Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION LAUNCHES COMPREHENSIVE DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS
Recommendations Emphasize High Quality, Person-Centered Care in Long-Term and Community-Based
OMAHA, January 19, 2018 – Yesterday, the Alzheimer’s Association released new dementia care practice recommendations aimed at helping nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and other long-term care and community care providers deliver optimal quality, person-centered care for those living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. The recommendations are posted online today and will be published as a supplement to the February issue of The Gerontologist.
The Alzheimer’s Association 2018 Dementia Care Practice Recommendations outline 56 recommendations across 10 content areas, grounded in the fundamentals of person-centered care. They were developed by 27 dementia care experts convened by the Alzheimer’s Association and are based on a comprehensive review of current evidence, best practice, and expert opinion.
The recommendations seek to better define quality care across all care settings, and throughout the disease course. They are intended for professional care providers who work with individuals living with dementia and their families in long-term and community-based care settings.
“Since its inception, the Alzheimer’s Association has been a leader in outlining principles and practices of quality care for individuals living with dementia,” said Sam Fazio, Ph.D., lead author and Director of Quality Care and Psychosocial Research, Alzheimer’s Association. “These recommendations reflect the most current research and best practices to help ensure high-quality, person-centered care for people living with Alzheimer’s in long-term and community-based settings.”
It is estimated that nearly 60 percent of older adults with Alzheimer’s or other dementias reside in the community (outside a hospital or clinical setting). About 25 percent of these individuals live alone, but the remainder receives care from family members, unpaid caregivers, and community-based and residential care providers. By age 80, 75 percent of people with Alzheimer’s dementia are admitted to a nursing home. The new recommendations are aimed at guiding care in these settings.
In addition to updating and enhancing previous recommendations in areas familiar to the dementia care community, the recommendations break important new ground. Most notably, the recommendations offer guidance to community-based and residential care providers on detection and diagnosis and ongoing medical management — topic areas typically reserved for clinicians. Recommendations in these two areas are written specifically for non-physician care providers and address what these providers can do to help with these important aspects of holistic, person-centered dementia care.
“Detection and diagnosis, and medical management are critical, vital areas of care. While clinicians must continue to take a lead role in these areas, there are important contributions dementia care providers can make to improve outcomes in these areas,” Fazio said. “Our recommendations outline appropriate actions dementia care providers can make to complement and enhance the work clinicians are doing. Having both groups focus on these critical areas will result in better care for people struggling with this disease.”
Other areas covered by the recommendations include:
  • Fundamentals of person-centered care
  • Assessment and care planning
  • Information, education and support
  • Ongoing care for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia
  • Support of activities in daily living
  • Staffing
  • Supportive and therapeutic environments
The 56 recommendations are detailed in 10 area-specific articles published in the February supplement. In addition to providing greater details about each recommendation, the articles provide evidence and expert opinion supporting each recommendation. All 10 articles and an overview article summarizing all the recommendations appear online for the first time yesterday.
The Alzheimer’s Association will share the recommendations with policymakers and the dementia care community formally during a Capitol Hill event on February 14 with special guest remarks by Senator Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.).  Dementia care experts who developed the recommendations will provide deeper context and explanation behind the new recommendations.
There are an estimated 5.5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease today. It is the sixth-leading cause of death, and the only disease among the top 10 causes of death that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s is projected to reach nearly 14 million by 2050, unless more effective treatments are advanced. For more information on the recommendations, visit alz.org/practicerecommendations.
Alzheimer’s Association®
The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit alz.org.
The Alzheimer’s Association Nebraska Chapter serves all 93 counties in Nebraska.  In addition to offering free education and support services, the Chapter also raises money for local and national research efforts through the Walk to End Alzheimer’s and The Longest Day events.  Staff and volunteers also work together to encourage state legislators to make Alzheimer’s disease a priority in the state by increasing funding for the disease.

See – https://www.alz.org/nebraska/

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10 Facts About Senior Living

That Will Surprise You

10 Facts About Senior Living That Will Surprise You

 

Fact #1: “80 is the new 65.”

Fact #2: The need for diverse eldercare is skyrocketing.

Fact #3: The typical assisted living resident is an independent female.

Fact #4: Specialized eldercare is on the rise.

Fact #5: Skilled nursing facilities are the most expensive care option – and may not be sustainable.

Fact #6: Seniors and their families are not prepared for the costs of long-term care.

Fact #7: Community and home-based care are on the rise.

Fact #8: Owning your own home may not make the most financial sense.

Fact #9: Many seniors avoid advanced care planning.

Fact #10: Staying active is the best prevention, even if you’ve been inactive all your life.

 Too Much Screen Time Hinders Health of Kids AND Seniors  

You’ve probably heard about the importance of limiting the amount of time kids spend watching TV, being on the computer or playing video games to ensure they get enough physical activity and limit the barrage of junk food marketing on TV that influences them. In general, too much sedentary behavior affects everyone’s health, but for older adults, it can not only negatively impact their physical health and hinder mobility, but their social/emotional health as well.   Aging Partners interviewed PHL President, Dr. Bob Rauner about the effects of too much screen time on senior health for  the Winter 2018 edition of Living Well magazine.  Read or download Living Well here.

For Seniors, Any Physical Activity Is Better Than None

HealthDay news image .  FRIDAY, Nov. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) —

Don’t try saying you’re too or too busy to exercise, especially after that calorie-laden Thanksgiving dinner. Any level of physical activity can reduce seniors’ risk of heart disease, researchers report.
The 18-year study included more than 24,000 adults ages 39 to 79.

 

https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_169955.html

 

 

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REPATRIATING REMAINS TO THE PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA

NEBRASKA STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO REPATRIATE REMAINS AND OBJECTS TO THE PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA – Transfer to be Completed November 22nd. The skeletal remains of 10 individuals along with about 300 funerary objects will be repatriated to the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska on November 22nd. The transfer is being conducted by the Nebraska State Historical Society’s State Archeology Office and the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska under the requirements of the federal Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act and the Nebraska Unmarked Human Burial Sites and Skeletal Remains Protection Act.

All remains and objects, many being glass beads, date back to the 1700s and 1800s. They were inadvertently discovered during construction projects in Knox, Platte, and Butler counties. When human skeletal remains and burial goods are discovered and law enforcement determines a crime is not involved, Nebraska State Historical Society Archeology staff will be contacted by the appropriate county attorney’s office. Staff members are required to conduct an on-site investigation to determine the origin and identity of the remains and promptly relate the findings in writing to the county attorney and interested parties, who may include: a descendant Indian Tribe, a descendant family, or the Nebraska Indian Commission.

This specific repatriation is a joint project of the Nebraska State Historical Society, The Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs, and the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. Tribal members of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska will reclaim and prepare the remains for transfer and reburial in the Ponca homeland along the lower Niobrara River.

Lincoln, NE, November 17, 2017 – About The Nebraska State Historical Society

https://history.nebraska.gov/

The Nebraska State Historical Society (NSHS) collects, preserves, and opens to all the histories we share.  In addition to the Nebraska History Museum in Lincoln and historic sites around the state, NSHS administers the State Archives and Library; the State Historic Preservation Office; the Gerald R. Ford Conservation Center, Omaha; the Office of the State Archeologist; publishes Nebraska History magazine and Nebraska History News; and is responsible for the administration of the Nebraska Hall of Fame Commission. More at History.nebraska.gov or follow us on Facebook.

Smart bandage could promote better, faster healing | Nebraska Today | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Nebraska researcher Ali Tamayol has co-designed a smart bandage that can strategically release multiple medications to accelerate healing and fight infection.

SMARTPHONE-CONTROLLED DESIGN PRECISELY DELIVERS MEDICATION
Someday, a smart bandage could heal chronic wounds or battlefield injuries.

Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MIT have designed a smart bandage that could eventually heal chronic wounds or battlefield injuries with every fiber of its being.

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Advanced Functional Materials

The bandage consists of electrically conductive fibers coated in a gel that can be individually loaded with infection-fighting antibiotics, tissue-regenerating growth factors, painkillers or other medications.

A microcontroller no larger than a postage stamp, which could be triggered by a smartphone or other wireless device, sends small amounts of voltage through a chosen fiber. That voltage heats the fiber and its hydrogel, releasing whatever cargo it contains.

Smart Bandage
Video: Smart bandage

A single bandage could accommodate multiple medications tailored to a specific type of wound, the researchers said, while offering the ability to precisely control the dose and delivery schedule of those medications. That combination of customization and control could substantially improve or accelerate the healing process, said Ali Tamayol, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at Nebraska.

“This is the first bandage that is capable of dose-dependent drug release,” Tamayol said. “You can release multiple drugs with different release profiles. That’s a big advantage in comparison with other systems. What we did here was come up with a strategy for building a bandage from the bottom up.

“This is a platform that can be applied to many different areas of biomedical engineering and medicine.”

The team envisions its smart bandage being used initially to treat chronic skin wounds that stem from diabetes. More than 25 million Americans – and more than 25 percent of U.S. adults 65 and older – could suffer from such wounds. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that diabetes cases will double or triple by the year 2050.

Ali Tamayol
Ali Tamayol

“The medical cost associated with these types of wounds is tremendous,” Tamayol said. “So there is a big need to find solutions for that.”

Those wounded in combat might also benefit from the bandage’s versatility and customizability, Tamayol said, whether to stimulate faster healing of bullet and shrapnel wounds or prevent the onset of infection in remote environments.

“Soldiers on the battlefield may be suffering from a number of different injuries or infections,” he said. “They might be dealing with a number of different pathogens. Imagine that you have a variable patch that has antidotes or drugs targeted toward specific hazards in the environment.”

Bandage aid

Existing bandages range from basic dry patches to more advanced designs that can passively release an embedded medication over time. To evaluate the potential advantages of their smart bandage, Tamayol and his colleagues at Harvard ran a series of experiments.

In one, the researchers applied a smart bandage loaded with growth factor to wounded mice. When compared with a dry bandage, the team’s version regrew three times as much of the blood-rich tissue critical to the healing process.

Another experiment showed that an antibiotic-loaded version of the bandage could eradicate infection-causing bacteria. Collectively, Tamayol said, the experiments also demonstrated that the heat needed to release the medications did not affect their potency.

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Advanced Functional Materials – A prototype of the team’s design.

Though the researchers have patented their design, it will need to undergo further animal and then human testing before going to market. That could take several years, though the fact that most of the design’s components are already approved by the Food and Drug Administration should streamline the process, Tamayol said.

In the meantime, he said, the researchers are also working to incorporate thread-based sensors that can measure glucose, pH and other health-related indicators of skin tissue. Integrating that capability would allow the team to create a bandage that could autonomously deliver proper treatments.

The authors detailed their design and findings in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. Tamayol authored the study with Harvard’s Ali Khademhosseini, Pooria Mostafalu, Gita Kiaee, Giorgio Giatsidis, Akbar Khalilpour, Mahboobeh Nabavinia, Mehmet Dokmeci and Dennis Orgill, along with Sameer Sonkusale of Tufts University.

The researchers received support from the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research and the National Institutes of Health under grants HL092836, DE019024, EB012597, AR057837, DE021468, HL099073, and EB008392.

Source: Smart bandage could promote better, faster healing | Nebraska Today | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Open Enrollment Season Study: Americans’ Knowledge on Health Care Topics

As Nebraskans enter the open enrollment season, UnitedHealthcare has worked with an independent polling firm to uncover Americans’ knowledge and opinions about a range of health topics.

The 2017 UnitedHealthcare Consumer Sentiment Survey reveals Americans’ attitudes about five key health care topics: open enrollment, technology trends, health literacy, customer service, and the future of Medicare.

The results, which will be officially announced on Thursday, Oct. 5, include:

  • More Americans are turning to technology first to access health information and care. A growing number (42 percent) said they would be likely to use telemedicine in the future to access care, a 5 percentage point increase from 2016.
  • Most people underestimated the connection between lifestyle choices and disease. Many respondents underestimated the connection between modifiable lifestyle choice and chronic conditions, with just 23 percent of people correctly recognizing that 80 percent or more of premature chronic conditions are linked to controllable decisions such as smoking or poor diet.       
  • Many people say they are prepared for open enrollment. Nearly three-quarters (72 percent) of people said they are prepared for open enrollment, while 22 percent said they are unprepared.
  • Understanding of basic insurance terms slightly improved. Just 9 percent of respondents successfully defined all four basic health insurance concepts: plan premium, deductible, co-insurance and out-of-pocket maximum. That’s a slight improvement from 7 percent a year ago.
  • When it comes to customer service, people prefer live support. Most people (84 percent)
    preferred speaking with a customer service representative, up from 78 percent last year.

If you are interested in the results of the survey, please click here or let me know and I can connect you with Rebecca Madsen, chief consumer officer of UnitedHealthcare. Rebecca can discuss the survey results and provide tips and advice to help consumers more easily navigate the open enrollment process, helping them save money and make more informed health care choices.

 

Chinese History I: Antiquity to Early Imperial (2000 BCE -220 CE) | Confucius Institute | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Take a look at the resource material on China. -keith

Source: Chinese History I: Antiquity to Early Imperial (2000 BCE -220 CE) | Confucius Institute | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Huskers bring the heat to improve biodegradable plastics

Introducing a simple step to the production of plant-derived, biodegradable plastic could improve its properties while overcoming obstacles to manufacturing it on a commercial scale, says new research from Nebraska.

Use link below for the full story….

HUSKERS BRING THE HEAT TO IMPROVE BIODEGRADABLE PLASTICS
PHOTOS: Three high-resolution color photos are available at http://go.unl.edu/p8io.

Lincoln, Nebraska, Aug. 31, 2017 – Introducing a simple step to the production of plant-derived, biodegradable plastic could improve its properties while overcoming obstacles to manufacturing it commercially, says new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Jiangnan University.
That step? Bringing the heat.
Nebraska’s Yiqi Yang and colleagues found that raising the temperature of bio-plastic fibers to several hundred degrees Fahrenheit, then slowly allowing them to cool, greatly improved the bio-plastic’s normally lackluster resistance to heat and moisture.
Its thermal approach also allowed the team to bypass solvents and other expensive, time-consuming techniques typically needed to manufacture a commercially viable bio-plastic, the study reported.
Yang said the approach could allow manufacturers of corn-derived plastic – such as a Cargill plant in Blair – to continuously produce the biodegradable material on a scale that at least approaches petroleum-based plastic, the industry standard. Recent research estimates about 90 percent of U.S. plastic goes unrecycled.
“This clean technology makes possible (the) industrial-scale production of commercializable bio-based plastics,” the authors reported.

NOT EASY BEING GREEN

Source: Huskers bring the heat to improve biodegradable plastics | Nebraska Today | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

The Carbon Cycle : Feature Articles

Carbon flows between the atmosphere, land, and ocean in a cycle that encompasses nearly all life and sets the thermostat for Earth’s climate. By burning fossil fuels, people are changing the carbon cycle with far-reaching consequences.

Source: The Carbon Cycle : Feature Articles

A New Solar Still to Provide Clean Water For All | Science & Tech – BabaMail

A New Solar Still to Provide Clean Water For All

Planet Earth is now home to some 7.5 billion people. In spite of the ever-increasing population and life expectancy figures, one of the sad truths of our world is that more than one in 10 people do not have access to clean drinking water  – but all that might be about to change.Researchers at the State University of New York have created a portable solar still, which is a technology that will allow people to generate their own drinking water much like they generate energy with solar panels.

water

Solar stills have actually been around for millennia. They’re essentially black-bottomed vessels that filled with water after it has been trapped using a clear material (such as a sheet of plastic). The suns heats up the black container, causing the water to evaporate and become trapped in its upper layer, leaving contaminants and dirt behind.

The problems with solar stills to date have been the cost to set one up, and the amount of surface area required to produce an adequate amount of clean water each day. The researchers at the State University of New York managed to improve the ancient design in two fundamental ways, namely ensuring that it’s just the topmost layer of the water that gets heated for less lost energy, and employing materials that would make the new solar still design viable for the poorest people in the world to own.

water

Materials include a fiber-rich paper, similar to the paper used to print currency on, that’s coated in carbon black. The latter is a cheap powder that is left as a by-product of oil and tar production. Polystyrene blocks are also cut up and turned into 25 connected sections.

The polystyrene foam allows the solar still to float on the surface untreated water and acts as an insulating barrier, preventing sunlight from heating up too much of the water below. Evaporated water is trapped by a clear acrylic cover before being funneled into a collection vessel.

water

According to a report on the new solar still design, it channels the energy in sunlight into evaporating water with 88% efficiency. This level of efficiency allows the new design with a 1-square-meter surface area to purify 1 liter of water every hour, which is four times faster than commercially-available solar still designs.

At an estimated cost of just $1.60 per square meter, providing the minimal level water needed to sustain a family of four might cost as little as $5 per solar still. Are we on the cusp of a water revolution? Only time will tell.

Source: A New Solar Still to Provide Clean Water For All | Science & Tech – BabaMail

Learn About Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs | Health – BabaMail

Abraham Maslow theorized that all human behavior was performed in order to satisfy needs, from basic to more complex. Learn about his theory here.

Read the full article – Source: Learn About Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs | Health – BabaMail

Centenarians Often Healthier Than Younger Seniors: Study: MedlinePlus Health News

Americans who are 100 years or older have lower rates of chronic illness than younger seniors, a new study finds.

George Washington University researchers used U.S. Veterans Affairs Administration data to compare centenarians with people in their 80s and 90s. Most were white men who had fought in World War II.

“Additionally, this generation lived through the Great Depression,” study author Dr. Raya Elfadel Kheirbek said in a university news release. “It is a wonder, considering the hardships they had faced, that they have achieved such longevity.”

Source: Centenarians Often Healthier Than Younger Seniors: Study: MedlinePlus Health News

Senior Newspapers – nationwide.

If you have time, take a look at what other publishers are doing for Seniors. I hope the links are active. If not, go to the Source at: NAMPA – North America Mature Publishers Association

ALASKA
Senior Voice

ARIZONA
Lovin’ Life After 50

CALIFORNIA
Life After 50

COLORADO
Life After 50
BEACON Senior Newspaper

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
The DC Beacon

FLORIDA
Lifestyles After 50 – Tampa
Lifestyles After 50 – St Pete/Clearwater
Lifestyles After 50 – Ocala
Lifestyles After 50 – Sarasota
Lifestyles After 50 – Ft Myers
Senior Life Florida / Space Coast

ILLINOIS
Senior News 50 and Better
Mature Focus
PrimeLife Times

INDIANA
Senior Life of Indiana and Cinn., OH/KY 

KANSAS
The Active Age
The Best Times

KENTUCKY
Today’s Transitions

LOUISIANA
The Best of Times

MASSACHUSETTS
Fifty Plus Advocate
Prime Time Cape Cod
PRIME
South Shore Senior News

MARYLAND
The DC Beacon
The Baltimore Beacon
The Beacon – Howard County

MICHIGAN
Senior Perspectives

MINNESOTA
Good Age
The Senior Reporter

MISSOURI
Inside Columbia Prime

NEW MEXICO
Prime Time

NEW YORK
50 Plus Lifestyles
Forever Young

NORTH CAROLINA
Livin Out Loud

OHIO
Mature Living
Senior Life of Indiana and Cinn., OH/KY

ONTARIO – CANADA
Forever Young Information – Toronto
Forever Young Information – Hamilton

PENNSYLVANIA
50plus LIFE
Tri State Senior News

RHODE ISLAND
Senior Digest

TENNESSEE
Mature Lifestyles of Tennessee
The Best Times

UTAH
The Moab Star

VIRGINIA
Fifty Plus
Red Bird Times
The DC Beacon

WISCONSIN
50 Plus News Magazine

Source: NAMPA – North America Mature Publishers Association

The Mill Coffee and Bistro to open at Nebraska Innovation Campus

Daniel and Tamara Sloan, owners of The Mill Coffee and Tea, announced their plans to open a third Lincoln location at Nebraska Innovation Campus this summer.

The new shop, to be called The Mill Coffee and Bistro, will feature The Mill’s signature coffees and teas as well as an expanded food menu of breakfast items, lunch items, small plates, snacks, wine and beer.

The Mill Coffee and Tea is a small-batch craft coffee roaster, espresso bar and tea house that was started in Lincoln in 1975. The original store is now located at 800 P St. in the Historic Haymarket.

Daniel Sloan said it has been 17 years since The Mill opened its second location, on Prescott Avenue near South 48th Street – and that he believes the new spot at NIC is the next compelling opportunity for The Mill.

“The new Mill Coffee and Bistro at Nebraska Innovation Campus will allow us to provide the warm, welcoming, collaborative community we love to create in an environment that strives to enhance and support education, research and innovation,” he said.

The Bistro’s menu will include a full line of pastries, quiche, breakfast burritos, yogurt parfaits and fresh fruits. Additional menu items will include salads, soups and hot and cold sandwiches, a variety of small plates and snacks. The Bistro will also offer cask wine, a selection of bottled wine, and local and regional craft beers.

“We are so fortunate to have The Mill Coffee and Bistro locate at NIC,” said Dan Duncan, NIC executive director. “The Bistro will play a significant role in creating the culture and social activities key to developing an environment of innovation on campus.”

Construction on the new NIC restaurant space will start this month. The Bistro will be on the first floor of the campus’ north Innovation Commons building. The space will feature dining, meeting and gathering space. Guests will find soft seating for small group gathering, a communal table, audio-visual equipment for small meetings and free WiFi.

NIC is a research campus designed to facilitate new and in-depth partnerships between the university and private-sector businesses. At full build-out, NIC will be a 2.2-million square-foot campus with uniquely designed buildings and amenities that inspire creative activity and engagement, transforming ideas into global innovation.

NEBRASKA TODAY: http://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/unltoday

NEWS RELEASES: http://news.unl.edu/news-releases/1/

EXPERTS SITE: http://news.unl.edu/experts

WRITER: Kate Engel, Nebraska Innovation Campus
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Office of University Communication
1217 Q St. Lincoln, NE 68588-0218

 

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