Sunday, February 25th – African American Homesteader Town of DeWitty

Celebrate African American History Month and Learn About the African American Homesteader Town of DeWitty, Nebraska at Homestead National Monument of America

Artes Johnson, Chair of the Descendants of DeWitty, and Dr. William Hunt will present a program on the African American town of DeWitty, Nebraska at Homestead National Monument of America’s Education Center on Sunday, February 25, 2018 at 1:00 p.m., followed by a screening of the documentary film Frontier University Dreams at 2:00 p.m.

DeWitty, Nebraska was the longest-settled and most permanent African American homesteader town in the state of Nebraska. Established in 1907 by African American homesteaders in Cherry County, Nebraska, DeWitty provided shelter, education, and community for its residents until the last of them moved away in 1936. During a time of racial violence and discrimination in much of the rest of the United States, the residents of DeWitty and the residents of the nearby, predominately white town of Brownlee, lived as neighbors—working together and gathering regularly for baseball games and dances. In 2016, a historical roadside marker was erected by the Nebraska State Historical Society to remember this remarkable place. You can learn more of the incredible story of DeWitty at Homestead National Monument of America on February 25, 2018!

As always, programs at Homestead National Monument of America are free of charge and open to everyone.

Remember, Homestead National Monument of America has an exciting schedule of events planned for 2018. Keep up with the latest information by following us on Twitter (HomesteadNM) and Facebook (HomesteadNM).

Homestead National Monument of America is a unit of the National Park Service located four miles west of Beatrice, Nebraska and 45 miles south of Lincoln. Hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free of charge. For additional information, please call 402-223-3514 or visit http://www.nps.gov/home/.

Feb 16 – Art inspired by Japan, music, tea, snacks & origami  

 

Crane earrings
Reception
 
Friday February 16, 6-9 p.m.
One night only
Art inspired by Japan, music, tea, snacks & origami  
119 S. 9th St., Lincoln (9th &O)
402-475-1061
  • 7 artists – jewelry, sculpture, pottery and paintings inspired by Japan
  • Linda’s origami earrings, cards and art
  • Japanese tea ceremony by UNL Kawasaki Library
  • LNK New Music Collective performs original music
  • Origami taught by North Star High School students
sunrise_ beach and turquoise water_ art made from paper and origami by Linda Stephen
“Be at Peace, My Heart”
Paper art (chigiri-e and origami) by Linda Stephen $100 unframed, 10″ x 8.” See or buy at “Here Is My Heart” exhibit for Heart Health Month at Bryan Health.
Group Art Exhibition
February 1-28, open daily, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Bryan Medical Center
First floor, past information, near chapel
1600 S. 48th St., Lincoln, NE
If you are interested in purchasing artwork currently displayed in the Bryan Art Gallery, please contact Volunteers and Customer Care Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. at 402-481-3032. Proceeds support the Bryan Foundation.
 
Origami balloon hearts and young girl in spring. Artwork by Linda Stephen
“With Soaring Hearts”
Japanese papers and invented origami
$100 unframed, 10″ x 8″
For sale and to see at Bryan Medical Center through February for Heart Health Month.
Hope to see you at Friday’s reception!

For custom orders or colors for art or earrings, email Info@LindaStephen.com.
Wishing you joy in your days.

Facebook: LindaStephenOrigamiArt
Web site: LindaStephen.com

Linda Stephen Origami Art
LindaStephenLogoLandinginNebraskaOrigamiArt

Heritage – GOOD CONVERSATION: START BY ASKING GREAT QUESTIONS.

GREAT QUESTIONS from StoryCorp – https://storycorps.org/

Here are some of our suggestions for getting a good conversation going. We encourage you to use the ones you like and to come up with your own. This list is in no particular order. Choose one of the categories below, or scroll through and read them all.

6 Ways to Preserve Your Family’s Living Legacy

Posted On 31 Jan 2018 By : 

6 Ways to Preserve Your Family’s Living Legacy

Working on your family’s living legacy will not only provide your loved ones with a precious, tangible attachment to you after you are gone, but will also improve your level of happiness, life satisfaction and psychological well being.

Read our top six tips for preserving your living legacy:

1. Collect Family Recipes

2. Make an Audio or Video Recording

3. Make a Family Tree

4. Make a Family Time Capsule

5. Transcribe Favorite Memories

6. Sponsor a Park Bench or Tree

By March 30th – Seeking Nominees for Stroke – Courage Award

Nebraska State Stroke Association Seeks Nominees for Courage Award

The Nebraska State Stroke Association (NSSA) is seeking nominations for its Stephanie Wever Courage Award, which honors a Nebraska stroke survivor who exemplifies courage in overcoming the effects of stroke.

Stephanie Wever, a stroke survivor and former NSSA board member, died December 25, 2015, at age 32. She was dedicated to raising awareness of strokes and her rare gene defect, ACTA2.
Keith Fickenscher of Lincoln was the 2017 recipient.

The award will be presented in May during Stroke Awareness Month. For more information, contact NSSA at 402-484-8131 or hello@nebraskastroke.org.

The deadline for nominations is March 30. Nomination forms are at www.NebraskaStroke.org.

Or click here for download —> https://nebraskastroke.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Stephanie-Wever-Award-Nomination-Form-2018.pdf

 

About NSSA – Founded in 1985,  the Nebraska State Stroke Association is a private 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Our mission is to serve Nebraskans through stroke prevention, education, advocacy, and support services. www.NebraskaStroke.org.

The application for is easy.

Stephanie Wever Courage Award Nomination Form
Nominee’s Name: _____________________________________________________
Nominee’s City: _______________________________________________________
Name of Nominator (Organization or Individual): _____________________________
Phone Number of Nominator: ____________________________________________
Email of Nominator: ____________________________________________________
Address of Nominator: __________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________
Please include a nomination letter addressing some or all of the following (up to 800 words):

  •  Brief description of nominee’s experience with stroke
  •  Examples of the nominee’s courage or persistence in overcoming challenges related to stroke
  •  Explain why the nominee should be selected as a Stephanie Wever Courage Award recipient?
  •  If relevant, what volunteer work has the nominee done in support of other stroke survivors?

Parent / Guardian Name if Nominee is a Child: ______________________________
Parent / Guardian’s Address: ____________________________________________
Parent / Guardian’s Phone: ______________________________________________
Parent / Guardian’s Email: _______________________________________________

The 10 Healthiest Eating Habits You Can Adopt

Diets and food plans can be hard to stick to, and will not necessarily result in any long-term success. This is because people tend to slip back into their old habits very quickly, despite their best of intentions. The inevitable byproduct of these failures is feeling disheartened or demoralized, but healthy eating doesn’t need to be this way. Here are the 10 healthiest eating habits you can adopt (and stick to):

1. Stay Away From Processed Food
2. Make the Switch to Whole Grains
3. Use Healthy Cooking Methods
4. Watch Your Portion Sizes5. Be Aware of Healthy Options when you’re Eating Out –  includes:  Set aside half the dish and ask for it in a takeaway container.
 6. Keep a Food Diary

7. Eat Healthily at Social Events
8. Plan Your Healthy Shopping
9. You Can Have a Treat – Occasionally
10. Drink Lots of Water

COWBOY EXHIBITION JAN. 16

GREAT PLAINS ART MUSEUM TO OPEN COWBOY EXHIBITION JAN. 16

The rough-and-tumble icon of the American West is the subject of the newest exhibition at the Great Plains Art Museum.

“Cowboys from the Collection” will run Jan. 16 through April 28, with a special opening reception during Lincoln’s First Friday Art Walk from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 2, with food and drink.

WHEN: Jan. 16 through April 28

WHERE: Great Plains Art Museum, 1155 Q St.

IMAGES: Color images of a painting and photo are available at https://go.unl.edu/4co7. Cutline information is provided below.

Lincoln, Nebraska, Jan. 12, 2018 – The rough-and-tumble icon of the American West is the subject of the newest exhibition at the Great Plains Art Museum.

“Cowboys from the Collection” will run Jan. 16 through April 28, with a special opening reception during Lincoln’s First Friday Art Walk from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 2, with food and drink.

The exhibition features many iterations of the cowboy, ranging from portraits to action scenes. Photographs by L.A. Huffman, Charles W. Guildner and George Tuck capture working cowboys. Romanticized versions grace canvases by Olaf Wieghorst, Frank Tenney Johnson and Thomas Hart Benton and in bronzes by renowned cowboy artists Charles M. Russell and Frederic Remington. Even a cowboy president and a few cowgirls make appearances. In the Wunder Library on the mezzanine level, visitors can browse through the museum’s collection of Western novels.

“Drawing from some key works from the collection, there’s an opportunity to see the various ways in which cowboys have been depicted in art and popular culture over the last century,” said curator Melynda Seaton.

This exhibition was made possible via Humanities Nebraska and with the support of the Nebraska Arts Council and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment.

The Great Plains Art Museum, 1155 Q St., is open to the public 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is always free. Free guided tours are available. Please request tours via the museum’s website, https://go.unl.edu/plainsart, by completing the form.

# # #

PAINTING CUTLINE: “Pointing Them North” by Olaf Wieghorst, oil on canvas (Courtesy photo)

PHOTO CUTLINE: “Col. Theodore Roosevelt of the ‘Rough Riders’ after his return from Cuba,” Strohmeyer and Wyman, reproduced by Underwood and Underwood, stereoview, circa 1898 (Courtesy photo)

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