Archive for the ‘Learning New Things’ Category

DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION LAUNCHES COMPREHENSIVE DEMENTIA CARE PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS
Recommendations Emphasize High Quality, Person-Centered Care in Long-Term and Community-Based
OMAHA, January 19, 2018 – Yesterday, the Alzheimer’s Association released new dementia care practice recommendations aimed at helping nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and other long-term care and community care providers deliver optimal quality, person-centered care for those living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. The recommendations are posted online today and will be published as a supplement to the February issue of The Gerontologist.
The Alzheimer’s Association 2018 Dementia Care Practice Recommendations outline 56 recommendations across 10 content areas, grounded in the fundamentals of person-centered care. They were developed by 27 dementia care experts convened by the Alzheimer’s Association and are based on a comprehensive review of current evidence, best practice, and expert opinion.
The recommendations seek to better define quality care across all care settings, and throughout the disease course. They are intended for professional care providers who work with individuals living with dementia and their families in long-term and community-based care settings.
“Since its inception, the Alzheimer’s Association has been a leader in outlining principles and practices of quality care for individuals living with dementia,” said Sam Fazio, Ph.D., lead author and Director of Quality Care and Psychosocial Research, Alzheimer’s Association. “These recommendations reflect the most current research and best practices to help ensure high-quality, person-centered care for people living with Alzheimer’s in long-term and community-based settings.”
It is estimated that nearly 60 percent of older adults with Alzheimer’s or other dementias reside in the community (outside a hospital or clinical setting). About 25 percent of these individuals live alone, but the remainder receives care from family members, unpaid caregivers, and community-based and residential care providers. By age 80, 75 percent of people with Alzheimer’s dementia are admitted to a nursing home. The new recommendations are aimed at guiding care in these settings.
In addition to updating and enhancing previous recommendations in areas familiar to the dementia care community, the recommendations break important new ground. Most notably, the recommendations offer guidance to community-based and residential care providers on detection and diagnosis and ongoing medical management — topic areas typically reserved for clinicians. Recommendations in these two areas are written specifically for non-physician care providers and address what these providers can do to help with these important aspects of holistic, person-centered dementia care.
“Detection and diagnosis, and medical management are critical, vital areas of care. While clinicians must continue to take a lead role in these areas, there are important contributions dementia care providers can make to improve outcomes in these areas,” Fazio said. “Our recommendations outline appropriate actions dementia care providers can make to complement and enhance the work clinicians are doing. Having both groups focus on these critical areas will result in better care for people struggling with this disease.”
Other areas covered by the recommendations include:
  • Fundamentals of person-centered care
  • Assessment and care planning
  • Information, education and support
  • Ongoing care for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia
  • Support of activities in daily living
  • Staffing
  • Supportive and therapeutic environments
The 56 recommendations are detailed in 10 area-specific articles published in the February supplement. In addition to providing greater details about each recommendation, the articles provide evidence and expert opinion supporting each recommendation. All 10 articles and an overview article summarizing all the recommendations appear online for the first time yesterday.
The Alzheimer’s Association will share the recommendations with policymakers and the dementia care community formally during a Capitol Hill event on February 14 with special guest remarks by Senator Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.).  Dementia care experts who developed the recommendations will provide deeper context and explanation behind the new recommendations.
There are an estimated 5.5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease today. It is the sixth-leading cause of death, and the only disease among the top 10 causes of death that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s is projected to reach nearly 14 million by 2050, unless more effective treatments are advanced. For more information on the recommendations, visit alz.org/practicerecommendations.
Alzheimer’s Association®
The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit alz.org.
The Alzheimer’s Association Nebraska Chapter serves all 93 counties in Nebraska.  In addition to offering free education and support services, the Chapter also raises money for local and national research efforts through the Walk to End Alzheimer’s and The Longest Day events.  Staff and volunteers also work together to encourage state legislators to make Alzheimer’s disease a priority in the state by increasing funding for the disease.

See – https://www.alz.org/nebraska/

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Improve Your Concentration with These 8 Pressure Points

http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=28533

We need good concentration and memory at every age and every stage of life. Regardless of whether we’re studying for an important exam or trying to remember how to get from one place to another, these abilities determine whether or not we’ll succeed in our mission. One of our strongest enemies in this struggle is stress, which negatively affects our concentration and memory.However, you can turn this calm into a regular part of your life while focusing and refining your concentration and memory skills with 8 pressure points that will improve your mental abilities using only your hands. From http://www.ba-bamail.com/

http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=28533

 

The Safest Cars for Seniors

This is a great article. Please read it all here. https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/the-safest-cars-for-seniors/
 – keith —–> . Posted On 05 Jan 2018 By : 

(…) I wasn’t able to back it up and look to see things behind me. My neck doesn’t turn as well as it used to, and my peripheral vision is not as good as it used to be, either.”

(…) There have never been so many senior drivers on the roads as there are today and their numbers are growing: in 2015, there were 50% more drivers over age 65 than there were in 1999, according to the Federal Highway Administration.

With these large numbers comes an increased need for vehicles that make driving easier while keeping seniors– and other people on America’s roads – safe. The good news is cars have never been safer than they are today. The bad news is with so many cars on the market, the process of finding the right one can be daunting.

https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/the-safest-cars-for-seniors/

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1-24 – Lincoln BIKE SHARE PROGRAM

OPEN HOUSE FOR BIKE SHARE PROGRAM IS JANUARY 24
The public is invited to an open house Wednesday, January 24, on phase one of BikeLNK, a community bike share service that begins this spring.  The event is from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the third-floor auditorium of the Bennett Martin Public Library, 136 South 14th Street.

The BikeLNK service will make 100 bikes available at 19 locations in downtown Lincoln and on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campuses.  The public can access the bikes by purchasing passes that can be used at bike station kiosks or through a mobile app or website.  The passes range from a single trip to a one-year membership.

The program is funded through private sponsorships and donations and a Federal Highway Administration Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program grant administered by the Nebraska Department of Transportation.

At the open house, the public will have the opportunity to view current maps and provide feedback.  No formal presentations are planned.  City staff and representatives of BCycle bike sharing company and Heartland Bike Share of Omaha will be available for questions and comments.

For more information, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: bike share) or contact Kellee Van Bruggen, Lincoln-Lancaster Planning Department, 402-441-6363, kvanbruggen@lincoln.ne.gov or Zach Becker, Public Works and Utilities Department, 402-613-3763, zbecker@lincoln.ne.gov.

10 Facts About Senior Living

That Will Surprise You

10 Facts About Senior Living That Will Surprise You

 

Fact #1: “80 is the new 65.”

Fact #2: The need for diverse eldercare is skyrocketing.

Fact #3: The typical assisted living resident is an independent female.

Fact #4: Specialized eldercare is on the rise.

Fact #5: Skilled nursing facilities are the most expensive care option – and may not be sustainable.

Fact #6: Seniors and their families are not prepared for the costs of long-term care.

Fact #7: Community and home-based care are on the rise.

Fact #8: Owning your own home may not make the most financial sense.

Fact #9: Many seniors avoid advanced care planning.

Fact #10: Staying active is the best prevention, even if you’ve been inactive all your life.

 Too Much Screen Time Hinders Health of Kids AND Seniors  

You’ve probably heard about the importance of limiting the amount of time kids spend watching TV, being on the computer or playing video games to ensure they get enough physical activity and limit the barrage of junk food marketing on TV that influences them. In general, too much sedentary behavior affects everyone’s health, but for older adults, it can not only negatively impact their physical health and hinder mobility, but their social/emotional health as well.   Aging Partners interviewed PHL President, Dr. Bob Rauner about the effects of too much screen time on senior health for  the Winter 2018 edition of Living Well magazine.  Read or download Living Well here.

All About Bitcoin: The Unofficial Guide

Recently, we’ve been hearing the term ‘Bitcoin’ a lot, coupled with concepts such as digital currency, emerging value, distributed currency, cryptography, and so on. Most of us listen to all these reports and find ourselves asking one simple question: “What is this Bitcoin?”Of course, even more questions arise and emerge immediately afterward: “Where did it come from?” “How did I not hear about it until now?” “What can you do with it?” All these questions are understandable and the following article will try to give you a concise, clear and simple explanation.

http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=28113

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