Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Health Tips for the Summer Season

By Dr. Tony Sun, Chief Medical Officer, UnitedHealthcare of Nebraska

Summer is here, providing an ideal time for people in Nebraska to get active. While some people may talk about getting a “beach body,” fitness is more than just a matter of aesthetics – it can mean the difference between a long life and premature death.

Studies show 80 percent or more of premature chronic conditions, such as heart attack, stroke or diabetes, are caused by modifiable lifestyle choices, as opposed to being caused by genetic factors. Yet, many Americans lack an understanding of the connection between lifestyle choices and chronic health conditions. A recent UnitedHealthcare survey found that just 16 percent of Americans correctly recognized that 80 percent or more of premature chronic conditions are caused by modifiable lifestyle choices, such as risk factors like smoking or obesity, not genetics.

To help make fitness a priority this summer, here are tips to consider:

Walk This Way: Studies have shown walking more and sitting less may help people maintain a healthier weight, ward off depression and prevent serious health issues like heart disease. And a recent report concluded that walking can help curb sweet cravings, boost the immune system and ease joint pain. To make walking more effective, think FIT, which stands for frequency (500 steps within seven minutes six times per day), intensity (3,000 steps within 30 minutes each day) and tenacity (at least 10,000 total steps per day).

Get Outside (Safely): The popularity of smartphones and streaming TV has made it easy – and entertaining – to stay inside. In fact, recent research has found that some people spend 90 percent of their time indoors, limiting exposure to daylight and fresh air. This can have negative consequences, including for children and their eye health. Studies have found that exposure to outdoor light may help reduce the risk of nearsightedness, the inability to see far off objects clearly. To gain the potential benefits of being outdoors while helping stay safe, children and adults should wear sunglasses that block both UV rays and blue light, as well as apply sunscreen to help reduce the risk of skin cancer.

 Maintain Your Hearing Health: Summer is a popular time for sporting events and music concerts, which can lead to exposure to loud sounds. Crowd noise at sporting events can exceed 90 decibels, while music concerts can reach 110 decibels. Prolonged exposure to sounds above 85 decibels can contribute to gradual hearing loss, so it is a good idea to use ear protection when seeing your favorite team or band. Likewise, extended listening to music or digital content through headphones or earbuds may damage hearing overtime. To help prevent that, turn the volume on your electronic device to 60 percent and listen for no longer than 60 minutes at a time, and never listen to earbuds while using power tools or a lawn mower.

 Stay Safe Overseas: With people heading out on summer vacations, it is important to recognize that up to 20 percent of travelers suffer an illness or injury while on vacation. Before traveling out of your home state, review your health plan and understand what it covers, including if you have access to a national or local network of hospitals and health care providers. For people traveling overseas, contact your primary care doctor or travel medicine clinic to determine what pre-screenings or immunizations might be recommended or required, based on your health history and countries on the itinerary.

Following these tips may help you focus on fun, friends and family during the summer, while helping maintain or improve your health now and in the future.

 

 

8 Habits to Help Reduce Arthritis Symptoms

According to the Center for Disease Control & Prevention, 54 million adult Americans suffer from arthritis. It’s not just the one disease either, but rather a collection of 100 conditions that affect the joints, causing stiffness, swelling, and pain. Though you can’t always prevent it, there are some things you can do to help reduce your arthritis symptoms if you have it. Below you’ll find 8 of them!

For details click here —> http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=29741

Summary only
1. Keep Your Weight in Check
2. Sip Green Tea

3. Drink Baking Soda – Recent research suggests that a daily dose of water and baking soda can help to combat inflammatory diseases.

4. Run a Little – Pounding the sidewalk surprisingly helps to protect joints, most likely because the activity helps people to maintain a healthy weight.

6. Eat a Rainbow

7. Schedule Workouts

8. Set a Bedtime

TECHNIQUE DOUBLES CONVERSION OF CO2 TO PLASTIC COMPONENT

Very exciting news unless there are unintended consequences. “The conversion of CO2 is very important to help offset the emissions that lead to global warming
TECHNIQUE DOUBLES CONVERSION OF CO2 TO PLASTIC COMPONENT
Lincoln, Nebraska, May 22, 2018 – Fossil fuels have long been the precursor to plastic, but new research from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and European collaborators could help send that era up in smoke — carbon dioxide, to be exact.
Produced almost entirely from burning fossil fuels, carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere have risen from 280 parts per million in the pre-industrial era to about 410 PPM today. That trend, combined with the finite supply of fossil fuels, has pushed researchers to explore methods for producing plastic from CO2 rather than petroleum or natural gas — recycling CO2 just as plastic is now.
“The conversion of CO2 is very important to help offset the emissions that lead to global warming and other detrimental processes in the environment,” said Alexandrov, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

More —> https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/technique-doubles-conversion-of-co2-to-plastic-component/

How to Distinguish Between Alzheimer’s and Aging

Our memory capacity changes as we get older, but memory loss that adversely affects everyday life is not an ordinary sign of aging and may actually be a symptom of the onset of dementia. This phenomenon causes a slow deterioration of memory, reasoning, and logic, with the most common type known as “Alzheimer’s” – a serious disease that disrupts the functioning of brain cells and even stops their activity.
  • Changes in memory caused by old age will be related to the names of people or places, but changes caused by Alzheimer’s are expressed through forgetfulness that severely affects one’s ability to work and even engage in a social life and hobbies.

Brain Cells Keep on Growing, Even in the Elderly…

While many people assume that brain cells are gone forever once dead, new research has now revealed that humans actually continue to produce them long throughout adulthood, and their findings may have a significant impact on the way diseases like Alzheimer’s are treated.

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM LAWS AN ALL-AMERICAN DISPUTE,

Lincoln, Nebraska, March 5, 2018 – A Colorado baker’s refusal to make a wedding cake for a gay couple is so divisive that it has made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Following legalization of same-sex marriage, some states have passed laws that allow business owners to refuse services to same-sex couples based upon religious belief.
Yet new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln indicates that most Nebraskans – 64 percent of nearly 1,100 survey respondents – oppose such laws. The results mirror national polls that have shown religious freedom laws lack broad support among Americans.
Sociologists Emily Kazyak and Kelsy Burke analyzed responses to why Nebraskans support or oppose a business owner’s right to refuse service to gays and lesbians to gain insight into why these laws continue to gain traction in state Legislatures even though most Americans do not actually agree with them.  Mathew Stange, who received his doctoral degree in survey research and methodology at Nebraska and is now a survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, also participated in the study.
They found that both sides base their appeals upon bedrock American values of freedom and capitalism.
Those who side with the baker say he has the right to act upon his religious convictions and that free enterprise means that plenty of other bakers would serve the couple. Those who side with the couple say they have the right to be free from discrimination and that free enterprise demands that all customers be served.
Kazyak said both sides share the belief that Americans have a fundamental right to freely live their lives.
“The disagreement is not over the value of freedom or equality per se,” she said. “It’s over the questions of whose rights are most worthy of protection and whose freedom is potentially jeopardized in the current moment.”
The researchers noted that as LGBTQ people have gained acceptance and visibility, conservative Christians have begun to portray themselves as a group under threat.
“Protestant Christians have always been the dominant religious group in America, yet evangelical Protestant legislators are now leading efforts to pass these religious freedom laws,” Burke said. “They are thus sending a clear message that they believe their religious beliefs are under threat.”
The Supreme Court, which heard arguments in the Colorado case in December, is expected to rule on the matter by June.
The study was based on data collected by the 2015 Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey. NASIS is an annual cross-sectional omnibus survey of Nebraskans 19 and older, conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research at Nebraska.
Findings were published online Feb. 28 in Socius, a  research journal of the American Sociological Association.

Lincoln’s self-driving system in downtown

 

Lincoln is one of 35 Champion Cities chosen to develop a self-driving micro-transit system in downtown.  

 

Bloomberg Philanthropies has named Lincoln as one of 35 Champion Cities for its idea to develop a self-driving micro-transit system in downtown.  Mayor Chris Beutler and others involved in the proposed project will discuss the award and the next steps at a news conference at 9:30 a.m. Friday, February 23 in Room 303, County City Building, 555 S. 10th Street.

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 555 S. 10th Street, Lincoln, NE

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