Archive for the ‘Volunteer Opportunities’ Category

8 Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits

Assisted living can be intimidating for grandkids — but these activities will make them feel right at home. Read tips from Grandparents.com.

Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits

Read tips from Sara Schwartz,  Managing Editor for Grandparents.com, on how to make grandkids more comfortable when they come to visit.

Read the Details at the links.

1. Read a chapter book.

2. Share a fuzzy blanket.

3. Create a scavenger hunt.

4. Peruse the family photo albums.

5. Give each other a manicure.

6. Hold a talent show.

7. Play a card game.

8. Start a movie club.

Source: 8 Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits

8 Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits posted by Sara Schwartz

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Walk to End Alzheimer’s RAISES OVER $163,000

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S®

Residents of Lincoln and surrounding areas joined the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s in the fight to end Alzheimer’s disease on September 17, 2017 at Holmes Lake in Lincoln. Over 1,400 participants raised more than $163,000 to fund Alzheimer’s care, support and research programs.

“Lincoln residents rallied together to show their dedication to ending Alzheimer’s disease at this year’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s,” said Erinn Drouin, Walk Director for the Alzheimer’s Association Nebraska Chapter. “Dedicated volunteers and businesses worked together to make this event special for all participants. The event was filled with poignant personal stories and energy to continue the fight to end this disease. This year, we welcomed a record number of participants and teams – we are so appreciative.”

Stanley Healthcare was the top fundraising team at this year’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s, raising over $11,000 to fund research and care and support services.

The event was generously sponsored by several local organizations and businesses, including Runza, Alpha Media, Channel 8 KLKN-TV, Carpetland, CountryHouse Residences, Legacy Retirement Communities – The Arbors, and Stanley Healthcare, among others. Free musical entertainment was provided by The Toons, and the event was emceed by Megan Conway of Channel 8 KLKN-TV. Lynne Fullerton, a local family caregiver, shared her personal story of how Alzheimer’s has impacted her and her family.

In Nebraska alone, there are more than 33,000 people living with the disease and 82,000 caregivers.  In the United States, more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in and the only disease among the top 10 causes that cannot be cured, prevented or even slowed. Additionally, more than 15 million family and friends provide care to people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Donations are being collected through December 15, 2017 at alz.org/walk.

Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s® – The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  Since 1989, the Alzheimer’s Association mobilized millions of Americans in the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk®; now the Alzheimer’s Association is continuing to lead the way with Walk to End Alzheimer’s.  Together, we can end Alzheimer’s – the nation’s sixth-leading cause of death.

Alzheimer’s Association® – The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s research, care and support.  Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. Visit alz.org® or call 800.272.3900.

Together, we can end Alzheimer’s. Donate here —>  Walk to End Alzheimer’s | Alzheimer’s Association

ActBlue — Watch the video — then chip in >>

Help Jane Raybould fight for you and your family.

Donate at the Source: ActBlue — Watch the video — then chip in >>

10 Ways Families Stay Connected When Caring for an Aging Parent

Whether you prefer the pen or phone, learn how you can harness the tools at your fingertips to keep your family connected to an aging parent.

Source: 10 Ways Families Stay Connected When Caring for an Aging Parent

Posted On 23 Aug 2017 . By : 

As many as 15% of caregivers must travel an hour or more when caring for an aging parent with dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association’s latest Facts and Figures report. Long-distance caregiving can lead to difficulties with communication, coordinating care and handling expenses, not to mention the emotional burden of caring for someone who lives far away. As a result, caregivers have had to come up with creative ways of addressing the problem of staying connected with their loved ones and coordinating with other family members.

 

9-17 – Walk with Nebraska Alzheimer’s Association

Walk to End Alzheimers – info. See below —

WHEN:            Sunday, September 17, 2017
11:00 AM Registration
12:30 PM Opening ceremony
1:00 PM Walk begins
WHERE:         Holmes Lake
HOW:              Register today. Sign up as a Team Captain, join a team or register to walk as an individual at alz.org/walk.
CONTACT:    Erinn Drouin, 402.502.4301, x. 8250, ehdrouin@alz.org

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S® 2017

 Over 1,200 Lincoln Residents are Raising Critically Needed Awareness and Funds

WHAT:  Over 1,200 Lincoln residents will join the fight to end Alzheimer’s disease at the 2017 Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s. In 2016, Lincoln raised over $184,000, contributing to more than 70 million raised nationwide for care, support and research efforts for those impacted by Alzheimer’s.

In addition to walking, participants will enjoy live entertainment, free food from Runza, and interaction with the following event sponsors:  Runza, Alpha Media, KLKN-TV, Carpetland, CountryHouse Residences, Legacy Retirement Communities – The Arbors, and Stanley Healthcare, among others.

Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Participants will learn more about Alzheimer’s disease, advocacy opportunities, clinical studies enrollment and support programs and services. Walk participants also honor those affected by Alzheimer’s disease with the poignant Promise Garden ceremony.

About the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s®  The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  Since 1989, the Alzheimer’s Association mobilized millions of Americans in the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk®; now the Alzheimer’s Association is continuing to lead the way with Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Together, we can end Alzheimer’s – the nation’s sixth-leading cause of death.

Alzheimer’s Association®  The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. Visit alz.org or call 800.272.3900.

Source: Nebraska Chapter | Alzheimer’s Association

Sept – Lincoln City Libraries – Facilities Planning

Lincoln City Libraries Seeks Public Input on Facilities Plan

Lincoln City Libraries (LCL) invites the public to attend meetings in September to provide input regarding the branch library facilities plan. The plan addresses the layout and design of each building and also considers how rearrangement and the reallocation of space, furnishings and technology will strengthen LCL’s ability to serve the community.

Sessions are scheduled at these locations:

Gere Branch, 2400 S. 56th Street, 6 p.m. Wednesday, September 6
Walt Branch, 6701 S. 14th Street, 3 p.m. Sunday, September 24
Eiseley Branch, 1530 Superior Street, 6 p.m. Tuesday, September 26
Anderson Branch, 3635 Touzalin Avenue, 6 p.m. Wednesday, September 27.

Input also may be sent to library@lincolnlibraries.org.

Source: Lincoln City Libraries | Lincoln, Nebraska

Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide 

This report lists and describes 10 ways to fight hate, cites examples of individuals and groups across the country tackling issues of intolerance, and provides a compilation of organizations and materials that can assist in the fight against hate.

Source: Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide | Racial Equity Resource Guide

  • 1. ACT Do something. In the face of hatred, apathy will be interpreted as acceptance — by the perpetrators, the public and, worse, the victims. Decent people must take action; if we don’t, hate persists. page 4
  • 2. UNITE Call a friend or coworker. Organize allies from churches, schools, clubs and other civic groups. Create a diverse coalition. Include children, police and the media. Gather ideas from everyone, and get everyone involved. page 6
  • 3. SUPPORT THE VICTIMS Hate crime victims are especially vulnerable, fearful and alone. If you’re a victim, report every incident — in detail — and ask for help. If you learn about a hate crime victim in your community, show support. Let victims know you care. Surround them with comfort and protection. page 8
  • 4. DO YOUR HOMEWORK An informed campaign improves its effectiveness. Determine if a hate group is involved, and research its symbols and agenda. Understand the difference between a hate crime and a bias incident. page 10
  • 5. CREATE AN ALTERNATIVE Do not attend a hate rally. Find another outlet for anger and frustration and for people’s desire to do something. Hold a unity rally or parade to draw media attention away from hate. page 12 3
  • 6. SPEAK UP Hate must be exposed and denounced. Help news organizations achieve balance and depth. Do not debate hate group members in conflict-driven forums. Instead, speak up in ways that draw attention away from hate, toward unity. page 14
  • 7. LOBBY LEADERS Elected officials and other community leaders can be important allies in the fight against hate. But some must overcome reluctance — and others, their own biases — before they’re able to take a stand. page 16
  • 8. LOOK LONG RANGE Promote tolerance and address bias before another hate crime can occur. Expand your community’s comfort zones so you can learn and live together. page 18
  • 9. TEACH TOLERANCE Bias is learned early, usually at home. Schools can offer lessons of tolerance and acceptance. Sponsor an “I Have a Dream” contest. Reach out to young people who may be susceptible to hate group propaganda and prejudice. page 20
  • 10. DIG DEEPER Look inside yourself for prejudices and stereotypes. Build your own cultural competency, then keep working to expose discrimination wherever it happens — in housing, employment, education and more. 
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