Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

Wild poliovirus is still a threat in parts of the world

wild poliovirus is still a threat in parts of the world, with 10 cases in Afghanistan and three cases in Pakistan this year so far.

On 15 August, 2018, Rotary announced nearly $100 million in grants to support the global effort to end polio, a vaccine-preventable disease that once paralyzed hundreds of thousands of children each year.

The announcement comes as Nigeria marks two years without any reported cases of wild poliovirus, following four reported cases in 2016.

Full story – https://www.endpolio.org/rotary-announces-us-965-million-to-end-polio-0

 

funding will support efforts to keep 12 vulnerable African countries polio-free:

・Cameroon ($98,600)
・Central African Republic ($394,400)
・Chad ($1.71 million)
・Democratic Republic of the Congo ($10.4 million)
・Guinea ($527,300)
・Madagascar ($690,000)
・Mali ($923,200)
・Niger ($85,300)
・Sierra Leone ($245,300)
・Somalia ($776,200)
・South Sudan ($3.5 million)
・Sudan ($2.6 million)

5 Tips For Getting Rid of a Dry Cough

 A persistent dry cough can be irritating to handle. The good news is that there are a number of remedies you can try to reduce or eliminate your cough. On that note, it is important to bear in mind that if your cough persists for more than three weeks, you should consult with your doctor. Meanwhile, here are some methods I have found to work on me:

Hip Replacement Surgery Dos and Don’ts: 

Posted On 07 May 2018 By : 

Summary only – Hip replacement surgery is one of the most common orthopedic procedures with over 300,000 surgeries done each year. The best piece of advice we can give you before your surgery is to be prepared. If you know what to do and what to not do, you can speed up your healing time and will soon be lacing up your running shoes once again.

Hip Replacement Surgery Dos and Don'ts: What You Need to Know Before Your Surgery

Hip Replacement Surgery Dos and Don’ts

Learn more about what you need to do to have a successful recovery from your hip replacement surgery:

DON’T: Do It Alone

DO: Eat for Healing

DO: Know What is Normal and Have Realistic Expectations

DO: Manage Your Pain

DO: Plan to Move

Read full story… https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/hip-replacement-surgery-dos-and-donts/

Medicare can help with cataracts 

Greg Dill
Greg Dill

Cataracts often come with age and can affect your vision. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. New eyeglasses, brighter lighting, antiglare sunglasses, or magnifying lenses may help your symptoms. If not, you may need surgery.

What else??? http://www.seniorspectrumnewspaper.com/newspaper/08_18/Greg_Dill.htm

Mosquito Bites

An estimated 20 percent of people, it turns out, are especially delicious for mosquitoes, and get bit more often on a consistent basis. And while scientists don’t yet have a cure for the ailment, other than preventing bites with insect repellent (which, we’ve recently discovered, some mosquitoes can become immune to over time), they do have a number of ideas regarding why some of us are more prone to bites than others. Here are some of the factors that could play a role:

Find out more here —> https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-do-mosquitoes-bite-some-people-more-than-others-10255934/

Anti-Aging Pills?

Can Aging Be Cured in Your Lifetime? It May Be So…

If there’s one thing we wish we could all have, it’s a way to stop aging and remain looking young forever. But, what if we could actually stop aging forever? Will it be possible to cure aging during your lifetime? Find out what this video has to say.

http://www.ba-bamail.com/video.aspx?emailid=30219

Cellular senescence From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cellular senescence is one phenomenon by which normal cells cease to divide. In their seminal experiments from the early 1960’s, Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead discovered that normal human fetal fibroblasts in culture reach a maximum of approximately 50 cell population doublings before becoming senescent.[1][2][3] This phenomenon is known as “replicative senescence”, or the Hayflick limit. Hayflick’s discovery that normal cells are mortal overturned a 60-year-old dogma in cell biology that maintained that all cultured cells are immortal. Hayflick found that the only immortal cultured cells are cancer cells.[4]

Health Tips for the Summer Season

By Dr. Tony Sun, Chief Medical Officer, UnitedHealthcare of Nebraska

Summer is here, providing an ideal time for people in Nebraska to get active. While some people may talk about getting a “beach body,” fitness is more than just a matter of aesthetics – it can mean the difference between a long life and premature death.

Studies show 80 percent or more of premature chronic conditions, such as heart attack, stroke or diabetes, are caused by modifiable lifestyle choices, as opposed to being caused by genetic factors. Yet, many Americans lack an understanding of the connection between lifestyle choices and chronic health conditions. A recent UnitedHealthcare survey found that just 16 percent of Americans correctly recognized that 80 percent or more of premature chronic conditions are caused by modifiable lifestyle choices, such as risk factors like smoking or obesity, not genetics.

To help make fitness a priority this summer, here are tips to consider:

Walk This Way: Studies have shown walking more and sitting less may help people maintain a healthier weight, ward off depression and prevent serious health issues like heart disease. And a recent report concluded that walking can help curb sweet cravings, boost the immune system and ease joint pain. To make walking more effective, think FIT, which stands for frequency (500 steps within seven minutes six times per day), intensity (3,000 steps within 30 minutes each day) and tenacity (at least 10,000 total steps per day).

Get Outside (Safely): The popularity of smartphones and streaming TV has made it easy – and entertaining – to stay inside. In fact, recent research has found that some people spend 90 percent of their time indoors, limiting exposure to daylight and fresh air. This can have negative consequences, including for children and their eye health. Studies have found that exposure to outdoor light may help reduce the risk of nearsightedness, the inability to see far off objects clearly. To gain the potential benefits of being outdoors while helping stay safe, children and adults should wear sunglasses that block both UV rays and blue light, as well as apply sunscreen to help reduce the risk of skin cancer.

 Maintain Your Hearing Health: Summer is a popular time for sporting events and music concerts, which can lead to exposure to loud sounds. Crowd noise at sporting events can exceed 90 decibels, while music concerts can reach 110 decibels. Prolonged exposure to sounds above 85 decibels can contribute to gradual hearing loss, so it is a good idea to use ear protection when seeing your favorite team or band. Likewise, extended listening to music or digital content through headphones or earbuds may damage hearing overtime. To help prevent that, turn the volume on your electronic device to 60 percent and listen for no longer than 60 minutes at a time, and never listen to earbuds while using power tools or a lawn mower.

 Stay Safe Overseas: With people heading out on summer vacations, it is important to recognize that up to 20 percent of travelers suffer an illness or injury while on vacation. Before traveling out of your home state, review your health plan and understand what it covers, including if you have access to a national or local network of hospitals and health care providers. For people traveling overseas, contact your primary care doctor or travel medicine clinic to determine what pre-screenings or immunizations might be recommended or required, based on your health history and countries on the itinerary.

Following these tips may help you focus on fun, friends and family during the summer, while helping maintain or improve your health now and in the future.

 

 

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