Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Brain Cells Keep on Growing, Even in the Elderly…

While many people assume that brain cells are gone forever once dead, new research has now revealed that humans actually continue to produce them long throughout adulthood, and their findings may have a significant impact on the way diseases like Alzheimer’s are treated.

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM LAWS AN ALL-AMERICAN DISPUTE,

Lincoln, Nebraska, March 5, 2018 – A Colorado baker’s refusal to make a wedding cake for a gay couple is so divisive that it has made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Following legalization of same-sex marriage, some states have passed laws that allow business owners to refuse services to same-sex couples based upon religious belief.
Yet new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln indicates that most Nebraskans – 64 percent of nearly 1,100 survey respondents – oppose such laws. The results mirror national polls that have shown religious freedom laws lack broad support among Americans.
Sociologists Emily Kazyak and Kelsy Burke analyzed responses to why Nebraskans support or oppose a business owner’s right to refuse service to gays and lesbians to gain insight into why these laws continue to gain traction in state Legislatures even though most Americans do not actually agree with them.  Mathew Stange, who received his doctoral degree in survey research and methodology at Nebraska and is now a survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, also participated in the study.
They found that both sides base their appeals upon bedrock American values of freedom and capitalism.
Those who side with the baker say he has the right to act upon his religious convictions and that free enterprise means that plenty of other bakers would serve the couple. Those who side with the couple say they have the right to be free from discrimination and that free enterprise demands that all customers be served.
Kazyak said both sides share the belief that Americans have a fundamental right to freely live their lives.
“The disagreement is not over the value of freedom or equality per se,” she said. “It’s over the questions of whose rights are most worthy of protection and whose freedom is potentially jeopardized in the current moment.”
The researchers noted that as LGBTQ people have gained acceptance and visibility, conservative Christians have begun to portray themselves as a group under threat.
“Protestant Christians have always been the dominant religious group in America, yet evangelical Protestant legislators are now leading efforts to pass these religious freedom laws,” Burke said. “They are thus sending a clear message that they believe their religious beliefs are under threat.”
The Supreme Court, which heard arguments in the Colorado case in December, is expected to rule on the matter by June.
The study was based on data collected by the 2015 Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey. NASIS is an annual cross-sectional omnibus survey of Nebraskans 19 and older, conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research at Nebraska.
Findings were published online Feb. 28 in Socius, a  research journal of the American Sociological Association.

March 2 – Women’s role in 1898 Omaha World’s Fair

Katz’s research on women’s role in 1898 Omaha World’s Fair leads to exhibition and talk at Omaha Public Library

Omaha – Friday, March 2, 2018 (4:00PM – 6:00PM)
W. Dale Clark (Main) Library
"The Trans-Mississippi and International Expositions of 1898–1899: Art, Anthropology, and Popular Culture at the Fin de Siècle,"
“The Trans-Mississippi and International Expositions of 1898–1899: Art, Anthropology, and Popular Culture at the Fin de Siècle,”

Assoc. Prof. Wendy Katz, the editor of “The Trans-Mississippi and International Expositions of 1898–1899: Art, Anthropology, and Popular Culture at the Fin de Siècle,” will be joined by Emily Godbey, Jillian Roger and Timothy Schaffert, on March 2nd, in a discussion about the ways that women participated in and were represented at Omaha’s World Fair in 1898.

http://newsroom.unl.edu/announce/artupdate/7714/43878

Lincoln’s self-driving system in downtown

 

Lincoln is one of 35 Champion Cities chosen to develop a self-driving micro-transit system in downtown.  

 

Bloomberg Philanthropies has named Lincoln as one of 35 Champion Cities for its idea to develop a self-driving micro-transit system in downtown.  Mayor Chris Beutler and others involved in the proposed project will discuss the award and the next steps at a news conference at 9:30 a.m. Friday, February 23 in Room 303, County City Building, 555 S. 10th Street.

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 555 S. 10th Street, Lincoln, NE

The 10 Healthiest Eating Habits You Can Adopt

Diets and food plans can be hard to stick to, and will not necessarily result in any long-term success. This is because people tend to slip back into their old habits very quickly, despite their best of intentions. The inevitable byproduct of these failures is feeling disheartened or demoralized, but healthy eating doesn’t need to be this way. Here are the 10 healthiest eating habits you can adopt (and stick to):

1. Stay Away From Processed Food
2. Make the Switch to Whole Grains
3. Use Healthy Cooking Methods
4. Watch Your Portion Sizes5. Be Aware of Healthy Options when you’re Eating Out –  includes:  Set aside half the dish and ask for it in a takeaway container.
 6. Keep a Food Diary

7. Eat Healthily at Social Events
8. Plan Your Healthy Shopping
9. You Can Have a Treat – Occasionally
10. Drink Lots of Water

DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION LAUNCHES COMPREHENSIVE DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS
Recommendations Emphasize High Quality, Person-Centered Care in Long-Term and Community-Based
OMAHA, January 19, 2018 – Yesterday, the Alzheimer’s Association released new dementia care practice recommendations aimed at helping nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and other long-term care and community care providers deliver optimal quality, person-centered care for those living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. The recommendations are posted online today and will be published as a supplement to the February issue of The Gerontologist.
The Alzheimer’s Association 2018 Dementia Care Practice Recommendations outline 56 recommendations across 10 content areas, grounded in the fundamentals of person-centered care. They were developed by 27 dementia care experts convened by the Alzheimer’s Association and are based on a comprehensive review of current evidence, best practice, and expert opinion.
The recommendations seek to better define quality care across all care settings, and throughout the disease course. They are intended for professional care providers who work with individuals living with dementia and their families in long-term and community-based care settings.
“Since its inception, the Alzheimer’s Association has been a leader in outlining principles and practices of quality care for individuals living with dementia,” said Sam Fazio, Ph.D., lead author and Director of Quality Care and Psychosocial Research, Alzheimer’s Association. “These recommendations reflect the most current research and best practices to help ensure high-quality, person-centered care for people living with Alzheimer’s in long-term and community-based settings.”
It is estimated that nearly 60 percent of older adults with Alzheimer’s or other dementias reside in the community (outside a hospital or clinical setting). About 25 percent of these individuals live alone, but the remainder receives care from family members, unpaid caregivers, and community-based and residential care providers. By age 80, 75 percent of people with Alzheimer’s dementia are admitted to a nursing home. The new recommendations are aimed at guiding care in these settings.
In addition to updating and enhancing previous recommendations in areas familiar to the dementia care community, the recommendations break important new ground. Most notably, the recommendations offer guidance to community-based and residential care providers on detection and diagnosis and ongoing medical management — topic areas typically reserved for clinicians. Recommendations in these two areas are written specifically for non-physician care providers and address what these providers can do to help with these important aspects of holistic, person-centered dementia care.
“Detection and diagnosis, and medical management are critical, vital areas of care. While clinicians must continue to take a lead role in these areas, there are important contributions dementia care providers can make to improve outcomes in these areas,” Fazio said. “Our recommendations outline appropriate actions dementia care providers can make to complement and enhance the work clinicians are doing. Having both groups focus on these critical areas will result in better care for people struggling with this disease.”
Other areas covered by the recommendations include:
  • Fundamentals of person-centered care
  • Assessment and care planning
  • Information, education and support
  • Ongoing care for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia
  • Support of activities in daily living
  • Staffing
  • Supportive and therapeutic environments
The 56 recommendations are detailed in 10 area-specific articles published in the February supplement. In addition to providing greater details about each recommendation, the articles provide evidence and expert opinion supporting each recommendation. All 10 articles and an overview article summarizing all the recommendations appear online for the first time yesterday.
The Alzheimer’s Association will share the recommendations with policymakers and the dementia care community formally during a Capitol Hill event on February 14 with special guest remarks by Senator Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.).  Dementia care experts who developed the recommendations will provide deeper context and explanation behind the new recommendations.
There are an estimated 5.5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease today. It is the sixth-leading cause of death, and the only disease among the top 10 causes of death that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s is projected to reach nearly 14 million by 2050, unless more effective treatments are advanced. For more information on the recommendations, visit alz.org/practicerecommendations.
Alzheimer’s Association®
The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit alz.org.
The Alzheimer’s Association Nebraska Chapter serves all 93 counties in Nebraska.  In addition to offering free education and support services, the Chapter also raises money for local and national research efforts through the Walk to End Alzheimer’s and The Longest Day events.  Staff and volunteers also work together to encourage state legislators to make Alzheimer’s disease a priority in the state by increasing funding for the disease.

See – https://www.alz.org/nebraska/

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10 Facts About Senior Living

That Will Surprise You

10 Facts About Senior Living That Will Surprise You

 

Fact #1: “80 is the new 65.”

Fact #2: The need for diverse eldercare is skyrocketing.

Fact #3: The typical assisted living resident is an independent female.

Fact #4: Specialized eldercare is on the rise.

Fact #5: Skilled nursing facilities are the most expensive care option – and may not be sustainable.

Fact #6: Seniors and their families are not prepared for the costs of long-term care.

Fact #7: Community and home-based care are on the rise.

Fact #8: Owning your own home may not make the most financial sense.

Fact #9: Many seniors avoid advanced care planning.

Fact #10: Staying active is the best prevention, even if you’ve been inactive all your life.

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