Archive for the ‘Lincoln Press Release’ Category

Feb 2018 – AGING PARTNERS OFFERS FREE FITNESS CLASSES

The public is invited to participate in Aging Partners’ “Feeling Fit” classes from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Fridays throughout February in the lower level of the Downtown Senior Center, 1005 “O” Street.  All classes are free and open to the public, and no registration is required.  Four different types of classes will be offered:

  • February 9 – Chair Tai Chi: This class is based on the modified Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance 8 Form program.  Participants are taught simple movements they can practice while sitting or standing near a chair.
  • February 16 – Chair Yoga: Poses are done while sitting or with a chair used for support during standing and balance poses.  Emphasis will be on breathing, balance and going at your own pace.  This class is suitable for all ages, fitness levels and physical conditions, and beginners are welcome.
  • February 23 – Chair Dance: This class is ideal for people with arthritis or limited mobility because of knee or hip issues.  This fun and upbeat class focuses on a unique combination of exercises and dance steps that isolate muscle groups and enhance flexibility.

 

More information about Aging Partners is available at aging.lincoln.ne.gov

1-24 – Lincoln BIKE SHARE PROGRAM

OPEN HOUSE FOR BIKE SHARE PROGRAM IS JANUARY 24
The public is invited to an open house Wednesday, January 24, on phase one of BikeLNK, a community bike share service that begins this spring.  The event is from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the third-floor auditorium of the Bennett Martin Public Library, 136 South 14th Street.

The BikeLNK service will make 100 bikes available at 19 locations in downtown Lincoln and on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campuses.  The public can access the bikes by purchasing passes that can be used at bike station kiosks or through a mobile app or website.  The passes range from a single trip to a one-year membership.

The program is funded through private sponsorships and donations and a Federal Highway Administration Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program grant administered by the Nebraska Department of Transportation.

At the open house, the public will have the opportunity to view current maps and provide feedback.  No formal presentations are planned.  City staff and representatives of BCycle bike sharing company and Heartland Bike Share of Omaha will be available for questions and comments.

For more information, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: bike share) or contact Kellee Van Bruggen, Lincoln-Lancaster Planning Department, 402-441-6363, kvanbruggen@lincoln.ne.gov or Zach Becker, Public Works and Utilities Department, 402-613-3763, zbecker@lincoln.ne.gov.

Jan 2018 – Lincoln NATURE CENTER JANUARY PROGRAMS

 

The Pioneers Park Nature Center invites the public to the following events in January:

Coffee and Conversations: Local Birding by Ruth Stearns – Thursday, January 11, 2 to 4 p.m.  Coffee and tea are provided. The suggested donation is $5.

Preschool Open House – Tuesday, January 16, 10 to 10:45 a.m.  Parents will learn how building with sticks, counting pinecones and crafting with leaves and seeds can become a part of your child’s educational experience.  The Nature Center offers a preschool program for ages 3 to 4 and a pre-kindergarten program for ages 4 to 5. Registration for the 2018-19 school year begins February 1. The event is for adults only.  In case of inclement weather, the open house will be rescheduled to January 23.

Winter Recreation Workshop: Cross Country Skiing – Saturday, January 20, 2 to 4 p.m.  Led by Outdoor Adventures from the University of Nebraska, this workshop is for those with no cross country skiing experience and those looking to improve their skills.  If the weather is not ideal for skiing, the workshop will be held indoors, and all participants will receive a coupon for ski rental from Outdoor Adventures.  The class is recommended for those age 12 and up.  Children must be accompanied by an adult. The fee is $20 per person and includes ski rental.  The registration deadline is January 17.

Friends of Pioneers Park Nature Center Annual Meeting – Saturday, January 27, 9 to 11 a.m.  Learn more about this support organization and enjoy refreshments, conversation and two presentations.  Photographer Adrian Olivera will present “Nebraska’s Unique Landscape Time-Lapse,” and Bob Hendrickson with the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum will present “Landscapes Planted for a Purpose.”

 

To register for these programs or other activities, contact the Nature Center at 402-441-7895 or visit parks.lincoln.ne.gov and select the “register online” button.  For more information, contact the Nature Center at 402-441-7895 or visit parks.lincoln.ne.gov/naturecenter.

PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT
Pioneers Park Nature Center, 3201 S. Coddington Ave., Lincoln, NE 68522, 402-441-7895

Roads to Lee’s Chicken open now

CODDINGTON AVENUE AND WEST VAN DORN INTERSECTION NOW OPEN

All lanes at the intersection of S. Coddington Avenue and West Van Dorn Street are now open.  Construction on the safety improvement project has been temporarily stopped for winter and will resume in spring, 2018.

The project is designed to reduce vehicle crashes by converting the two-way, stop sign-controlled intersection into a single-lane roundabout.  Other improvements include repairing and rebuilding adjacent sidewalks, trails and box culvert extensions, and installing a new storm drainage system and street lights.

Phase One construction on S. Coddington Ave. south of Van Dorn St. was completed in September.  Phase Two construction on S. Coddington Ave. heading north of Van Dorn St. is 50 percent complete and scheduled to be finished in mid-2018, along with Phases Three and Four on Van Dorn St., east and west of S. Coddington Ave.

 

At least three legs of the intersection will remain open throughout the construction in 2018. Detour routes will continue to be posted on the project website.  Access to adjacent businesses and homes will be maintained at all times.

The Public Works and Utilities Department appreciates the public’s patience during construction

in Lincoln – BURNING LEAVES AND YARD WASTE IS ILLEGAL

State law requires that grass and leaves be separated from household trash from April 1 until December 1, and the City reminds residents that burning leaves and yard waste is illegal within Lincoln City limits.  Those convicted of open burning are subject to a maximum fine of $500 and up to six months in jail.

Chris Schroeder, supervisor of the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) Air Quality Program, said that older adults and young children are especially sensitive to air pollution.  “Burning creates a fire hazard and produces air pollution that can lead to health complications for people with asthma, lung disease, other respiratory conditions or heart disease,” he said.

In Lincoln, separate collection of grass and leaves is provided by local waste haulers for a fee.  Those who do not subscribe to the special collection have three options:

  • Haul it to the North 48th Street Transfer Station, 5101 N. 48th St.  All loads must be covered and secured.
  • Hire a lawn service.
  • Mulch and compost grass clippings and leaves.

Grass and leaves must be placed in approved containers: paper yard waste bags available from retailers; 32-gallon containers with tight-fitting lids; or 95-gallon containers provided by waste haulers.  The City does not allow yard waste in plastic bags at the compost facility because the bags do not decompose and cause litter problems.  Residents can place their grass and leaves with their household trash from December 1 through March 31.  Tree limbs, garden waste and weeds may be included with regular household garbage year-round, but some refuse haulers require that limbs be cut to certain lengths and bundled.

More information on recycling is available at 402-441-8215 and recycle.lincoln.ne.gov.  More information on air quality regulations or open burning permits is available by contacting Schroeder at 402-441-6272 or cschroeder@lincoln.ne.gov.  For more information about LLCHD, visit health.lincoln.ne.gov.

FROZEN PIPES

PROTECT YOURSELF AGAINST FROZEN PIPES – With the arrival of cold temperatures, Lincoln Water System (LWS) reminds property owners to take steps to protect pipes from freezing and avoid costly damage or high water bills.  LWS officials say the most common problems involve lawn irrigation systems that have not been properly winterized.  The pipe or backflow device can freeze and break.  Pipes can also freeze along exterior walls, in poorly insulated structures and in unheated basements, crawl spaces, attached garages and cabinets.

LWS recommends the following precautions:

  • Properly drain and winterize lawn irrigation systems.
  • Remove hoses from exterior faucets.  Most newer homes have freeze-proof faucets which drain water when the hose is removed.  Older homes may have a valve inside the home that can be shut off.
  • Make sure all areas with plumbing are heated.  Space heaters should only be used according to manufacturer instructions and only when supervised.
  • If pipes are concealed in accessible spaces near exterior walls, open cabinet doors to allow warmer air to reach the pipes.
  • Heat tape should be installed according to manufacturer instructions or by a licensed plumber.
  • Running a small amount of water from a kitchen or bathroom faucet for short intervals will usually keep pipes from freezing.  About one cup of water every minute is recommended.
  • Locate the water shut-off valve in advance to allow immediate access if there is a leak or break in the plumbing system.  The valves are usually near the water meter.

If your pipes freeze, LWS recommends contacting a licensed plumber to locate the problem and safely thaw and repair any broken pipes.  Never use a flame or high heat device to thaw pipes as this may damage piping or cause a fire.

For more information on LWS, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: water).

Lincoln: Mayor’s Office OUTLINES BLUEPRINT FOR PROGRESS

Mayor Chris Beutler said Lincoln has become a world class city that can compete with “anyone, anytime, anywhere.”  And he said the community’s experience with Pinnacle Bank Arena and the West Haymarket has given it a “Blueprint for Progress” that will guide the City to more success.  The Mayor’s comments were part of his State of the City Address delivered this morning at a breakfast event organized by Leadership Lincoln.

“At the end of day, a Blueprint for Progress is only as good as the community that steps forward and accepts responsibility for creating change,” Beutler said.  “Over the last decade we have rediscovered that we have limitless possibilities when we come together and focus our talent and energy on a vision for the future.  That’s why the Pinnacle Bank Arena represents so much more to me than simply an entertainment venue.   It is a shining beacon of what we can accomplish when leadership, passion and purpose converge.  It gave us the confidence to take on new and bigger challenges in our quest to become a world class city. It taught us that when we work together, there are no obstacles too big to overcome and no boundaries to our collective imagination”

Beutler said the Blueprint for Progress includes four keys:

Economic investment – Mayor Beutler said projects like the Scheels expansion, the 9th and “O” development and the City Centre project demonstrate the importance and wise use of the City’s economic development tools.  “The message from these and dozens of other private public projects is simple,” he said.  “It’s the private sector risk takers and dreamers who make growth happen. When we have the public tools to support them, Lincoln wins.”

21st century education – “We must continue to partner with LPS, UNL, SCC, Wesleyan and all of the other educational institutions that maintain Lincoln’s key growth advantage – knowledge,” Beutler said.  He cited the City’s collaboration with LPS on the Community Learning Centers; the City’s work to provide all students with high-speed, wireless Internet service; UNL’s Innovation Campus, which builds the City’s reputation as a hub of the Silicon Prairie; and the need to provide all residents with lifelong learning opportunities through a modern library system.

Innovation – The City’s invested $700,000 from the Fast Forward Fund to create the Lincoln Broadband Project, which has already partnered with eight private telecommunications providers to improve access to next generation broadband and wireless infrastructure.  As a result, Beutler said, 10 new companies have opened offices in Lincoln; 400 new jobs have been created with over $20 million in new annual salaries; and $250 million has been invested in private broadband infrastructure over the past two years.  “Bold ideas like the Lincoln Broadband Project return exponential benefits to our citizens and inspire them to build more, dream bigger, and invest in their fellow citizens,” he said.

World class infrastructure – The City has increased spending on streets by 58 percent since 2010, but Beutler said more needs to be done.  “Several large economic development projects are slowed because we do not have the City funds needed to improve Rokeby Road, slowing development that will create good paying construction jobs and expand our tax base,” he said.  “The lesson is clear:  we miss critical opportunities when we don’t adequately fund our roads budget.”   The Mayor said he is confident the new Lincoln Citizens’ Transportation Coalition, a partnership with the Chamber of Commerce, will identify strategies to advance the City’s roads program over the next 20 years.

“The last decade has been a time of historic change in Lincoln,” Mayor Beutler said.  “The Blueprint for Progress has been the common thread to our successes, and we will continue to use it to drive the four key ideas that are building our future:  economic investment, a 21st century education, innovation and world class infrastructure.”

The breakfast also included the presentation of the Leadership Lincoln Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Marilyn Moore, who was an LPS teacher and administrator for 40 years.  The new Moore Middle School is named in her honor.  Moore also served as President of the Bryan College of Health Sciences and has been involved with many local organizations, including the Lincoln Children’s Museum, the Food Bank of Lincoln and the Lied Center Advisory Board.

Leadership Lincoln Executive Director Mick Hale also spoke on the State of Leadership Lincoln.  The organization has four programs – the Executive Series, the Fellows Program, Youth Leadership Lincoln and the Academy for Local Leadership (Project ALL).

The text of the State of the City Address will be available on the City website at lincoln.ne.gov.   The speech will also be aired on LNKTV City (Allo channel 2, Spectrum channel 1300 and Kinetic channel 5) and available through YouTube.

Source: InterLinc: City of Lincoln: Mayor’s Office: 2017 Media Releases

September

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