Archive for the ‘Lincoln Press Release’ Category

in Lincoln – BURNING LEAVES AND YARD WASTE IS ILLEGAL

State law requires that grass and leaves be separated from household trash from April 1 until December 1, and the City reminds residents that burning leaves and yard waste is illegal within Lincoln City limits.  Those convicted of open burning are subject to a maximum fine of $500 and up to six months in jail.

Chris Schroeder, supervisor of the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) Air Quality Program, said that older adults and young children are especially sensitive to air pollution.  “Burning creates a fire hazard and produces air pollution that can lead to health complications for people with asthma, lung disease, other respiratory conditions or heart disease,” he said.

In Lincoln, separate collection of grass and leaves is provided by local waste haulers for a fee.  Those who do not subscribe to the special collection have three options:

  • Haul it to the North 48th Street Transfer Station, 5101 N. 48th St.  All loads must be covered and secured.
  • Hire a lawn service.
  • Mulch and compost grass clippings and leaves.

Grass and leaves must be placed in approved containers: paper yard waste bags available from retailers; 32-gallon containers with tight-fitting lids; or 95-gallon containers provided by waste haulers.  The City does not allow yard waste in plastic bags at the compost facility because the bags do not decompose and cause litter problems.  Residents can place their grass and leaves with their household trash from December 1 through March 31.  Tree limbs, garden waste and weeds may be included with regular household garbage year-round, but some refuse haulers require that limbs be cut to certain lengths and bundled.

More information on recycling is available at 402-441-8215 and recycle.lincoln.ne.gov.  More information on air quality regulations or open burning permits is available by contacting Schroeder at 402-441-6272 or cschroeder@lincoln.ne.gov.  For more information about LLCHD, visit health.lincoln.ne.gov.

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FROZEN PIPES

PROTECT YOURSELF AGAINST FROZEN PIPES – With the arrival of cold temperatures, Lincoln Water System (LWS) reminds property owners to take steps to protect pipes from freezing and avoid costly damage or high water bills.  LWS officials say the most common problems involve lawn irrigation systems that have not been properly winterized.  The pipe or backflow device can freeze and break.  Pipes can also freeze along exterior walls, in poorly insulated structures and in unheated basements, crawl spaces, attached garages and cabinets.

LWS recommends the following precautions:

  • Properly drain and winterize lawn irrigation systems.
  • Remove hoses from exterior faucets.  Most newer homes have freeze-proof faucets which drain water when the hose is removed.  Older homes may have a valve inside the home that can be shut off.
  • Make sure all areas with plumbing are heated.  Space heaters should only be used according to manufacturer instructions and only when supervised.
  • If pipes are concealed in accessible spaces near exterior walls, open cabinet doors to allow warmer air to reach the pipes.
  • Heat tape should be installed according to manufacturer instructions or by a licensed plumber.
  • Running a small amount of water from a kitchen or bathroom faucet for short intervals will usually keep pipes from freezing.  About one cup of water every minute is recommended.
  • Locate the water shut-off valve in advance to allow immediate access if there is a leak or break in the plumbing system.  The valves are usually near the water meter.

If your pipes freeze, LWS recommends contacting a licensed plumber to locate the problem and safely thaw and repair any broken pipes.  Never use a flame or high heat device to thaw pipes as this may damage piping or cause a fire.

For more information on LWS, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: water).

Lincoln: Mayor’s Office OUTLINES BLUEPRINT FOR PROGRESS

Mayor Chris Beutler said Lincoln has become a world class city that can compete with “anyone, anytime, anywhere.”  And he said the community’s experience with Pinnacle Bank Arena and the West Haymarket has given it a “Blueprint for Progress” that will guide the City to more success.  The Mayor’s comments were part of his State of the City Address delivered this morning at a breakfast event organized by Leadership Lincoln.

“At the end of day, a Blueprint for Progress is only as good as the community that steps forward and accepts responsibility for creating change,” Beutler said.  “Over the last decade we have rediscovered that we have limitless possibilities when we come together and focus our talent and energy on a vision for the future.  That’s why the Pinnacle Bank Arena represents so much more to me than simply an entertainment venue.   It is a shining beacon of what we can accomplish when leadership, passion and purpose converge.  It gave us the confidence to take on new and bigger challenges in our quest to become a world class city. It taught us that when we work together, there are no obstacles too big to overcome and no boundaries to our collective imagination”

Beutler said the Blueprint for Progress includes four keys:

Economic investment – Mayor Beutler said projects like the Scheels expansion, the 9th and “O” development and the City Centre project demonstrate the importance and wise use of the City’s economic development tools.  “The message from these and dozens of other private public projects is simple,” he said.  “It’s the private sector risk takers and dreamers who make growth happen. When we have the public tools to support them, Lincoln wins.”

21st century education – “We must continue to partner with LPS, UNL, SCC, Wesleyan and all of the other educational institutions that maintain Lincoln’s key growth advantage – knowledge,” Beutler said.  He cited the City’s collaboration with LPS on the Community Learning Centers; the City’s work to provide all students with high-speed, wireless Internet service; UNL’s Innovation Campus, which builds the City’s reputation as a hub of the Silicon Prairie; and the need to provide all residents with lifelong learning opportunities through a modern library system.

Innovation – The City’s invested $700,000 from the Fast Forward Fund to create the Lincoln Broadband Project, which has already partnered with eight private telecommunications providers to improve access to next generation broadband and wireless infrastructure.  As a result, Beutler said, 10 new companies have opened offices in Lincoln; 400 new jobs have been created with over $20 million in new annual salaries; and $250 million has been invested in private broadband infrastructure over the past two years.  “Bold ideas like the Lincoln Broadband Project return exponential benefits to our citizens and inspire them to build more, dream bigger, and invest in their fellow citizens,” he said.

World class infrastructure – The City has increased spending on streets by 58 percent since 2010, but Beutler said more needs to be done.  “Several large economic development projects are slowed because we do not have the City funds needed to improve Rokeby Road, slowing development that will create good paying construction jobs and expand our tax base,” he said.  “The lesson is clear:  we miss critical opportunities when we don’t adequately fund our roads budget.”   The Mayor said he is confident the new Lincoln Citizens’ Transportation Coalition, a partnership with the Chamber of Commerce, will identify strategies to advance the City’s roads program over the next 20 years.

“The last decade has been a time of historic change in Lincoln,” Mayor Beutler said.  “The Blueprint for Progress has been the common thread to our successes, and we will continue to use it to drive the four key ideas that are building our future:  economic investment, a 21st century education, innovation and world class infrastructure.”

The breakfast also included the presentation of the Leadership Lincoln Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Marilyn Moore, who was an LPS teacher and administrator for 40 years.  The new Moore Middle School is named in her honor.  Moore also served as President of the Bryan College of Health Sciences and has been involved with many local organizations, including the Lincoln Children’s Museum, the Food Bank of Lincoln and the Lied Center Advisory Board.

Leadership Lincoln Executive Director Mick Hale also spoke on the State of Leadership Lincoln.  The organization has four programs – the Executive Series, the Fellows Program, Youth Leadership Lincoln and the Academy for Local Leadership (Project ALL).

The text of the State of the City Address will be available on the City website at lincoln.ne.gov.   The speech will also be aired on LNKTV City (Allo channel 2, Spectrum channel 1300 and Kinetic channel 5) and available through YouTube.

Source: InterLinc: City of Lincoln: Mayor’s Office: 2017 Media Releases

September

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Lincoln Libraries to Assist with Job Searches

LINCOLN CITY LIBRARIES PROVIDES JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE

Lincoln City Libraries and the Prosper Lincoln invite the public to a series of programs to help people find jobs that lead to full-time careers. Volunteers trained by Prosper Lincoln will help job seekers find and correctly apply for positions online.  No registration or appointments are required.
The program is available at the following locations:
·        Bennett Martin Public Library, 136 S. 14th St. – Tuesdays, noon to 2 p.m. and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
·        Eiseley Branch Library, 1530 Superior Street – Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Prosper Lincoln is a shared community agenda focusing on improving early childhood, employment skills and innovation and entrepreneurship in Lincoln.
For information on the resources available at Lincoln City Libraries, visit lincolnlibraries.org.  For information about Prosper Lincoln, visit prosperlincoln.org.

Road Repairs – LINCOLN ON THE MOVE

This is a Long post with lots of details.              

Mayor Chris Beutler today said the record pace of street construction, repair and maintenance will continue this year, with a goal of adding 2.6 miles of new arterials, 10.3 miles of arterial improvements and 427 blocks of residential rehabilitation.  And he said the “Lincoln on the Move” initiative is helping to build a “leading edge” community.  (A list of the major projects follows this release.)  
“Our transportation network is fundamental to the future of our City,” Mayor Beutler said.  “It’s how we will keep moving Lincoln ahead economically, moving Lincoln forward to maintain livable neighborhoods, moving Lincoln in the right direction on safety and convenience, and moving Lincoln to the top of those national lists for our business climate and quality of life.”
Beutler said the City’s transportation team uses smart planning and communication to coordinate the large amount of both public and private construction activity across the community.  Miki Esposito, Director of the Public Works and Utilities Department, said the work begins months and even years ahead of construction.
“There are many steps and many people involved in that planning and coordination,” Esposito said.  “We explore whether the project requires more than one construction season; which stakeholders, utility companies, institutions or agencies need to be informed of the project; when is the proper time for construction; and how the project impacts other transportation movements, closures or detours in the City.”
Esposito said a weekly “huddle” meeting brings the City transportation team together with utilities and private entities to look at all the projects under way.  They look at closures, detours and whether different types of work can be done at the same time.  The huddle group also coordinates the public information needed for the projects.  For the current 16th Street project, for example, the City mailed 380 letters, distributed over 200 door hangers, held public meetings, partnered with the neighborhood association, installed message boards and updated information on the website.  Beutler and Esposito encouraged the public to stay informed on construction activities by visiting lincoln.ne.gov (keywords: projects and closures)

Another example of coordination, Esposito said, is the restructuring of right of way management, consolidating all the functions into a single unit.
“Most people drive, walk or bike every day without realizing the huge underground infrastructure network beneath them — water lines, fiber optic, gas pipes, electric lines, phone, cable and more,” she said.  “When construction occurs, it is necessary to locate all of that underground infrastructure in order to avoid hitting them. The new cross-trained team takes advantage of asset management software to map what is located underground and share that data with both the City team and the private sector.”
In addition to street work, the City will also be working on other infrastructure projects including sidewalk repair.   (A list of the major projects follows this release.)  
Through our Green Light Lincoln program, we are upgrading traffic signal systems with smart technology that keeps traffic moving more safely and efficiently,” he said.  “Our right of way team is helping private contractors install miles of new fiber optics to bring high speed broadband service to every business and home across the community.  It all comes together as ‘Lincoln on the Move,’ our program specifically engineered to get Lincoln residents – as well as goods and services – where they need to go safely and conveniently.”

 
KEY PROJECTS PLANNED FOR 2017

Northwest
·      11th Street water main replacement from “O” to “Q” streets
·      N. 10th Street over Salt Creek north of Military Road – bridge replacement and new sidewalk with trail connection
·      14th and Superior roundabout – permanent safety improvements
·      S. 27th Street water main replacement from Laurel to Calvert streets and from Woods Blvd. to Kessler Blvd.
·      N. 27th Street rehabilitation from Holdrege Street to Fletcher Ave.
·      27th Street interchange at Interstate 80 – bridge and concrete repairs
Southwest
·      16th Street reconstruction from “A” to “F” streets
·      “D” Street water main replacement from 12th to 20th streets
·      20th and Calvert streets drainage system replacement
·      Jackson Drive/Woodsdale Blvd. from 27th to 29th streets –  drainage system rehabilitation
·      S. Coddington and W. Van Dorn intersection safety project – construction of single-lane roundabout and new sidewalks
Northeast
·      33rd Street from Holdrege to Madison – road rehabilitation and storm drainage improvements
·      Fletcher Ave. water main replacement from 56th to 60th streets
·      Superior Street rehabilitation from 27th Street to Cornhusker Hwy.
·      56th and Morton drainage improvement project – channel widening and replacement of box culvert
·      Adams Street wastewater pipeline installation from 41st to 42nd streets
·      Fremont Street water main replacement from Touzalin Ave. to 70th Street
·      56th and Colfax drainage improvements
·      Cleveland Ave. water main replacement from Cotner Blvd. to Leonard Street
·      98th Street and Boathouse to “O” Street and Anthony Lane – wastewater pipeline installation
·      Anthony Lane wastewater pipeline installation from “O” Street to YMCA Spirit Park
Southeast
·      S. 44th Street wastewater pipeline rehabilitation and replacement from High Street to Antelope Creek Road
·      44th Street drainage improvements from Calvert to High streets
·      84th and Old Cheney bike path underpass rehabilitation
·      Old Cheney rehabilitation from  40th St. to Hwy. 2
·      Normal Blvd. rehabilitation from South to 56th streets
·      South Sumner wastewater pipeline rehabilitation and replacement from  Normal Blvd. to 40th Street
·      Jefferson Ave. wastewater pipeline rehabilitation and replacement from Ryons to Garfield streets
·      Beal Slough trunk sewer installation from 33rd to 56th streets
·      Yankee Hill Rd. reconstruction and widening from 70th Street to Hwy. 2 and installation of roundabouts

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
555 S. 10th Street, Lincoln, NE  68508, 402-441-7511

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