Archive for the ‘Lincoln Press Release’ Category

Lincoln – 2018-19 – LED STREETLIGHT CONVERSION TO BEGIN MONDAY

Beginning Monday, October 8, Schneider Electric will begin replacing close to 27,000 of the City’s outdated high-pressure sodium and metal halide streetlights with light-emitting diode (LED) fixtures.  Installation will begin on arterial and collector streets, and the project is scheduled to be completed in one year.  Residents can find updated project schedules at lincoln.ne.gov (keyword:  led).

According to Frank Uhlarik, Sustainability and Compliance Manager for the City, the $12.2 million project is designed to improve safety and provide significant annual savings attributable to lower energy and maintenance costs. Under the City’s contract with an Energy Savings Company (ESCO) such as Schneider Electric, the energy and maintenance savings are guaranteed by the ESCO to help pay for the streetlight upgrades.

 

“We’re excited to further our commitment to sustainability and save taxpayer dollars,” said Mayor Chris Beutler.  “We will use the cost savings on this project to pay for the improvements, and then we’ll invest them in other important initiatives to make our community safer and more attractive to residents, businesses and visitors.”

Converting street lights to LED technology is one of the energy strategies identified in the Lincoln Environmental Action Plan, which was approved last year.  Uhlarik said the LED conversion project offers the following benefits:

  • LEDs offer improved light quality to improve visibility and safety.
  • LEDs are highly energy efficiency, which reduces energy consumption and the environmental impact.
  • LEDs have a longer lifespan compared to traditional street lamps, reducing maintenance costs.
  • LEDs improve aesthetics by creating a more uniform lighting experience throughout the City.

Uhlarik said the City will install two different LED fixtures, depending on location and function.  The two fixtures have different Kelvin numbers, which is the measure of color temperature emitted by a fixture. “Based on resident feedback regarding brightness, the lights installed in neighborhoods will be 3000 Kelvin, which appear to be less bright than the 4000 Kelvin fixtures installed on arterial streets,” he said.

 

Uhlarik said the LED conversion project will also have a positive environmental impact on the community by reducing the City’s annual kilowatt hours by 10.7 million and removing 3.9 million pounds of carbon from the atmosphere. This is equivalent to planting 180,891 trees or removing 1,224 cars from the road.  Additionally, Schneider Electric will recycle a majority of the materials from the existing street lights.

“We are proud to help the City of Lincoln undertake this critical infrastructure project that will dramatically improve safety for City residents and make a lasting positive impact on the environment,” said Tammy Fulop, Vice President, Schneider Electric.  “At Schneider Electric, we are committed to helping municipalities in the Midwest and beyond achieve their vision for infrastructure improvements and sustainability without burdening local taxpayers.”

For more information on the LED conversion project, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: conversion) or contact Uhlarik at fuhlarik.lincoln.ne.gov or 402-441-7588.  For more information on Schneider Electric, visit schneider-electric.us/enable.

Elevated Roundabout in Lincoln NE

Engineers have tweaked the design for a planned elevated roundabout at the southwestern Lincoln bottleneck of 14th Street, Old Cheney Road and Warlick Boulevard, providing drivers a better view of approaching traffic, beautifying the concrete walls and adding an underpass for cyclists and pedestrians on the Rock Island Trail.
Full story – http://journalstar.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/elevated-roundabout-design-for-th-old-cheney-gets-final-public/article_1de51613-002b-51e7-ba08-d85ebaffc3eb.html

Lincoln – New Recycling Locs for Cardboard

CITY INSTALLING ADDITIONAL CARDBOARD RECYCLING CONTAINERS AT LIBRARIES

Public cardboard drop-off sites increased to 32  

This week, the City is installing cardboard-only recycling containers in the parking lots of four City libraries.  As of April 1, clean and dry corrugated cardboard will no longer be accepted at the City landfill.  The library sites will be maintained for three to six months while the City evaluates residents’ recycling needs.  Cardboard-only recycling containers are available at these locations:

  • Walt Branch Library, 6701 S. 14th Street
  • Gere Branch Library, 2400 S. 56th Street
  • Anderson Branch Library, 3635 Touzalin Avenue
  • Eiseley Branch Library, 1530 Superior Street

The new locations are for cardboard recycling only.  Other recyclables must be taken to full service recycling sites.  The City has also doubled the cardboard capacity at all 28 full-service public recycling drop-off sites.  Residents may also subscribe to a curbside recycling service provided by a garbage or recycling collector.

Because public drop-off sites are sized to accommodate household recycling only, businesses should subscribe to a recycling service or deliver cardboard directly to a recycling processor.

As residents prepare for the change, City Recycling Coordinator Gene Hanlon said that in the first two months of 2018 cardboard recycling has increased 22 percent compared to the same period in 2017.  “Word about the City’s cardboard diversion program is definitely getting out,” Hanlon said.  “We’ve been monitoring use of our recycling sites, and we are ready to meet the anticipated increase in cardboard recycling.”

The City is promoting cardboard recycling with the “Take it to the Bin” educational campaign that encourages residents to start or expand their recycling efforts.  For more information on the campaign and on recycling cardboard and other materials, visit recycle.lincoln.ne.gov or call the City Recycling office at 402-441-8215.

Lincoln NE – Turn Lane Arrows – Traffic Signal Guide

Understanding the Signal for Your Turn Lane – The Arrows explained – Traffic Signal Guide –

Solid red arrow: STOP. No turns allowed. Do not enter the intersection to turn. Stop and wait until the signal changes.

Flashing yellow arrow: Yield, and turn when safe. Yield to oncoming traffic and pedestrians in the crosswalk; then turn. See back to learn more.

Solid yellow arrow: Prepare to stop. The signal will soon be red for turning traffic. If legally in the intersection, wait for a safe gap in oncoming traffic to complete the turn.

Solid green arrow: Turns allowed and protected. Turning traffic has the right of way. Oncoming traffic and pedestrians are stopped.

—- City of Lincoln Department of Public Works and Utilities. For more information, visit . traffic.lincoln.ne.gov

Safer, More Efficient Turn Signals. The City of Lincoln is upgrading its traffic signals and timings to enhance safety and traffic flow on major streets. As a result, intersections are using different arrow signals for turning traffic. Understanding the Signal for Your Turn Lane At many major intersections across Lincoln, arrow signals are used for both left and right turns. Studies show that arrow signals provide clearer instruction and result in fewer crashes.

Flashing Yellow Arrow: Turning Left

City of Lincoln

Yield, Then Turn

When turning left on a flashing yellow arrow,

drivers must yield

to

oncoming traffic and pedestrians in the crosswalk before turning.

Oncoming traffic

always

has a green signal and the right-of-way.

Flashing yellow arrows replace the traditional green ball when

turning left. A national study showed flashing yellow left-turn

arrows are more understandable to drivers. Lincoln’s upgraded

signals give drivers more opportunities to turn left and traffic

engineers more options to keep traffic moving at different

times of the day.

When turning left, if you get a flashing yellow arrow, remember:

pposing traffic always has a green signal and the right-of-way.

2. Always watch the signal for your turn lane  . . . not the signals or traffic in other lanes.

3. Pay attention!

» The order of signals changes depending on time of day and traffic conditions.

» Green arrows can occur before or after oncoming traffic.

4. Some intersections do not have green arrows based on traffic needs.

DID YOU KNOW ?  Flashing yellow arrows… were approved for use by Federal Highway Administration in 2006 reduce left-turning crashes by up to 25% minimize travel delays by providing more turning opportunities. Green Light Lincoln uses new traffic signal equipment, smart technologies, and new timing plans to improve safety and traffic flow on major streets. Visit

traffic.lincoln.ne.gov

(keyword: FYA).

in Lincoln – BURNING LEAVES AND YARD WASTE IS ILLEGAL

State law requires that grass and leaves be separated from household trash from April 1 until December 1, and the City reminds residents that burning leaves and yard waste is illegal within Lincoln City limits.  Those convicted of open burning are subject to a maximum fine of $500 and up to six months in jail.

Chris Schroeder, supervisor of the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) Air Quality Program, said that older adults and young children are especially sensitive to air pollution.  “Burning creates a fire hazard and produces air pollution that can lead to health complications for people with asthma, lung disease, other respiratory conditions or heart disease,” he said.

In Lincoln, separate collection of grass and leaves is provided by local waste haulers for a fee.  Those who do not subscribe to the special collection have three options:

  • Haul it to the North 48th Street Transfer Station, 5101 N. 48th St.  All loads must be covered and secured.
  • Hire a lawn service.
  • Mulch and compost grass clippings and leaves.

Grass and leaves must be placed in approved containers: paper yard waste bags available from retailers; 32-gallon containers with tight-fitting lids; or 95-gallon containers provided by waste haulers.  The City does not allow yard waste in plastic bags at the compost facility because the bags do not decompose and cause litter problems.  Residents can place their grass and leaves with their household trash from December 1 through March 31.  Tree limbs, garden waste and weeds may be included with regular household garbage year-round, but some refuse haulers require that limbs be cut to certain lengths and bundled.

More information on recycling is available at 402-441-8215 and recycle.lincoln.ne.gov.  More information on air quality regulations or open burning permits is available by contacting Schroeder at 402-441-6272 or cschroeder@lincoln.ne.gov.  For more information about LLCHD, visit health.lincoln.ne.gov.

FROZEN PIPES

PROTECT YOURSELF AGAINST FROZEN PIPES – With the arrival of cold temperatures, Lincoln Water System (LWS) reminds property owners to take steps to protect pipes from freezing and avoid costly damage or high water bills.  LWS officials say the most common problems involve lawn irrigation systems that have not been properly winterized.  The pipe or backflow device can freeze and break.  Pipes can also freeze along exterior walls, in poorly insulated structures and in unheated basements, crawl spaces, attached garages and cabinets.

LWS recommends the following precautions:

  • Properly drain and winterize lawn irrigation systems.
  • Remove hoses from exterior faucets.  Most newer homes have freeze-proof faucets which drain water when the hose is removed.  Older homes may have a valve inside the home that can be shut off.
  • Make sure all areas with plumbing are heated.  Space heaters should only be used according to manufacturer instructions and only when supervised.
  • If pipes are concealed in accessible spaces near exterior walls, open cabinet doors to allow warmer air to reach the pipes.
  • Heat tape should be installed according to manufacturer instructions or by a licensed plumber.
  • Running a small amount of water from a kitchen or bathroom faucet for short intervals will usually keep pipes from freezing.  About one cup of water every minute is recommended.
  • Locate the water shut-off valve in advance to allow immediate access if there is a leak or break in the plumbing system.  The valves are usually near the water meter.

If your pipes freeze, LWS recommends contacting a licensed plumber to locate the problem and safely thaw and repair any broken pipes.  Never use a flame or high heat device to thaw pipes as this may damage piping or cause a fire.

For more information on LWS, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: water).

Lincoln: Mayor’s Office OUTLINES BLUEPRINT FOR PROGRESS

Mayor Chris Beutler said Lincoln has become a world class city that can compete with “anyone, anytime, anywhere.”  And he said the community’s experience with Pinnacle Bank Arena and the West Haymarket has given it a “Blueprint for Progress” that will guide the City to more success.  The Mayor’s comments were part of his State of the City Address delivered this morning at a breakfast event organized by Leadership Lincoln.

“At the end of day, a Blueprint for Progress is only as good as the community that steps forward and accepts responsibility for creating change,” Beutler said.  “Over the last decade we have rediscovered that we have limitless possibilities when we come together and focus our talent and energy on a vision for the future.  That’s why the Pinnacle Bank Arena represents so much more to me than simply an entertainment venue.   It is a shining beacon of what we can accomplish when leadership, passion and purpose converge.  It gave us the confidence to take on new and bigger challenges in our quest to become a world class city. It taught us that when we work together, there are no obstacles too big to overcome and no boundaries to our collective imagination”

Beutler said the Blueprint for Progress includes four keys:

Economic investment – Mayor Beutler said projects like the Scheels expansion, the 9th and “O” development and the City Centre project demonstrate the importance and wise use of the City’s economic development tools.  “The message from these and dozens of other private public projects is simple,” he said.  “It’s the private sector risk takers and dreamers who make growth happen. When we have the public tools to support them, Lincoln wins.”

21st century education – “We must continue to partner with LPS, UNL, SCC, Wesleyan and all of the other educational institutions that maintain Lincoln’s key growth advantage – knowledge,” Beutler said.  He cited the City’s collaboration with LPS on the Community Learning Centers; the City’s work to provide all students with high-speed, wireless Internet service; UNL’s Innovation Campus, which builds the City’s reputation as a hub of the Silicon Prairie; and the need to provide all residents with lifelong learning opportunities through a modern library system.

Innovation – The City’s invested $700,000 from the Fast Forward Fund to create the Lincoln Broadband Project, which has already partnered with eight private telecommunications providers to improve access to next generation broadband and wireless infrastructure.  As a result, Beutler said, 10 new companies have opened offices in Lincoln; 400 new jobs have been created with over $20 million in new annual salaries; and $250 million has been invested in private broadband infrastructure over the past two years.  “Bold ideas like the Lincoln Broadband Project return exponential benefits to our citizens and inspire them to build more, dream bigger, and invest in their fellow citizens,” he said.

World class infrastructure – The City has increased spending on streets by 58 percent since 2010, but Beutler said more needs to be done.  “Several large economic development projects are slowed because we do not have the City funds needed to improve Rokeby Road, slowing development that will create good paying construction jobs and expand our tax base,” he said.  “The lesson is clear:  we miss critical opportunities when we don’t adequately fund our roads budget.”   The Mayor said he is confident the new Lincoln Citizens’ Transportation Coalition, a partnership with the Chamber of Commerce, will identify strategies to advance the City’s roads program over the next 20 years.

“The last decade has been a time of historic change in Lincoln,” Mayor Beutler said.  “The Blueprint for Progress has been the common thread to our successes, and we will continue to use it to drive the four key ideas that are building our future:  economic investment, a 21st century education, innovation and world class infrastructure.”

The breakfast also included the presentation of the Leadership Lincoln Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Marilyn Moore, who was an LPS teacher and administrator for 40 years.  The new Moore Middle School is named in her honor.  Moore also served as President of the Bryan College of Health Sciences and has been involved with many local organizations, including the Lincoln Children’s Museum, the Food Bank of Lincoln and the Lied Center Advisory Board.

Leadership Lincoln Executive Director Mick Hale also spoke on the State of Leadership Lincoln.  The organization has four programs – the Executive Series, the Fellows Program, Youth Leadership Lincoln and the Academy for Local Leadership (Project ALL).

The text of the State of the City Address will be available on the City website at lincoln.ne.gov.   The speech will also be aired on LNKTV City (Allo channel 2, Spectrum channel 1300 and Kinetic channel 5) and available through YouTube.

Source: InterLinc: City of Lincoln: Mayor’s Office: 2017 Media Releases

September

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