Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

June 10 – Genealogy & Family History Day

Genealogy & Family History Day – June 10, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the UNL College of Business Administration, 12th and R streets
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries will host its third annual genealogy and family history day from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. June 10 in Room 143 of the College of Business Administration building, 12th and R streets. This year’s theme is “Family History Research through Life’s Stages.”

The event is free, but seating is limited. Pre-registration is required. A full program and registration information are available at http://go.unl.edu/tiky or by emailing Joan Barnes at jbarnes3@unl.edu<mailto:jbarnes3@unl.edu> or Tom McFarland at t_m@unl.edu<mailto:t_m@unl.edu>.

Participants can learn about resources that reveal information about a person’s life from birth, school, adulthood and death. Presenters will highlight a diverse range of resources available through courthouses, county government offices, historical societies and libraries. Professional genealogists Gail Blankenau and Marcia Stewart will give talks on citing sources and using church records, respectively.

Participants can attend the entire day or specific sessions. They can bring a lunch or purchase lunch at a downtown restaurant.

Source: Genealogy & Family History Day | Libraries | University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Senior Newspapers – nationwide.

If you have time, take a look at what other publishers are doing for Seniors. I hope the links are active. If not, go to the Source at: NAMPA – North America Mature Publishers Association

ALASKA
Senior Voice

ARIZONA
Lovin’ Life After 50

CALIFORNIA
Life After 50

COLORADO
Life After 50
BEACON Senior Newspaper

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
The DC Beacon

FLORIDA
Lifestyles After 50 – Tampa
Lifestyles After 50 – St Pete/Clearwater
Lifestyles After 50 – Ocala
Lifestyles After 50 – Sarasota
Lifestyles After 50 – Ft Myers
Senior Life Florida / Space Coast

ILLINOIS
Senior News 50 and Better
Mature Focus
PrimeLife Times

INDIANA
Senior Life of Indiana and Cinn., OH/KY 

KANSAS
The Active Age
The Best Times

KENTUCKY
Today’s Transitions

LOUISIANA
The Best of Times

MASSACHUSETTS
Fifty Plus Advocate
Prime Time Cape Cod
PRIME
South Shore Senior News

MARYLAND
The DC Beacon
The Baltimore Beacon
The Beacon – Howard County

MICHIGAN
Senior Perspectives

MINNESOTA
Good Age
The Senior Reporter

MISSOURI
Inside Columbia Prime

NEW MEXICO
Prime Time

NEW YORK
50 Plus Lifestyles
Forever Young

NORTH CAROLINA
Livin Out Loud

OHIO
Mature Living
Senior Life of Indiana and Cinn., OH/KY

ONTARIO – CANADA
Forever Young Information – Toronto
Forever Young Information – Hamilton

PENNSYLVANIA
50plus LIFE
Tri State Senior News

RHODE ISLAND
Senior Digest

TENNESSEE
Mature Lifestyles of Tennessee
The Best Times

UTAH
The Moab Star

VIRGINIA
Fifty Plus
Red Bird Times
The DC Beacon

WISCONSIN
50 Plus News Magazine

Source: NAMPA – North America Mature Publishers Association

The Mill Coffee and Bistro to open at Nebraska Innovation Campus

Daniel and Tamara Sloan, owners of The Mill Coffee and Tea, announced their plans to open a third Lincoln location at Nebraska Innovation Campus this summer.

The new shop, to be called The Mill Coffee and Bistro, will feature The Mill’s signature coffees and teas as well as an expanded food menu of breakfast items, lunch items, small plates, snacks, wine and beer.

The Mill Coffee and Tea is a small-batch craft coffee roaster, espresso bar and tea house that was started in Lincoln in 1975. The original store is now located at 800 P St. in the Historic Haymarket.

Daniel Sloan said it has been 17 years since The Mill opened its second location, on Prescott Avenue near South 48th Street – and that he believes the new spot at NIC is the next compelling opportunity for The Mill.

“The new Mill Coffee and Bistro at Nebraska Innovation Campus will allow us to provide the warm, welcoming, collaborative community we love to create in an environment that strives to enhance and support education, research and innovation,” he said.

The Bistro’s menu will include a full line of pastries, quiche, breakfast burritos, yogurt parfaits and fresh fruits. Additional menu items will include salads, soups and hot and cold sandwiches, a variety of small plates and snacks. The Bistro will also offer cask wine, a selection of bottled wine, and local and regional craft beers.

“We are so fortunate to have The Mill Coffee and Bistro locate at NIC,” said Dan Duncan, NIC executive director. “The Bistro will play a significant role in creating the culture and social activities key to developing an environment of innovation on campus.”

Construction on the new NIC restaurant space will start this month. The Bistro will be on the first floor of the campus’ north Innovation Commons building. The space will feature dining, meeting and gathering space. Guests will find soft seating for small group gathering, a communal table, audio-visual equipment for small meetings and free WiFi.

NIC is a research campus designed to facilitate new and in-depth partnerships between the university and private-sector businesses. At full build-out, NIC will be a 2.2-million square-foot campus with uniquely designed buildings and amenities that inspire creative activity and engagement, transforming ideas into global innovation.

NEBRASKA TODAY: http://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/unltoday

NEWS RELEASES: http://news.unl.edu/news-releases/1/

EXPERTS SITE: http://news.unl.edu/experts

WRITER: Kate Engel, Nebraska Innovation Campus
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Office of University Communication
1217 Q St. Lincoln, NE 68588-0218

 

MANUFACTURING EFFICIENCY INITIATIVE

Lincoln, NE Feb. 23, 2017 – An engineering team headed by three University of Nebraska-Lincoln faculty has earned a $1.4 million U.S. Department of Energy grant to help smaller manufacturers use energy more efficiently while students learn energy management and manufacturing processes.
The department’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy announced in late 2016 that the university would be one of eight new Industrial Assessment Centers to join 20 existing centers around the country. Months earlier, the university was approved as a headquarters site and began work as the Nebraska Industrial Assessment Center. Robert Williams, associate professor of mechanical and materials engineering; Bruce Dvorak, professor of civil engineering; and George Gogos, professor of mechanical and materials engineering; direct the Nebraska group.
Faculty and student teams perform on-site assessments at small- and medium-sized manufacturing business partners – those having gross annual sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees and annual energy bills between $100,000 and $2.5 million.
In exchange for hosting the assessment, manufacturers get an assessment report to improve productivity, secure information, reduce waste and save energy. Meanwhile, engineering students train in manufacturing processes, energy assessment procedures and energy management systems.
The program also encourages applicants to propose creative approaches to providing IAC services in innovative “smart” manufacturing, cybersecurity, water/wastewater and energy management systems.
The Nebraska IAC’s partners include Lincoln Electric System, Nebraska Public Power District, the Nebraska State Energy Office and the university’s Nebraska Manufacturing Extension Partnership, which is led by Curtis Weller, professor of biological systems engineering.
Williams said the Nebraska IAC would have an impact over a large geographic area. The nearest centers at U.S. universities are in Utah, Illinois and Oklahoma.
“It’s a huge opportunity. We have a lot of work ahead of us,” he said. “Without us, there would be a big hole in the center of the map.”
PHOTOS: Four high-resolution color photos – including photos of Robert Williams, Bruce Dvorak and George Gogos – are available at http://go.unl.edu/fumb. Cutline information is provided below.

2017 Nebraska Bills affecting seniors

These are now being scheduled for hearing dates.  You find attached the legislation that we have identified that impacts seniors and are of particular interest.

I am sorry that the links do not work here. -keith

 

Year

Bill #

Sponsor

One Liner

Status

Select

2017

LR11

Riepe

Interim study to assess the Nebraska medical assistance program and the options for health care reform for Nebraska

Committee

Select

2017

LB65

Hansen

Provide income tax credits for caregivers

Committee

Select

2017

LB79

Blood

Adopt the Small Business Retirement Marketplace Act

 

Select

2017

LB92

Kolterman

Require health carriers to provide coverage for telehealth services

Committee

Select

2017

LB104

Bolz

Provide for a surrogate to make health care decisions

Committee

Select

2017

LB122

Pansing Brooks

Provide for family member visitation petitions

Committee

Select

2017

LB169

Wayne

Exempt social security benefits and retirement income from income taxation

 

Select

2017

LB217

Harr

Change provisions relating to the accrual of interest on denied and reduced homestead exemptions

 

Select

2017

LB239

Baker

Change provisions relating to trust funds under the Burial Pre-Need Sale Act

 

Select

2017

LB268

Schumacher

Change court and other provisions relating to medical assistance reimbursement

Committee

Select

2017

LB323

Kolterman

Adopt the Palliative Care and Quality of Life Act

Committee

Select

2017

LB417

Riepe

Change and eliminate provisions relating to public health and welfare

 

Select

2017

LB439

Wishart

Change licensure and regulation provisions for assisted-living facilities

 

Select

2017

LB442

Bolz

Create the Medical Assistance Managed Care Organization Oversight Committee

Committee

Select

2017

LB453

Lindstrom

Change provisions relating to income tax adjustments for social security benefits

 

Select

2017

LB649

Pansing Brooks

Prohibit additional services or populations under the medicaid managed care program

 

Hour-Long Nap May Boost Brain Function in Older Adults: MedlinePlus Health News

By Mary Elizabeth Dallas – Friday, January 6, 2017

Finally, we have support for our napping – if I remember right —> keith ->>>>>

HealthDay news image

FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Napping for an hour in the afternoon may provide a mental boost for older adults, a new study suggests.

This extra daytime sleep was linked to improved memory and ability to think clearly among the Chinese study participants, the researchers said.

See details – Source: Hour-Long Nap May Boost Brain Function in Older Adults: MedlinePlus Health News

You Need to Know This Before Buying Bottled Water

When buying bottled water, consumers are advised to check the bottom of the bottle, in order to protect their health. Plastic bottles labeled with letters like HDP, HDPE, PP and a few others, do not release any toxic material in the water, and the remaining letters can represent the chemicals…

Source: You Need to Know This Before Buying Bottled Water

So important that I will include the text here.

A Complete Guide to Plastic Bottle Safety

 We have been using plastic bottles all our lives. But let’s face it – we all tend to be a bit skeptical about the actual consequences they have on our health. We are right in knowing they contain harmful chemicals, but the degree of this harm varies according to the type of plastic used. You may never have been informed of the ways plastic bottles harm us and which types of plastic cause the most harm – but the answers all lie at the bottom of your bottle.
If you flip your plastic bottle over you are likely to see letters marked on or close to its base. Some common ones include PET, PVC, HDP and PP. If these don’t sound familiar to you, you’re not alone – we are going to help you decipher their meaning. This will hopefully help you make wiser choices when buying water bottles.
Here’s what each label means:
water-bottles

1. PET or PETE: 

This one probably sounds familiar. It is the most commonly used plastic material in packaging and consumer products, used especially for water and soft drink bottles. This kind of plastic is only intended for single use and is difficult to decontaminate, meaning that repeated use can be harmful. The more you use it, the higher the risk of leach and bacteria. Also, the metals and chemicals released by this material may tamper with our body’s hormonal balance.

water-bottles

2. HDP or HDPE:

HDPE is a harder type of plastic often used for milk jugs, detergent bottles, oil bottles, toys and some plastic bags. Experts claim that this is the safest kind of plastic that you can choose when buying bottled water, because it barely releases any chemicals. This means your water will be cleaner, hence causing minimal harmful effects on your health

water-bottles

3. PVC or 3V:

This symbol indicates the use of PVC, a highly toxicplastic that is soft and flexible, and is generally used for food wrapping, oil bottles, teething rings, toys, and blister packaging. The chemicals it releases are said to have serious consequences on our body, since they pose effects on our hormones. Experts suggest to avoid packaging made from the PVC and try to find an alternative to it.

water-bottles

4. LDPE:

Although this type of plastic does not release chemicals into the water, you are unlikely to see this label on your water bottle, because the LDPE material is not used in its production. Rather, you would find it in food packaging, in the case of which you should still try to avoid it. LDPE may still release highly dangerous chemicals in the foods you eat.

water-bottles

5. PP:

Yogurt cups and syrup packing are made of this white-colored or semi-transparent type of plastic, referred to as PP (polypropylene plastic). This kind of material is tough, lightweight and heat-resistant. This material won’t melt easily if heated. Overall, it is a rather safe type of plastic, and  it can also block out moisture, grease and chemicals.

water-bottles

6. PS:

PS stands for Polystyrene – a type of inexpensive and lightweight plastic that is used for a range of products. We have often used this type of plastic for disposable styrofoam drinking cups, egg cartons, plastic picnic cutlery, and take-out “clamshell“ food containers. PS should be restricted to short-term usage only, since dangerous carcinogenic substances could be released from it when heated.

7. PC or non-labeled plastic:

This is potentially the most dangerous plastic found out there. If you ever find the “PC” label on plastic bottles (or no label at all), make sure you steer clear of it as much as possible. It refers to a catch-all category for polycarbonate materials and “other” plastics, which contain chemicals that are likely to leach into the food or drink products it makes contact with. Examples of the use of this material include sports water bottles and food containers. It is highly discouraged to reuse or recycle this type of plastic.

 

Note: These kinds of plastics are not only used for food and drink products. We also find them in everyday items in which they may not directly affect our health, such as water pipes, signs, clothing, furniture, shower curtains, textiles, stationery, insulation, diapers, medical equipment, etc. Nonetheless, we should always be knowledgeable about the materials and chemicals included in the products we buy, taking extra care on the ones that contain food and drinks.

 

H/T: healthy-holistic-living.com

 

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