded their market by providing convenience and retirement services and may trump living alone.

Why Independent or Assisted Living May Trump Living Alone

https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/4-reasons-why-independent-or-assisted-living-may-trump-living-alone/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=061719&utm_term=US%20Newsletter&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWldaa1pqVTJPVGhsTVdGayIsInQiOiJubU90T1piNEx1bGdXYlFhQ3MwUmE4Y3kzdzdvK29pekNYcDFRV2lPeFdzNXppSW1uTUkrYk8wXC9cL2JQN1poTzgwWWptNmRnSytJQlZ0WmZZK053elNSdWVHckNpK1djR0RRY2huaWF3d0hNNHNWTkxLNEEwTXQ0WFFhdXhOYkZiIn0%3D

8 Epic Wine Tours You Need To Take In Nebraska This Year

Sponsored by Nebraska Wine Tours Posted in Nebraska June 14, 2016

It seems many people are under the impression that you need a balmy Mediterranean climate to produce the best wine grapes. Those people must not have had the opportunity to taste Nebraska wines. Although our climate is temperamental and our growing season is shorter than in, say, Bordeaux, Nebraska soil produces some exceptional grapes.

Our grapes aren’t the same as those grown in France, Italy, or even Napa Valley. The distinct taste of a wine comes from the soil, the air, the sun, and the water where the grapes are grown as well as the variety of grape. Nebraska wines reflect our state’s unique growing conditions. They are quite literally unlike any other wines you’ll ever taste.

The first commercial winery in Nebraska since Prohibition has been operating since 1994. In the intervening two decades, approximately 30 more have opened their doors to share the fruits of their vines. If you’re curious to try these uniquely delicious libations (and why wouldn’t you be?), these eight wine tours, organized by Nebraska Wine Tours, put Nebraska wines within easy reach.

Right-Click here to open.

7 Gentle Exercises for Seniors With Arthritis

7 Gentle Exercises for Seniors With Arthritis

It may be hard for a senior to motivate themselves to exercise when they are experiencing an arthritis flare-up. However, according to the Arthritis Foundation, exercise may be the best way to improve your overall activity level and manage the pain.

Learn more about seven gentle exercises that you can pursue to improve your health and reduce your arthritis pain, without causing more stress to sensitive joints.

Before You Begin Exercising

All seniors should talk to their doctor before they begin a new exercise regime. Your doctor may want to test your cardiovascular health before you begin. They may also have valuable advice about exercises that are best for you considering your health conditions.

When you begin exercising, you should spend several minutes warming up whichever part of your body you are going to work – and be sure to exercise your left and right sides equally.

If at any time during exercise you feel pain, you should stop. Physiotherapists can help those who are struggling to exercise without pain.

Here are seven gentle exercises that you can pursue to reduce arthritis pain:

Arthritis in the Hands or Wrists

1. Fist Close: Maintaining finger flexibility is key for those with arthritis in the hands. This simple exercise can help. Simply ball your hand into a fist, slowly if it is challenging. Hold your hand in a fist for five seconds, or as long as you can. Release and repeat.

2. Wrist Bends: Some with arthritis find that their wrists get stuck or can’t bend as far as they need them too. This exercise can help, when practiced regularly. Place your elbow on a tabletop, with your hand pointing to the ceiling. Slowly push back your open palm with your other hand. Don’t push so hard you feel pain, but do try to go as far as you can. Hold for five seconds and release. Now push your hand forward, hold for five seconds and release.

3. Make an “O”: This last exercise may be a challenge if you have very serious arthritis, but it can also be very useful. Attempt to make an “O” shape with your hand. Hold your fingers together, bend your thumb, and gently try to touch your thumb to your index finger. You will get better at this exercise with time.

Arthritis in the Hips or Knees

4. Sitting Stretch: This exercise will gently move your hips and as a bonus, stretch your leg muscles. Sit on the floor with your legs extended in front of you. Slowly bend forward at the hips and reach for your feet. Most likely, you will not be able to reach very far at first, so don’t push yourself. Over time you will become more flexible.

5. Step-Ups: Gently bending your knee will help relieve pain. You don’t need special equipment to do this. Instead, find the nearest staircase. Hold on to the banister for balance, if necessary, and step one leg onto the bottom step, then the other. Move backward off the step and repeat.

Arthritis in the Ankles or Feet

6. Ankle Circles: Seniors may wish to hold onto the side of a chair, for balance, when they try this exercise. Stand up and raise one foot off the floor. Point your toe and draw a circle. This moves your ankle through its full range of motion. Draw five circles and then change direction. Be sure to do the other ankle too.

Arthritis in Multiple Areas

7. Swimming: It can be especially challenging to exercise when you have arthritis in multiple joints. One way to relieve pain and move all of these suffering joints is by swimming. Water takes the weight off all of your joints so you can move them further with less pain. If you can no longer swim, or don’t enjoy it, you can join water aerobic classes where you spend most of the time standing on the bottom of the pool.

It may be a challenge to adjust to a new exercise at first. However, seniors with arthritis have a lot to gain from trying a few gentle exercises a day.

How do you deal with your arthritis pain? Which gentle exercises are your favorite? We’d like to hear your suggestions in the comments below.

Related Articles:

7 Gentle Exercises for Seniors With Arthritis posted by Kimberley Fowler

YOUR MEDICARE RIGHTS AND PROTECTIONS

Did you know that Medicare has an ombudsman to help you resolve complaints you may have about your healthcare? Congress created the job of Medicare Beneficiary Ombudsman to assist people with Medicare with their inquiries, complaints, grievances, appeals, and requests for information. The Medicare Beneficiary Ombudsman also shares information with Congress, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, and other organizations about what works well and what doesn’t work well to improve the quality of the care you get through Medicare.

If you need help with a Medicare-related inquiry, there are several ways you can get help.

1. Call your plan. If your inquiry is related to your Medicare Advantage (Part C) plan or Medicare Prescription Drug (Part D) plan, contact your plan first using the phone number on your plan member ID card. Your plan is the best resource to resolve plan-related issues.

2. Call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048. If your concern is related to Original Medicare, or if your plan was unable to resolve your inquiry, contact 1-800-MEDICARE for help.

3. Contact the SHIP. The State Health Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIPs) provide free, high-quality counseling to people with Medicare regarding their benefits, coverage, appeals, and complaints. SHIP counselors are volunteers who often have Medicare themselves, so they know the issues and they’re not trying to sell you anything. Find your local SHIP at https://www.shiptacenter.org/

4. Contact the Medicare Beneficiary Ombudsman. If you have been unable to resolve your concern with your plan or 1-800-MEDICARE, ask a 1-800-MEDICARE representative to submit your complaint or inquiry to the Medicare Beneficiary Ombudsman. The Ombudsman will help to ensure that your inquiry is resolved appropriately.

May 2019 – FREE STOP THE BLEED CLASSES

Lincoln City Libraries will host four free Stop the Bleed training classes in May.  The courses coincide with Stop the Bleed Month, a nationwide campaign to highlight emergency first aid training.  Classes are limited to 20 participants each.  Call 401-441-8503 to register.   The training schedule is as follows:

  • Thursday, May 2, 6:30 p.m., Anderson Branch Library, 3635 Touzalin Avenue
  • Monday, May 6, 2 p.m., Eiseley Branch Library, 1530 Superior Street
  • Friday, May 17, 10:30 a.m., Walt Branch Library, 6701 S. 14th Street
  • Wednesday, May 22, 6:30 p.m., Gere Branch Library, 2400 S. 56th Street

According to the American College of Surgeons, citizen responders will almost always be first on the scene of an emergency medical situation, no matter how quickly professional emergency responders arrive.    Because an injured person can die from blood loss within minutes, those nearest to someone with life threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.

The training program is presented by the City of Lincoln Risk Management Division and Bryan Health.  Training is appropriate for teens and adults and lasts about an hour.

For information about Lincoln City Libraries and its resources, visit www.lincolnlibraries.org.   More information on Stop the Bleed is available at www.bleedingcontrol.org.

AGING PARTNERS EVENTS APRIL 8 THROUGH APRIL 14

SENIORS INVITED TO PARTICIPATE

Read this if you are a senior in Lincoln Nebraska.   Aging Partners invites senior citizens and the general public to attend a variety of senior-focused activities and classes in Lincoln and Lancaster County from April 8 through April 14:

Monday, April 8

  • Musical performance by The Clefs, Downtown Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Qigong Refresh and Recharge class, Cotner Center Condominium – 10 to 11 a.m.
  • BINGO, Firth Senior Center – 12:30 p.m.
  • 10-point Pitch, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Continuing 24 Form, Cotner Center Condominium – 1 to 1:30 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, Cotner Center Condominium – 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 3 to 4 p.m.

Tuesday, April 9

  • Learn to speak Spanish class, Downtown Senior Center – 9:30 a.m.
  • Chair Tai Chi, St. Paul United Methodist Church – 9:30 to 10:15 a.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, Auld Pavilion – 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, F Street Recreation Center – 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
  • Beginners 8 Form Tai Chi for Balance and Fall Prevention class, Auld Pavilion – 10:45 to 11:45 p.m.
  • 24 Form Tai Chi, F Street Recreation Center – 6 to 7 p.m.

Wednesday, April 10

  • Senior Walking Warriors, Hickman Senior Center – 9 to 9:30 a.m.
  • Senior Health Promotion UNMC Health Clinic, Vermeer Education Center – 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • Book Buddies, Downtown Senior Center – 9:30 a.m.
  • BINGO, Northeast Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Physical activity and exercise class, Asian Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • BINGO, Downtown Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • BINGO, JoAnn Maxey Senior Center – 11:30 a.m.
  • 10-Point Pitch and Bridge, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.
  • Chair Yoga, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 11

  • Qigong Refresh and Recharge class, Auld Pavilion – 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
  • Senior Health Promotion UNMC Health Clinic, Downtown Senior Center – 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • Writer’s workshop, Northeast Senior Center – 10 to 11 a.m.
  • Poetry reading and writer’s workshop with Carol Roland, Downtown Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • “Colorful Magic” with magician Bruce Jacoby, Bennet Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • Musical performance by Robert Patton and Nancy Vogt, Lake Street Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, F Street Recreation Center – 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
  • Musical performance by Mike McCracken and Pete Spotted Horse, Belmont Senior Center – 11 a.m.
  • Lincoln City Libraries Bookmobile visit, Lake Street Senior Center – noon to 1 p.m.
  • Stepping On – Building Confidence and Reducing Falls class, Eastmont Towers (Seasons) – 1 to 3 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church gymnasium – 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
  • “Dinner and a Show” featuring Hillbilly Hal Cottrell, Cotner Center Condominium – dinner at 5:30 p.m., show at 6:30 p.m. (call 402-441-7158 by April 9 for reservations)

Friday, April 12

  • Musical performance by Mike McCracken, Northeast Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Chair Yoga, East Lincoln Christian Church – 11 a.m. to noon
  • 10-point Pitch, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.

Senior Center Meal Schedule (reservations required two working days in advance):

Belmont Senior Center (402-441-7990):  Monday, Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon

Bennet Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon

Downtown Senior Center (402-441-7154):  Monday – Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Firth Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Mondays at 11:30 a.m.

Hickman Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m.

JoAnn Maxey Senior Center (402-441-7849): Wednesdays and Fridays at noon

Lake Street Senior Center (402-441-7157):  Monday – Friday at 11:30 a.m.

Northeast Senior Center (402-441-7151):  Monday – Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Waverly Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Fridays at 11:30 a.m.

Location addresses:

Asian Senior Center, 144 N. 44th St.

Auld Pavilion, 1650 Memorial Drive

Belmont Senior Center, 1234 Judson St.

Bennet Senior Center, 970 Monroe St.

Cotner Center Condominium, 1540 N. Cotner Blvd.

Downtown Senior Center, 1005 “O” St.

East Lincoln Christian Church, 7001 Edenton Road

Eastmont Towers (Seasons), 6305 “O” St.

Eastridge Presbyterian Church, 1135 Eastridge Drive

F Street Recreation Center, 1225 “F” St.

Firth Senior Center, 311 Nemaha St.

Hickman Senior Center, 115 Locust St.

JoAnn Maxey Senior Center, 2032 “U” St.

Lake Street Senior Center, 2400 S. 11th St.

Northeast Senior Center, 6310 Platte Ave.

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church, 8550 Pioneers Blvd.

St. Paul United Methodist Church, 1144 “M” St.

Vermeer Education Center, 4000 S. 84th St.

Waverly Senior Center, 14410 Folkestone St.

For information on classes or to register, call 402-441-7575.  Roundtrip transportation is available for senior center meals and activities in Lincoln only by calling the centers directly (phone numbers listed in meal schedule).  For more information on senior center events and activities, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: My Center News) or call 402-441-7158

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