Archive for the ‘Senior Topics’ Category

Most Living Wills Don’t Help You Plan for Dementia Care

Most Living Wills Don’t Help You Plan for Dementia Care, This One Does Posted On 12 Apr 2018 By : 
 We all know we’re supposed to have a living will so our doctors and families will know what type of care we want (and don’t want) if we can’t decide for ourselves. For about a third of us, though, dementia will present a problem a traditional living will can’t solve. That’s because most living wills — also known as advance directives — only take effect after a catastrophic sudden change in your cognitive abilities, like a serious accident or stroke.

Most Living Wills Don't Help You Plan for Dementia Care, This One Does

Dementia, however, affects decision-making in slower, more subtle ways, leaving patients competent to make simple choices but often overwhelmed by major decisions about treatment options.
A New Living Will for Dementia Care

(…) Each stage has four options for dementia care:

  1. To exclude the use of breathing machines and resuscitation.
  2. To prolong life as long as possible.
  3. To receive care only at home
  4. To receive palliative care only.
Developing a Health Directive for Dementia

(…) Gaster said age 65-70 is the ideal time to make your care choices, fill out the form and sign it.
(…) Gaster recommends the Alzheimer’s planning tools created by the Conversation Project,

Ways to Talk About Dementia Care Planning With Your Loved Ones

(…) talking about the possibility of dementia and planning for it can make the difference between a good end of life and one that’s unnecessarily painful and stressful for the whole family.
(…) thousands of people who’ve downloaded the dementia directive online.

Related Articles:

We Can Help! Our local advisors can help your family make a confident decision about senior living.

Call: 866-333-2174

Hip Replacement Surgery Dos and Don’ts: 

Posted On 07 May 2018 By : 

Summary only – Hip replacement surgery is one of the most common orthopedic procedures with over 300,000 surgeries done each year. The best piece of advice we can give you before your surgery is to be prepared. If you know what to do and what to not do, you can speed up your healing time and will soon be lacing up your running shoes once again.

Hip Replacement Surgery Dos and Don'ts: What You Need to Know Before Your Surgery

Hip Replacement Surgery Dos and Don’ts

Learn more about what you need to do to have a successful recovery from your hip replacement surgery:

DON’T: Do It Alone

DO: Eat for Healing

DO: Know What is Normal and Have Realistic Expectations

DO: Manage Your Pain

DO: Plan to Move

Read full story… https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/hip-replacement-surgery-dos-and-donts/

Aug 28 – Helen’s Musical Hats!

Helen’s Musical Hats! Show has been selected as a stage entertainer for the 5th year at the 2018 Nebraska State Fair. Helen Waring Johnson will be performing on the Open Class Stage in the Fonner Park Grandstand Concourse on:

  • Tues., Aug. 28th 3 Shows: 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM, 2:25 PM – 3:00 PM, and 5:15 PM – 6:00 PM.
  • Thur., Aug. 30th 4 Shows: at: 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM, 12:30 PM- 1:15 PM, 4:30 PM – 5:15 PM and 6:00 PM – 6:45 PM.

Medicare can help with cataracts 

Greg Dill
Greg Dill

Cataracts often come with age and can affect your vision. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. New eyeglasses, brighter lighting, antiglare sunglasses, or magnifying lenses may help your symptoms. If not, you may need surgery.

What else??? http://www.seniorspectrumnewspaper.com/newspaper/08_18/Greg_Dill.htm

9 Questions That Will Help Strengthen Your Relationship

Read Full text at the link.

Dr. Susan Edelman is a psychiatrist and associate professor of sociology at Stanford University who, like many others, believes that communication is the key to a long and stable relationship. What distinguishes her from other experts in this field is her focus on questions and not just any…

Dr. Edelman argues that not every type of conversation and any kind of question contributes to strengthening the relationship because it is not always easy to explore sensitive topics in depth or to find out what our partners think without being perceived as snooping or critical. She, therefore, suggests using the 9 questions below, which will help you get to know your partner in depth and make it easy for them to open up to you. If you use them regularly and adjust the way you relate to the spirit of these questions, you will have a strong relationship in which you can talk about everything and raise important issues without fear.

1. What do you find hard to share with me?
2. What are the five things that you’re happiest for right now?
3. How do you see our relationship?
4. How’s your relationship with your family?
5. What achievement made you feel proud?
6. What is your worst memory?
7. What would you change about yourself?
8. What was the last thing you cried about?
9. What does your perfect day look like?

full text —> http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=30438

The Importance of Elder Empowerment

Posted On 19 Jun 2018  By : 

In a traditional senior care setting, schedules are a way of life. There are specific times for when to get up, when to go to bed, when to have activities, exercise and have meals. For seniors who spent their entire adulthood living independently and making their own choices, the cultural shock can be considerable. (…) Read more by using the link below.

An Elder-Directed Environment

Green House communities, which follow the model established by The Green House Project, buck the traditional senior care model by putting elder decision-making at the heart of all they do. “We push the envelope by looking at the elder voice and learning how to access it, and also by determining what mechanics need to put in place to ensure the model is elder-directed,” says Wiegand.

The Green House model facilitates elder-directed lifestyles by creating a more intimate, residential environment. Each Green House home accommodates between 10 and 12 elders, as opposed to the environment of a traditional senior living model that typically has 100 residents or more.

https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/the-importance-of-elder-empowerment/

 

What if I refused to pick Mom up from the hospital?

My mom is a serious alcoholic. 76 years old but more like 90. She lives in my neighborhood, not my home. I am an only child and there is NO other family around, period. I was out of town for 2 days in March and she had a panic attack and called 911, admitted to the hospital for a couple of days. In April she spent 10 days in a senior mental health/detox facility. Took a bad fall in May, hit her head, I called 911. She was admitted to the hospital for a couple of days. I begged for the hospital not to release her but they did. She took another fall last week and twisted up her foot. She refuses to discuss any other living arrangement (I will not have her live with me – she is verbally abusive and nasty) and mentions suicide on a regular basis (this has been going on for years and yes I’ve informed ALL of the doctors). If she is hospitalized again, can I refuse to pick her up?

See aq discussion –

https://preview.agingcare.com/questions/what-if-i-refused-to-pick-her-up-from-the-hospital-440244.htm?utm_source=APFMnewsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=July+7%2C+2018&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWlRNME9EQTRabVJoTmpsaiIsInQiOiJjeFNGVTdCXC9oNERmOUNJTmwrbWpMWVJJRGlBc2t2dTlcL0luM1BwZUx6WDBcL05IaUVZclFsb0pNSGJEYWd0T2dVYWRTZUZRWXFBU3ZBMmpHTitXTmJ2enkxNStuTU56cmk0QnNqY0lFQmlXNmZiUVwvRUpUZVJZOTdNQ3Jidk1NYkMifQ%3D%3D

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