Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

The 10 Healthiest Eating Habits You Can Adopt

Diets and food plans can be hard to stick to, and will not necessarily result in any long-term success. This is because people tend to slip back into their old habits very quickly, despite their best of intentions. The inevitable byproduct of these failures is feeling disheartened or demoralized, but healthy eating doesn’t need to be this way. Here are the 10 healthiest eating habits you can adopt (and stick to):

1. Stay Away From Processed Food
2. Make the Switch to Whole Grains
3. Use Healthy Cooking Methods
4. Watch Your Portion Sizes5. Be Aware of Healthy Options when you’re Eating Out –  includes:  Set aside half the dish and ask for it in a takeaway container.
 6. Keep a Food Diary

7. Eat Healthily at Social Events
8. Plan Your Healthy Shopping
9. You Can Have a Treat – Occasionally
10. Drink Lots of Water

DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION LAUNCHES COMPREHENSIVE DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS
Recommendations Emphasize High Quality, Person-Centered Care in Long-Term and Community-Based
OMAHA, January 19, 2018 – Yesterday, the Alzheimer’s Association released new dementia care practice recommendations aimed at helping nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and other long-term care and community care providers deliver optimal quality, person-centered care for those living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. The recommendations are posted online today and will be published as a supplement to the February issue of The Gerontologist.
The Alzheimer’s Association 2018 Dementia Care Practice Recommendations outline 56 recommendations across 10 content areas, grounded in the fundamentals of person-centered care. They were developed by 27 dementia care experts convened by the Alzheimer’s Association and are based on a comprehensive review of current evidence, best practice, and expert opinion.
The recommendations seek to better define quality care across all care settings, and throughout the disease course. They are intended for professional care providers who work with individuals living with dementia and their families in long-term and community-based care settings.
“Since its inception, the Alzheimer’s Association has been a leader in outlining principles and practices of quality care for individuals living with dementia,” said Sam Fazio, Ph.D., lead author and Director of Quality Care and Psychosocial Research, Alzheimer’s Association. “These recommendations reflect the most current research and best practices to help ensure high-quality, person-centered care for people living with Alzheimer’s in long-term and community-based settings.”
It is estimated that nearly 60 percent of older adults with Alzheimer’s or other dementias reside in the community (outside a hospital or clinical setting). About 25 percent of these individuals live alone, but the remainder receives care from family members, unpaid caregivers, and community-based and residential care providers. By age 80, 75 percent of people with Alzheimer’s dementia are admitted to a nursing home. The new recommendations are aimed at guiding care in these settings.
In addition to updating and enhancing previous recommendations in areas familiar to the dementia care community, the recommendations break important new ground. Most notably, the recommendations offer guidance to community-based and residential care providers on detection and diagnosis and ongoing medical management — topic areas typically reserved for clinicians. Recommendations in these two areas are written specifically for non-physician care providers and address what these providers can do to help with these important aspects of holistic, person-centered dementia care.
“Detection and diagnosis, and medical management are critical, vital areas of care. While clinicians must continue to take a lead role in these areas, there are important contributions dementia care providers can make to improve outcomes in these areas,” Fazio said. “Our recommendations outline appropriate actions dementia care providers can make to complement and enhance the work clinicians are doing. Having both groups focus on these critical areas will result in better care for people struggling with this disease.”
Other areas covered by the recommendations include:
  • Fundamentals of person-centered care
  • Assessment and care planning
  • Information, education and support
  • Ongoing care for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia
  • Support of activities in daily living
  • Staffing
  • Supportive and therapeutic environments
The 56 recommendations are detailed in 10 area-specific articles published in the February supplement. In addition to providing greater details about each recommendation, the articles provide evidence and expert opinion supporting each recommendation. All 10 articles and an overview article summarizing all the recommendations appear online for the first time yesterday.
The Alzheimer’s Association will share the recommendations with policymakers and the dementia care community formally during a Capitol Hill event on February 14 with special guest remarks by Senator Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.).  Dementia care experts who developed the recommendations will provide deeper context and explanation behind the new recommendations.
There are an estimated 5.5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease today. It is the sixth-leading cause of death, and the only disease among the top 10 causes of death that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s is projected to reach nearly 14 million by 2050, unless more effective treatments are advanced. For more information on the recommendations, visit alz.org/practicerecommendations.
Alzheimer’s Association®
The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit alz.org.
The Alzheimer’s Association Nebraska Chapter serves all 93 counties in Nebraska.  In addition to offering free education and support services, the Chapter also raises money for local and national research efforts through the Walk to End Alzheimer’s and The Longest Day events.  Staff and volunteers also work together to encourage state legislators to make Alzheimer’s disease a priority in the state by increasing funding for the disease.

See – https://www.alz.org/nebraska/

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10 Facts About Senior Living

That Will Surprise You

10 Facts About Senior Living That Will Surprise You

 

Fact #1: “80 is the new 65.”

Fact #2: The need for diverse eldercare is skyrocketing.

Fact #3: The typical assisted living resident is an independent female.

Fact #4: Specialized eldercare is on the rise.

Fact #5: Skilled nursing facilities are the most expensive care option – and may not be sustainable.

Fact #6: Seniors and their families are not prepared for the costs of long-term care.

Fact #7: Community and home-based care are on the rise.

Fact #8: Owning your own home may not make the most financial sense.

Fact #9: Many seniors avoid advanced care planning.

Fact #10: Staying active is the best prevention, even if you’ve been inactive all your life.

 Too Much Screen Time Hinders Health of Kids AND Seniors  

You’ve probably heard about the importance of limiting the amount of time kids spend watching TV, being on the computer or playing video games to ensure they get enough physical activity and limit the barrage of junk food marketing on TV that influences them. In general, too much sedentary behavior affects everyone’s health, but for older adults, it can not only negatively impact their physical health and hinder mobility, but their social/emotional health as well.   Aging Partners interviewed PHL President, Dr. Bob Rauner about the effects of too much screen time on senior health for  the Winter 2018 edition of Living Well magazine.  Read or download Living Well here.

For Seniors, Any Physical Activity Is Better Than None

HealthDay news image .  FRIDAY, Nov. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) —

Don’t try saying you’re too or too busy to exercise, especially after that calorie-laden Thanksgiving dinner. Any level of physical activity can reduce seniors’ risk of heart disease, researchers report.
The 18-year study included more than 24,000 adults ages 39 to 79.

 

https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_169955.html

 

 

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REPATRIATING REMAINS TO THE PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA

NEBRASKA STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO REPATRIATE REMAINS AND OBJECTS TO THE PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA – Transfer to be Completed November 22nd. The skeletal remains of 10 individuals along with about 300 funerary objects will be repatriated to the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska on November 22nd. The transfer is being conducted by the Nebraska State Historical Society’s State Archeology Office and the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska under the requirements of the federal Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act and the Nebraska Unmarked Human Burial Sites and Skeletal Remains Protection Act.

All remains and objects, many being glass beads, date back to the 1700s and 1800s. They were inadvertently discovered during construction projects in Knox, Platte, and Butler counties. When human skeletal remains and burial goods are discovered and law enforcement determines a crime is not involved, Nebraska State Historical Society Archeology staff will be contacted by the appropriate county attorney’s office. Staff members are required to conduct an on-site investigation to determine the origin and identity of the remains and promptly relate the findings in writing to the county attorney and interested parties, who may include: a descendant Indian Tribe, a descendant family, or the Nebraska Indian Commission.

This specific repatriation is a joint project of the Nebraska State Historical Society, The Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs, and the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. Tribal members of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska will reclaim and prepare the remains for transfer and reburial in the Ponca homeland along the lower Niobrara River.

Lincoln, NE, November 17, 2017 – About The Nebraska State Historical Society

https://history.nebraska.gov/

The Nebraska State Historical Society (NSHS) collects, preserves, and opens to all the histories we share.  In addition to the Nebraska History Museum in Lincoln and historic sites around the state, NSHS administers the State Archives and Library; the State Historic Preservation Office; the Gerald R. Ford Conservation Center, Omaha; the Office of the State Archeologist; publishes Nebraska History magazine and Nebraska History News; and is responsible for the administration of the Nebraska Hall of Fame Commission. More at History.nebraska.gov or follow us on Facebook.

Smart bandage could promote better, faster healing | Nebraska Today | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Nebraska researcher Ali Tamayol has co-designed a smart bandage that can strategically release multiple medications to accelerate healing and fight infection.

SMARTPHONE-CONTROLLED DESIGN PRECISELY DELIVERS MEDICATION
Someday, a smart bandage could heal chronic wounds or battlefield injuries.

Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MIT have designed a smart bandage that could eventually heal chronic wounds or battlefield injuries with every fiber of its being.

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Advanced Functional Materials

The bandage consists of electrically conductive fibers coated in a gel that can be individually loaded with infection-fighting antibiotics, tissue-regenerating growth factors, painkillers or other medications.

A microcontroller no larger than a postage stamp, which could be triggered by a smartphone or other wireless device, sends small amounts of voltage through a chosen fiber. That voltage heats the fiber and its hydrogel, releasing whatever cargo it contains.

Smart Bandage
Video: Smart bandage

A single bandage could accommodate multiple medications tailored to a specific type of wound, the researchers said, while offering the ability to precisely control the dose and delivery schedule of those medications. That combination of customization and control could substantially improve or accelerate the healing process, said Ali Tamayol, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at Nebraska.

“This is the first bandage that is capable of dose-dependent drug release,” Tamayol said. “You can release multiple drugs with different release profiles. That’s a big advantage in comparison with other systems. What we did here was come up with a strategy for building a bandage from the bottom up.

“This is a platform that can be applied to many different areas of biomedical engineering and medicine.”

The team envisions its smart bandage being used initially to treat chronic skin wounds that stem from diabetes. More than 25 million Americans – and more than 25 percent of U.S. adults 65 and older – could suffer from such wounds. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that diabetes cases will double or triple by the year 2050.

Ali Tamayol
Ali Tamayol

“The medical cost associated with these types of wounds is tremendous,” Tamayol said. “So there is a big need to find solutions for that.”

Those wounded in combat might also benefit from the bandage’s versatility and customizability, Tamayol said, whether to stimulate faster healing of bullet and shrapnel wounds or prevent the onset of infection in remote environments.

“Soldiers on the battlefield may be suffering from a number of different injuries or infections,” he said. “They might be dealing with a number of different pathogens. Imagine that you have a variable patch that has antidotes or drugs targeted toward specific hazards in the environment.”

Bandage aid

Existing bandages range from basic dry patches to more advanced designs that can passively release an embedded medication over time. To evaluate the potential advantages of their smart bandage, Tamayol and his colleagues at Harvard ran a series of experiments.

In one, the researchers applied a smart bandage loaded with growth factor to wounded mice. When compared with a dry bandage, the team’s version regrew three times as much of the blood-rich tissue critical to the healing process.

Another experiment showed that an antibiotic-loaded version of the bandage could eradicate infection-causing bacteria. Collectively, Tamayol said, the experiments also demonstrated that the heat needed to release the medications did not affect their potency.

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Advanced Functional Materials – A prototype of the team’s design.

Though the researchers have patented their design, it will need to undergo further animal and then human testing before going to market. That could take several years, though the fact that most of the design’s components are already approved by the Food and Drug Administration should streamline the process, Tamayol said.

In the meantime, he said, the researchers are also working to incorporate thread-based sensors that can measure glucose, pH and other health-related indicators of skin tissue. Integrating that capability would allow the team to create a bandage that could autonomously deliver proper treatments.

The authors detailed their design and findings in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. Tamayol authored the study with Harvard’s Ali Khademhosseini, Pooria Mostafalu, Gita Kiaee, Giorgio Giatsidis, Akbar Khalilpour, Mahboobeh Nabavinia, Mehmet Dokmeci and Dennis Orgill, along with Sameer Sonkusale of Tufts University.

The researchers received support from the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research and the National Institutes of Health under grants HL092836, DE019024, EB012597, AR057837, DE021468, HL099073, and EB008392.

Source: Smart bandage could promote better, faster healing | Nebraska Today | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

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