Archive for the ‘Learning New Things’ Category

Using cash to travel may soon be obsolete – by Steve Glenn

This past weekend I was in New York City and was surprised that two shops we visited did not accept CASH! Usually, I hear retailers say they don’t accept credit cards as they don’t want to pay the fees to accept them. When I visited an ice cream shop on Friday night and the person behind the register said “Sorry, we don’t accept CASH,” my jaw dropped. When I thought through the process for a while it made more sense. If a store does not accept cash, they don’t have to worry about A) Being robbed as they have no cash. B) Having employees stick cash sales in their pocket without ringing it through the cash register. This all points to how fast the business world is changing toward a cashless society. Ironically with all the new disruptive technology, I think that in the next 3 years we will move from credit cards to the next form of electronic payment that is blockchain or cryptocurrency based.

Copyright © 2018 Executive Travel
Our address is 1212 O Street, Lincoln, NE 68508

Social Security Depletion Year Remains 2034

This is hard to follow but is official… -Keith ——-

Tuesday, June 5, 2018
For Immediate Release
Social Security Administration Seal

 

Mark Hinkle, Acting Press Officer
press.office@ssa.gov

 

News Release
SOCIAL SECURITY

 

Social Security Combined Trust Fund Reserves Depletion Year Remains 2034 Says Board of Trustees

Disability Fund Improves by Four Years

The Social Security Board of Trustees today released its annual report on the long-term financial status of the Social Security Trust Funds. The combined asset reserves of the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance (OASDI) Trust Funds are projected to become depleted in 2034, the same as projected last year, with 79 percent of benefits payable at that time.

The OASI Trust Fund is projected to become depleted in late 2034, as compared to last year’s estimate of early 2035, with 77 percent of benefits payable at that time. The DI Trust Fund will become depleted in 2032, extended from last year’s estimate of 2028, with 96 percent of benefits still payable.

In the 2018 Annual Report to Congress, the Trustees announced:

  • The asset reserves of the combined OASDI Trust Funds increased by $44 billion in 2017 to a total of $2.89 trillion.
  • The total annual cost of the program is projected to exceed total annual income in 2018 for the first time since 1982, and remain higher throughout the 75-year projection period. As a result, asset reserves are expected to decline during 2018. Social Security’s cost has exceeded its non-interest income since 2010.
  • The year when the combined trust fund reserves are projected to become depleted, if Congress does not act before then, is 2034 – the same as projected last year. At that time, there will be sufficient income coming in to pay 79 percent of scheduled benefits.

“The Trustees’ projected depletion date of the combined Social Security Trust Funds has not changed, and slightly more than three-fourths of benefits would still be payable after depletion,” said Nancy A. Berryhill, Acting Commissioner of Social Security. “But the fact remains that Congress can keep Social Security strong by taking action to ensure the future of the program.”

Other highlights of the Trustees Report include:

  • Total income, including interest, to the combined OASDI Trust Funds amounted to $997 billion in 2017. ($874 billion from net payroll tax contributions, $38 billion from taxation of benefits, and $85 billion in interest)
  • Total expenditures from the combined OASDI Trust Funds amounted to more than $952 billion in 2017.
  • Social Security paid benefits of more than $941 billion in calendar year 2017. There were about 62 million beneficiaries at the end of the calendar year.
  • The projected actuarial deficit over the 75-year long-range period is 2.84 percent of taxable payroll – slightly larger than the 2.83 percent projected in last year’s report.
  • During 2017, an estimated 174 million people had earnings covered by Social Security and paid payroll taxes.
  • The cost of $6.5 billion to administer the Social Security program in 2017 was a very low 0.7 percent of total expenditures.
  • The combined Trust Fund asset reserves earned interest at an effective annual rate of 3.0 percent in 2017.

The Board of Trustees usually comprises six members. Four serve by virtue of their positions with the federal government: Steven T. Mnuchin, Secretary of the Treasury and Managing Trustee; Nancy A. Berryhill, Acting Commissioner of Social Security; Alex M. Azar II, Secretary of Health and Human Services; and R. Alexander Acosta, Secretary of Labor. The two public trustee positions are currently vacant.

View the 2018 Trustees Report at www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/TR/2018/.

# # #

 

To get more Social Security news, follow the Press Office on Twitter @SSAPress.

 

 

This press release was produced and disseminated at U.S. taxpayer expense.

 

To ensure this content makes it to your inbox in the future, please add this email address to your address book.
This communication was produced and disseminated at U.S. taxpayer expense.

8 Habits to Help Reduce Arthritis Symptoms

According to the Center for Disease Control & Prevention, 54 million adult Americans suffer from arthritis. It’s not just the one disease either, but rather a collection of 100 conditions that affect the joints, causing stiffness, swelling, and pain. Though you can’t always prevent it, there are some things you can do to help reduce your arthritis symptoms if you have it. Below you’ll find 8 of them!

For details click here —> http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=29741

Summary only
1. Keep Your Weight in Check
2. Sip Green Tea

3. Drink Baking Soda – Recent research suggests that a daily dose of water and baking soda can help to combat inflammatory diseases.

4. Run a Little – Pounding the sidewalk surprisingly helps to protect joints, most likely because the activity helps people to maintain a healthy weight.

6. Eat a Rainbow

7. Schedule Workouts

8. Set a Bedtime

Live Well Go Fish Nets $6,690.55

Live Well Go Fish

We help seniors, youth, veterans, and people with disabilities experience the fun of boating, fishing, kite flying, and bird watching aboard a wheelchair accessible pontoon boat.

$6,690.55

Elevated Roundabout in Lincoln NE

Engineers have tweaked the design for a planned elevated roundabout at the southwestern Lincoln bottleneck of 14th Street, Old Cheney Road and Warlick Boulevard, providing drivers a better view of approaching traffic, beautifying the concrete walls and adding an underpass for cyclists and pedestrians on the Rock Island Trail.
Full story – http://journalstar.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/elevated-roundabout-design-for-th-old-cheney-gets-final-public/article_1de51613-002b-51e7-ba08-d85ebaffc3eb.html

TECHNIQUE DOUBLES CONVERSION OF CO2 TO PLASTIC COMPONENT

Very exciting news unless there are unintended consequences. “The conversion of CO2 is very important to help offset the emissions that lead to global warming
TECHNIQUE DOUBLES CONVERSION OF CO2 TO PLASTIC COMPONENT
Lincoln, Nebraska, May 22, 2018 – Fossil fuels have long been the precursor to plastic, but new research from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and European collaborators could help send that era up in smoke — carbon dioxide, to be exact.
Produced almost entirely from burning fossil fuels, carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere have risen from 280 parts per million in the pre-industrial era to about 410 PPM today. That trend, combined with the finite supply of fossil fuels, has pushed researchers to explore methods for producing plastic from CO2 rather than petroleum or natural gas — recycling CO2 just as plastic is now.
“The conversion of CO2 is very important to help offset the emissions that lead to global warming and other detrimental processes in the environment,” said Alexandrov, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

More —> https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/technique-doubles-conversion-of-co2-to-plastic-component/

Multigenerational Travel: Tips for Seniors and Their Families

Posted On 11 May 2018 By : 
Although it can come with its challenges, multigenerational travel is well worth the effort. This type of travel gives you the opportunity to create lifelong memories with your family and leave a lasting legacy for your children and grandchildren.

Multigenerational Travel: Tips for Seniors and Their Families

Read our multigenerational travel tips for seniors and their families.

Full article here –

https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/multigenerational-travel-tips-for-seniors/

%d bloggers like this: