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Free books – Top 100 EBooks

Top 100 at Project Gutenberg

To determine the ranking we count the times each file gets downloaded. Both HTTP and FTP transfers are counted. Only transfers from ibiblio.org are counted as we have no access to our mirrors log files. Multiple downloads from the same IP address on the same day count as one download. IP addresses that download more than 100 files a day are considered robots and are not considered. Books made out of multiple files like most audio books are counted if any file is downloaded.

Top 100 EBooks yesterday

  1. A Christmas Carol in Prose; Being a Ghost Story of Christmas by Charles Dickens (2339)
  2. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (1161)
  3. The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People by Oscar Wilde (917)
  4. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (869)
  5. Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (712)
  6. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (707)
  7. Et dukkehjem. English by Henrik Ibsen (693)
  8. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (663)
  9. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (597)
  10. Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (584)
  11. Moby Dick; Or, The Whale by Herman Melville (519)
  12. Ulysses by James Joyce (505)
  13. The Book of the Fly by G. Hurlstone Hardy (500)
  14. Dracula by Bram Stoker (460)
  15. Il Principe. English by Niccolò Machiavelli (459)
  16. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle (452)
  17. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (450)
  18. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (443)
  19. Grimms’ Fairy Tales by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm (411)
  20. The Cottage on the Fells by H. De Vere Stacpoole (396)
  21. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (356)
  22. Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes (356)
  23. War and Peace by graf Leo Tolstoy (355)
  24. Beowulf: An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem (353)
  25. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (347)
  26. Emma by Jane Austen (346)
  27. The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (327)
  28. The Romance of Lust: A Classic Victorian erotic novel by Anonymous (324)
  29. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (323)
  30. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Frederick Douglass (319)
  31. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman (318)
  32. Jane Eyre: An Autobiography by Charlotte Brontë (303)
  33. Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus by Ludwig Wittgenstein (290)
  34. Gulliver’s Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World by Jonathan Swift (282)
  35. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë (275)
  36. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (273)
  37. Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie (270)
  38. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne (258)
  39. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving (253)
  40. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson (247)
  41. A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift (245)
  42. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo (245)
  43. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (240)
  44. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle (239)
  45. Pygmalion by Bernard Shaw (237)
  46. Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau (237)
  47. Prestuplenie i nakazanie. English by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (236)
  48. The Iliad by Homer (233)
  49. Sunzi bing fa. English by active 6th century B.C. Sunzi (233)
  50. The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana by Vatsyayana (232)
  51. Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton (231)
  52. The Girl’s Own Paper, Vol. XX, No. 989, December 10, 1898 by Various (231)
  53. Dubliners by James Joyce (226)
  54. A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle (224)
  55. The Count of Monte Cristo, Illustrated by Alexandre Dumas (218)
  56. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (215)
  57. Essays of Michel de Montaigne — Complete by Michel de Montaigne (203)
  58. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare (200)
  59. The Republic by Plato (200)
  60. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum (199)
  61. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells (199)
  62. The Dickens Country by Frederic George Kitton (197)
  63. The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois (195)
  64. Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson by Ralph Waldo Emerson (195)
  65. Common Sense by Thomas Paine (190)
  66. Beyond Good and Evil by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (187)
  67. The Awakening, and Selected Short Stories by Kate Chopin (186)
  68. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (185)
  69. Candide by Voltaire (184)
  70. The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie (177)
  71. Songs of Innocence, and Songs of Experience by William Blake (175)
  72. Hard Times by Charles Dickens (172)
  73. The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton and John Jay and James Madison (172)
  74. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe (171)
  75. The Divine Comedy by Dante, Illustrated by Dante Alighieri (170)
  76. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens (167)
  77. The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe (166)
  78. Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin (162)
  79. The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe (161)
  80. Anna Karenina by graf Leo Tolstoy (160)
  81. My Secret Life, Volumes I. to III. by Anonymous (159)
  82. The Man Behind the Bars by Winifred Louise Taylor (158)
  83. The King James Version of the Bible (149)
  84. Second Treatise of Government by John Locke (149)
  85. The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy (149)
  86. The Problems of Philosophy by Bertrand Russell (148)
  87. Pop-Guns by Aunt Fanny (147)
  88. Letters to a Friend by John Muir (144)
  89. The son of Don Juan by José Echegaray (142)
  90. Irrigation Works by E. S. Bellasis (142)
  91. Persuasion by Jane Austen (141)
  92. The Confessions of St. Augustine by Bishop of Hippo Saint Augustine (138)
  93. Mansfield Park by Jane Austen (137)
  94. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James (137)
  95. The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells (135)
  96. Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery (134)
  97. John Brown’s Raid by National Park Service (133)
  98. Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen (131)
  99. On Liberty by John Stuart Mill (130)
  100. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling (130)

Top 100 EBooks yesterday — Top 100 Authors yesterday — Top 100 EBooks last 7 days — Top 100 Authors last 7 days — Top 100 EBooks last 30 days — Top 100 Authors last 30 days

Downloaded Books
2017-12-05 119955
last 7 days 655133
last 30 days 3119305
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8 Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits

Assisted living can be intimidating for grandkids — but these activities will make them feel right at home. Read tips from Grandparents.com.

Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits

Read tips from Sara Schwartz,  Managing Editor for Grandparents.com, on how to make grandkids more comfortable when they come to visit.

Read the Details at the links.

1. Read a chapter book.

2. Share a fuzzy blanket.

3. Create a scavenger hunt.

4. Peruse the family photo albums.

5. Give each other a manicure.

6. Hold a talent show.

7. Play a card game.

8. Start a movie club.

Source: 8 Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits

8 Fun Activities for Grandkid Visits posted by Sara Schwartz

Walk to End Alzheimer’s RAISES OVER $163,000

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S®

Residents of Lincoln and surrounding areas joined the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s in the fight to end Alzheimer’s disease on September 17, 2017 at Holmes Lake in Lincoln. Over 1,400 participants raised more than $163,000 to fund Alzheimer’s care, support and research programs.

“Lincoln residents rallied together to show their dedication to ending Alzheimer’s disease at this year’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s,” said Erinn Drouin, Walk Director for the Alzheimer’s Association Nebraska Chapter. “Dedicated volunteers and businesses worked together to make this event special for all participants. The event was filled with poignant personal stories and energy to continue the fight to end this disease. This year, we welcomed a record number of participants and teams – we are so appreciative.”

Stanley Healthcare was the top fundraising team at this year’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s, raising over $11,000 to fund research and care and support services.

The event was generously sponsored by several local organizations and businesses, including Runza, Alpha Media, Channel 8 KLKN-TV, Carpetland, CountryHouse Residences, Legacy Retirement Communities – The Arbors, and Stanley Healthcare, among others. Free musical entertainment was provided by The Toons, and the event was emceed by Megan Conway of Channel 8 KLKN-TV. Lynne Fullerton, a local family caregiver, shared her personal story of how Alzheimer’s has impacted her and her family.

In Nebraska alone, there are more than 33,000 people living with the disease and 82,000 caregivers.  In the United States, more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in and the only disease among the top 10 causes that cannot be cured, prevented or even slowed. Additionally, more than 15 million family and friends provide care to people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Donations are being collected through December 15, 2017 at alz.org/walk.

Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s® – The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  Since 1989, the Alzheimer’s Association mobilized millions of Americans in the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk®; now the Alzheimer’s Association is continuing to lead the way with Walk to End Alzheimer’s.  Together, we can end Alzheimer’s – the nation’s sixth-leading cause of death.

Alzheimer’s Association® – The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s research, care and support.  Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. Visit alz.org® or call 800.272.3900.

Together, we can end Alzheimer’s. Donate here —>  Walk to End Alzheimer’s | Alzheimer’s Association

ActBlue — Watch the video — then chip in >>

Help Jane Raybould fight for you and your family.

Donate at the Source: ActBlue — Watch the video — then chip in >>

10 Ways Families Stay Connected When Caring for an Aging Parent

Whether you prefer the pen or phone, learn how you can harness the tools at your fingertips to keep your family connected to an aging parent.

Source: 10 Ways Families Stay Connected When Caring for an Aging Parent

Posted On 23 Aug 2017 . By : 

As many as 15% of caregivers must travel an hour or more when caring for an aging parent with dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association’s latest Facts and Figures report. Long-distance caregiving can lead to difficulties with communication, coordinating care and handling expenses, not to mention the emotional burden of caring for someone who lives far away. As a result, caregivers have had to come up with creative ways of addressing the problem of staying connected with their loved ones and coordinating with other family members.

 

Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide 

This report lists and describes 10 ways to fight hate, cites examples of individuals and groups across the country tackling issues of intolerance, and provides a compilation of organizations and materials that can assist in the fight against hate.

Source: Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide | Racial Equity Resource Guide

  • 1. ACT Do something. In the face of hatred, apathy will be interpreted as acceptance — by the perpetrators, the public and, worse, the victims. Decent people must take action; if we don’t, hate persists. page 4
  • 2. UNITE Call a friend or coworker. Organize allies from churches, schools, clubs and other civic groups. Create a diverse coalition. Include children, police and the media. Gather ideas from everyone, and get everyone involved. page 6
  • 3. SUPPORT THE VICTIMS Hate crime victims are especially vulnerable, fearful and alone. If you’re a victim, report every incident — in detail — and ask for help. If you learn about a hate crime victim in your community, show support. Let victims know you care. Surround them with comfort and protection. page 8
  • 4. DO YOUR HOMEWORK An informed campaign improves its effectiveness. Determine if a hate group is involved, and research its symbols and agenda. Understand the difference between a hate crime and a bias incident. page 10
  • 5. CREATE AN ALTERNATIVE Do not attend a hate rally. Find another outlet for anger and frustration and for people’s desire to do something. Hold a unity rally or parade to draw media attention away from hate. page 12 3
  • 6. SPEAK UP Hate must be exposed and denounced. Help news organizations achieve balance and depth. Do not debate hate group members in conflict-driven forums. Instead, speak up in ways that draw attention away from hate, toward unity. page 14
  • 7. LOBBY LEADERS Elected officials and other community leaders can be important allies in the fight against hate. But some must overcome reluctance — and others, their own biases — before they’re able to take a stand. page 16
  • 8. LOOK LONG RANGE Promote tolerance and address bias before another hate crime can occur. Expand your community’s comfort zones so you can learn and live together. page 18
  • 9. TEACH TOLERANCE Bias is learned early, usually at home. Schools can offer lessons of tolerance and acceptance. Sponsor an “I Have a Dream” contest. Reach out to young people who may be susceptible to hate group propaganda and prejudice. page 20
  • 10. DIG DEEPER Look inside yourself for prejudices and stereotypes. Build your own cultural competency, then keep working to expose discrimination wherever it happens — in housing, employment, education and more. 

Sunday August 6 – Photographing the Solar Eclipse Workshop

with Brad Goetsch

 At Homestead National Monument of America

Attention photographers of all skill levels! Learn how to make two and a half minutes in the shadow last forever.  Homestead National Monument of America will be hosting onSunday, August 6th at 2:00 pm a photography workshop by  Brad Goetsch.  This free workshop will focus on photographing the solar eclipse.  The program will be held at the Homestead Education Center.

Brad will share resources he has gathered and how to plan for photographing a total solar eclipse. Learn the “Where” “When” and “How” elements of photographing a solar eclipse as well.  This two hour session will include an indoor information portion and an outdoor hands on practice session at Homestead’s Education Center. Bring your gear to practice if you have it!

Homestead National Monument of America Superintendent Mark Engler shared, “This is a great hands on opportunity for the public to learn how to safely photograph the eclipse.  Photographing eclipses with a camera, or any device like a cell phone or tablet, without a proper filter could permanently damage a person’s eyes and camera.  This workshop will help people prepare ahead of time what they’ll need to safely photograph the eclipse.”

Brad will share information about equipment that he would use on the inexpensive side and also share what is out there for people dedicated to solar observation/photography, too.  To learn more information about Brad, photographing eclipses; gear and more visit this link to Brad’s website: http://www.bunkershotsphotography.com/the-great-american-eclipse

Remember, Homestead National Monument of America has an exciting schedule of events planned for 2017. Keep up with the latest information by following us on Twitter (HomesteadNM) and Facebook (HomesteadNM).

Homestead National Monument of America is a unit of the National Park Service located four miles west of Beatrice, Nebraska and 45 miles south of Lincoln. Hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free of charge. For additional information, please call 402-223-3514 or visit http://www.nps.gov/home/.

 

EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICATM

The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage.

Bunker Shots Photography

Source: Bunker Shots Photography | The Great American Eclipse

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