Archive for the ‘Volunteer Opportunities’ Category

Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide 

This report lists and describes 10 ways to fight hate, cites examples of individuals and groups across the country tackling issues of intolerance, and provides a compilation of organizations and materials that can assist in the fight against hate.

Source: Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide | Racial Equity Resource Guide

  • 1. ACT Do something. In the face of hatred, apathy will be interpreted as acceptance — by the perpetrators, the public and, worse, the victims. Decent people must take action; if we don’t, hate persists. page 4
  • 2. UNITE Call a friend or coworker. Organize allies from churches, schools, clubs and other civic groups. Create a diverse coalition. Include children, police and the media. Gather ideas from everyone, and get everyone involved. page 6
  • 3. SUPPORT THE VICTIMS Hate crime victims are especially vulnerable, fearful and alone. If you’re a victim, report every incident — in detail — and ask for help. If you learn about a hate crime victim in your community, show support. Let victims know you care. Surround them with comfort and protection. page 8
  • 4. DO YOUR HOMEWORK An informed campaign improves its effectiveness. Determine if a hate group is involved, and research its symbols and agenda. Understand the difference between a hate crime and a bias incident. page 10
  • 5. CREATE AN ALTERNATIVE Do not attend a hate rally. Find another outlet for anger and frustration and for people’s desire to do something. Hold a unity rally or parade to draw media attention away from hate. page 12 3
  • 6. SPEAK UP Hate must be exposed and denounced. Help news organizations achieve balance and depth. Do not debate hate group members in conflict-driven forums. Instead, speak up in ways that draw attention away from hate, toward unity. page 14
  • 7. LOBBY LEADERS Elected officials and other community leaders can be important allies in the fight against hate. But some must overcome reluctance — and others, their own biases — before they’re able to take a stand. page 16
  • 8. LOOK LONG RANGE Promote tolerance and address bias before another hate crime can occur. Expand your community’s comfort zones so you can learn and live together. page 18
  • 9. TEACH TOLERANCE Bias is learned early, usually at home. Schools can offer lessons of tolerance and acceptance. Sponsor an “I Have a Dream” contest. Reach out to young people who may be susceptible to hate group propaganda and prejudice. page 20
  • 10. DIG DEEPER Look inside yourself for prejudices and stereotypes. Build your own cultural competency, then keep working to expose discrimination wherever it happens — in housing, employment, education and more. 

Sunday August 6 – Photographing the Solar Eclipse Workshop

with Brad Goetsch

 At Homestead National Monument of America

Attention photographers of all skill levels! Learn how to make two and a half minutes in the shadow last forever.  Homestead National Monument of America will be hosting onSunday, August 6th at 2:00 pm a photography workshop by  Brad Goetsch.  This free workshop will focus on photographing the solar eclipse.  The program will be held at the Homestead Education Center.

Brad will share resources he has gathered and how to plan for photographing a total solar eclipse. Learn the “Where” “When” and “How” elements of photographing a solar eclipse as well.  This two hour session will include an indoor information portion and an outdoor hands on practice session at Homestead’s Education Center. Bring your gear to practice if you have it!

Homestead National Monument of America Superintendent Mark Engler shared, “This is a great hands on opportunity for the public to learn how to safely photograph the eclipse.  Photographing eclipses with a camera, or any device like a cell phone or tablet, without a proper filter could permanently damage a person’s eyes and camera.  This workshop will help people prepare ahead of time what they’ll need to safely photograph the eclipse.”

Brad will share information about equipment that he would use on the inexpensive side and also share what is out there for people dedicated to solar observation/photography, too.  To learn more information about Brad, photographing eclipses; gear and more visit this link to Brad’s website: http://www.bunkershotsphotography.com/the-great-american-eclipse

Remember, Homestead National Monument of America has an exciting schedule of events planned for 2017. Keep up with the latest information by following us on Twitter (HomesteadNM) and Facebook (HomesteadNM).

Homestead National Monument of America is a unit of the National Park Service located four miles west of Beatrice, Nebraska and 45 miles south of Lincoln. Hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free of charge. For additional information, please call 402-223-3514 or visit http://www.nps.gov/home/.

 

EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICATM

The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage.

Bunker Shots Photography

Source: Bunker Shots Photography | The Great American Eclipse

Aug 4 – OLLI Catalogs are online now

OLLI Happenings

Catalogs were mailed this week. Registration begins, Tuesday, Aug. 8. Check out the fall Term 1 catalog online

OLLI Open House

Join us for this party!Come join us at the OLLI open house on Sunday, August 20, 1:30-3 p.m., at the Lincoln Marriott Cornhusker Hotel, 333 S. 13th St. It’s free. Enjoy entertainment by Dan Holtz who celebrates and commemorates people, places and events in Nebraska history Continue reading…

Source: OLLI Friday Happenings | Announce | University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Imagine Cohousing…. | The Cohousing Association

Imagine Co-housing….

“Imagine that you live in a place where you know all your neighbors and they all look out for you. You often encounter a friend as you walk to or from your car. You are invited, daily, to join others for a meal or a fun visit. When you go on vacation everyone watches your house and it’s easy to find someone to water the plants or feed the cat. When you need a little extra help, you have friends and neighbors ready to pitch in. You have community support that enables elders to age-in-place and prolong the amount of time they can live at home. Children grow up free range with next door playmates and a safe place to roam.

“It’s called cohousing, also known as an intentional community. It is a small neighborhood where everyone who lives there agrees to be a good neighbor. You know your neighbors and you all agree to look out for each other. Design and Community make cohousing neighborhoods different from typical tract home developments. Almost all homes today are designed around the automobile. You pull into and out of your garage and rarely see your neighbor. People in today’s society do not know their neighbor and have little social interaction. Most homes have empty guest rooms and a garage full of equipment that rarely gets used. Living in a big cluttered house in isolation is expensive, unhealthy and a lot of work.

“Cohousing is designed so you have maximum opportunity to interact with your neighbors. Homes with front porches face each other and are grouped around common areas. You can see what is going on from your front window and you cross paths with neighbors as you walk to and from common shared amenities or parking. This type of design encourages community living with social gatherings and activities where you get to know your neighbor. Your home is private with a full kitchen and features similar to any other typical home. If you want solitude, your home is your private domain. If you want community, step outside. Participation is not mandatory; your level of community involvement is up to you.

“Cohousing involves shared resources. There is a common house, which has a kitchen where group meals can be prepared, storage sheds with equipment like step ladders and garden tools that you use when needed, but don’t have to store. Because of access to shared amenities, you can keep a smaller house with less clutter, less work and less expense. The people who live in community decide how to operate and manage themselves. There are no managers or rules imposed upon you. This is an environment where people have come together who are in agreement to be cooperative and a good neighbor. When there is conflict neighbors work together to resolve issues in a healthy way.”

Source: Imagine Cohousing…. | The Cohousing Association

Free Jazz – Summer Concert Series

Free Summer Concert Series
Live jazz music will be in the air throughout the summer in Lincoln, Nebraska thanks to James Terry and JazzTime Smooth Radio. He was recently encouraged when Governor Pete Ricketts proclaimed April 2017 as Jazz Appreciation Month just as plans were finalized for two free community concert series.
For the third consecutive year, Downtown Lincoln Association will follow in the tradition of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s, Jazz in June series with Tower Jazz. Starting, July 11, at Tower Square, 13th and P Street, free jazz concerts will be played on Tuesday evenings from 7 – 9 pm.
As part of the Lincoln Parks and Rec Department’s, Party in the Parks events, free concerts are also scheduled on Friday evenings from 7 – 9 pm, in July and August at Lincoln’s Union Plaza, located north of 21st and O Street. Partnering with Ryan Larsen, owner of Roots Music, the series will start on the First Friday, July 7 and run through August 25. Celebrating the diversity of the community a variety of music styles will be showcased.
ABOUT
James Terry provides the best in live jazz entertainment for local and regional events. He also owns JazzTime Smooth Radio, an internet radio station where jazz music can be enjoyed 24/7 at jazzztimessmoothradio.com. JazzTime Smooth Radio operates from the SCC Focus Suites, located at 285 South 68th Street Place in Lincoln.
For more information contact: James Terry/402-580-6983

Source: JazzTime Smooth Radio – index

Top 10 skills children learn from the arts – The Washington Post

Source: Top 10 skills children learn from the arts – The Washington Post

Full story is even better. -keith —–
Top 10 skills children learn from the arts
By Valerie Strauss January 22, 2013
1. Creativity
2. Confidence
3. Problem Solving
4. Perseverance
5. Focus
6. Non-Verbal Communication
7. Receiving Constructive Feedback
8. Collaboration
9. Dedication
10. Accountability.

Spring Maintenance for Senior Safety

However

  • Can they move around and negotiate the property safely?
  • Are they willing to allow outside help from a neighbor or service company when needed?
  • Is the work they are doing to keep the home up to date too exhausting?
  • Is the responsibility of spring maintenance overwhelming?
  • Are some important tasks being left undone?

Full story at the source: Spring Maintenance for Senior Safety

Good for the Body and Soul

Tending to gardens, clearing eaves and gutters, and cleaning windows are but a few of the strenuous tasks that are required for home maintenance. These chores are especially worrisome for adults with senior parents living on their own. But, if your parent(s) can take these tasks on, they should—performing them has a positive effect on the body and mind.

 

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