Archive for the ‘Growing Up 1950s and 60s’ Category

Social Security Depletion Year Remains 2034

This is hard to follow but is official… -Keith ——-

Tuesday, June 5, 2018
For Immediate Release
Social Security Administration Seal

 

Mark Hinkle, Acting Press Officer
press.office@ssa.gov

 

News Release
SOCIAL SECURITY

 

Social Security Combined Trust Fund Reserves Depletion Year Remains 2034 Says Board of Trustees

Disability Fund Improves by Four Years

The Social Security Board of Trustees today released its annual report on the long-term financial status of the Social Security Trust Funds. The combined asset reserves of the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance (OASDI) Trust Funds are projected to become depleted in 2034, the same as projected last year, with 79 percent of benefits payable at that time.

The OASI Trust Fund is projected to become depleted in late 2034, as compared to last year’s estimate of early 2035, with 77 percent of benefits payable at that time. The DI Trust Fund will become depleted in 2032, extended from last year’s estimate of 2028, with 96 percent of benefits still payable.

In the 2018 Annual Report to Congress, the Trustees announced:

  • The asset reserves of the combined OASDI Trust Funds increased by $44 billion in 2017 to a total of $2.89 trillion.
  • The total annual cost of the program is projected to exceed total annual income in 2018 for the first time since 1982, and remain higher throughout the 75-year projection period. As a result, asset reserves are expected to decline during 2018. Social Security’s cost has exceeded its non-interest income since 2010.
  • The year when the combined trust fund reserves are projected to become depleted, if Congress does not act before then, is 2034 – the same as projected last year. At that time, there will be sufficient income coming in to pay 79 percent of scheduled benefits.

“The Trustees’ projected depletion date of the combined Social Security Trust Funds has not changed, and slightly more than three-fourths of benefits would still be payable after depletion,” said Nancy A. Berryhill, Acting Commissioner of Social Security. “But the fact remains that Congress can keep Social Security strong by taking action to ensure the future of the program.”

Other highlights of the Trustees Report include:

  • Total income, including interest, to the combined OASDI Trust Funds amounted to $997 billion in 2017. ($874 billion from net payroll tax contributions, $38 billion from taxation of benefits, and $85 billion in interest)
  • Total expenditures from the combined OASDI Trust Funds amounted to more than $952 billion in 2017.
  • Social Security paid benefits of more than $941 billion in calendar year 2017. There were about 62 million beneficiaries at the end of the calendar year.
  • The projected actuarial deficit over the 75-year long-range period is 2.84 percent of taxable payroll – slightly larger than the 2.83 percent projected in last year’s report.
  • During 2017, an estimated 174 million people had earnings covered by Social Security and paid payroll taxes.
  • The cost of $6.5 billion to administer the Social Security program in 2017 was a very low 0.7 percent of total expenditures.
  • The combined Trust Fund asset reserves earned interest at an effective annual rate of 3.0 percent in 2017.

The Board of Trustees usually comprises six members. Four serve by virtue of their positions with the federal government: Steven T. Mnuchin, Secretary of the Treasury and Managing Trustee; Nancy A. Berryhill, Acting Commissioner of Social Security; Alex M. Azar II, Secretary of Health and Human Services; and R. Alexander Acosta, Secretary of Labor. The two public trustee positions are currently vacant.

View the 2018 Trustees Report at www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/TR/2018/.

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How to Distinguish Between Alzheimer’s and Aging

Our memory capacity changes as we get older, but memory loss that adversely affects everyday life is not an ordinary sign of aging and may actually be a symptom of the onset of dementia. This phenomenon causes a slow deterioration of memory, reasoning, and logic, with the most common type known as “Alzheimer’s” – a serious disease that disrupts the functioning of brain cells and even stops their activity.
  • Changes in memory caused by old age will be related to the names of people or places, but changes caused by Alzheimer’s are expressed through forgetfulness that severely affects one’s ability to work and even engage in a social life and hobbies.

Buying the Boat.

Buying the Boat. original 2-13-11 – Updated 4-28-18

“The question of whether one generation has the right to bind another by a deficit it imposes is a question of such consequence as to place it among the fundamental principles of our government. We should consider ourselves unauthorized to saddle posterity with our debts and morally bound to pay for them ourselves.”  Thomas Jefferson.

But how? Read on

I am reading a story today about privatizing Medicare – but only for people under the age of 55. I don’t know what “Privatizing” really means to the future readers of this paper but it raises a question that has bothered me for years. How do we pay off our national debt? I don’t mean “How do we cut the deficit.” I am talking about the overspending of the past.

Lets say that I bought a boat that I did not need, on credit, and then I crashed it into the rocks and watched it sink.  Should I stop making payments to the person who sold me the boat? Should I ask my neighbors to help me pay? Maybe I should ask the boat dealer to send the bill to my children? I don’t think so… I bought it and it is my responsibility. And please – just shoot me – if I go out and buy another boat before I pay for the first one – just because I think it is fun – or something I NEED.

The National Debt is OUR boat. We bought it and we watched it sink. I am not sure why so many people feel our National debt is the debt of the Federal Government and their problem to solve. The National debt is MY debt and YOUR debt. This upsets us, and makes us feel frustrated and even angry. But our anger does NOT change the facts of who bought the boats. We did and we have not paid the bill.

Did we deserve the Bush tax cuts before our National debts were paid? Who told us it was OUR money and we should get it back? Politicians who wanted votes.

Should we ask our lender, China, to forget the money we borrowed or devalue their Yuan currency?

Perhaps our good neighbor, Canada, might chip in to pay our bills?

Some think that maybe we can increase taxes in the future? But that is going to anger our voting age children. By the time taxes are raised we of the older generations will be paying taxes at a greatly reduced rate. We might be off to that tax-free haven in the beyond. Essentially, we just don’t want to pay our bills.

We know that our elected officials have to get a handle on current and future deficits and that means change for all kinds of welfare – which includes our Social Security checks and Medicare payments. Don’t be fooled. These payments become personal welfare the moment that we get more out of the programs than we paid in. Please don’t forget this fact.

The National debt from World War II is tiny compared to the debt doubling during the Reagan years. That is when I first learned to divide our National debt by the number of tax payers in this United States. The numbers seem impossible. Oh, for the days when the debt was “only” $4,000,000,000,000. Yikes! Four trillion seemed bad enough. What is it now $19,000,000,000,000? That is $63,000 per person. Unbelievable!

How do we fix this problem? All the answers that I have seen continue to push the problem onward to the next generations. Our misguided perspective is driven by policy makers who continue to cultivate votes rather than solve problems.

For right or wrong – our country has spent too much money. And we have spent it in many unnecessary ways. Take your pick – optimistic wars, too much welfare, overpaid public officials, and wasteful contracts. All contribute to the problem. All are controlled by the people we elect. And the people we elect tend to have big egos and a huge desire for power. And money to spend is raw power.

It is never fair to lump all politicians into this category. Many public servants want only to do good. The sad truth is that “doing good” is in the eye of the person with the most power. And power, as noted, requires our money.

I am not sophisticated enough to understand much about government but I do know that OUR generation has not paid OUR bills. And I know that none of us want to pay our bills either.

One solution is to grow the economy (so the future can pay the bills). Another solution is to stop spending so much (which also pushes the payments off to the future generations.) I am looking for each of us to say that we need to come clean and pay the National Debt – not by raising taxes but by paying our bill.

Raising taxes will push payments onto the next generation. Most retirees don’t pay taxes anymore or greatly reduced from our working years.

I should just ask our readers to offer solutions for paying off the money that WE spent. Right or wrong, we elected the folks who took us into debt. They are the agents that we hired to buy our boats. And WE are the ones who should pay the bill. How do we do that…?

We Seniors are the worst for ignoring the problem – voting only for people who dabble at the ongoing deficit while ignoring the existing debt. They are two separate issues.

The only solution that I see for the existing debt has its foundation in estate taxes. We all want our family fortunes to be passed on to the kids but is it fair to give it away our wealth before we pay for our debts?

If we are responsible and we believe that a new law would be fair to everyone, would we be willing to pay? Maybe – but I doubt it. This world is filled with people who blame government – which solves nothing.

Since we can’t force ourselves to pay up, maybe it better for us to wait until we are gone from this good earth to pay our fair share.

Here is one thought. If the government can determine how much we have paid through “retirement” taxes and how much we have collected through Social Security and Medicare, wouldn’t it be fair to balance the sheet after we are gone?

Perhaps there is nothing left for the kids – well – isn’t that the fact of the matter? We and our elected representatives set up the spending formula and it seems that, after we are gone, those who have benefited should pay their own bills.  Otherwise, all our health care and all our “extra” retirement checks are like winning a lottery.

Should any of us expect our retirement checks to go to the kids after we are gone? Neither should we send the bills to them.

The writer welcomes your comments posted at WordPress. Please offer alternative solutions along with any complaints.

Brain Cells Keep on Growing, Even in the Elderly…

While many people assume that brain cells are gone forever once dead, new research has now revealed that humans actually continue to produce them long throughout adulthood, and their findings may have a significant impact on the way diseases like Alzheimer’s are treated.

Apr 3-7 Resistance of Soviet-ordered Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968

A celebration of resistance: Prague Spring 50 events

Photo from the Josef Josten Papers, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Archives and Special Collections
Photo from the Josef Josten Papers, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Archives and Special Collections

The UNL Department of History will host Prague Spring 50, a major international event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Prague Spring and the aftereffects of the Soviet-ordered Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. Events will take place April 3-7 at the Sheldon Museum of Art. Free and open to the public. Registration requested.

Led by Alexander Dubček, Prague Spring was a well-intentioned, but ill-fated attempt to liberalize the authoritarian political system, and it would take another 20 years before the dissident playwright Václav Havel would lead one of the greatest political revolutions of our lifetime – the Velvet Revolution.

Speakers will reflect on Prague Spring and 1968, twenty years of “normalization” behind the Iron Curtain and the significance and meaning of the Velvet Revolution.

Date and Time:  Tue, Apr 3, 4:30 p.m. -Sat, Apr 7, 6 p.m.
Location: Sheldon Museum of Art .  12th & R Streets
Registration is requested.
To register, go to:  https://praguespring50.unl.edu/

Schedule: https://praguespring50.unl.edu/schedule

More details at: https://go.unl.edu/7gm6

http://newsroom.unl.edu/announce/olliatunl/7815/44571

 

Polio Eradication 2018

As of 13 February, there had been three reported WPV1 cases with an onset of paralysis in 2018, in Afghanistan.[62][119] Positive environmental-monitoring samples show the virus continues to circulate in Pakistan.[115] In Banadir province, Somalia, environmental samples positive for cVDPV2, related to those on the previous year, were again detected, confirming circulation of the virus.[115]

public health effort to eliminate all cases of poliomyelitis (polio) infection around the world, begun in 1988 and led by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Rotary Foundation,[1] has reduced the number of annual diagnosed wild polio cases from the hundreds of thousands to 22 in 2017.

For a polio virus to be certified as eradicated world-wide, at least three years of good surveillance without cases needs to be achieved,[56] though this period may need to be longer for a strain like WPV3, where a lower proportion of those infected demonstrate symptoms.[57]

Oral polio vaccine is highly effective and inexpensive (about US$0.10 per dose, or US$0.30 per child[12]) and its availability has bolstered efforts to eradicate polio.

See Wikipedia for more.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poliomyelitis_eradication#2018

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Reported Polio Cases in 2012[103]

Polio worldwide 2012.svg

5 Top Ways to Find Love After 65

Posted On 02 Feb 2017 By : 
 It’s no secret that intimacy and relationships are the most important part of life. They are crucial throughout our lives, but especially in our latter life for happiness, health and overall well-being. Unfortunately, finding a partner later in life can be challenging.Top Ways to Find Love After 65

Many of the difficulties that we face when approaching love are based on expectations that love ought to be the same as it was during middle-age. Instead, it is important for older people to define new and authentic modes of intimacy and sexuality, so knowing where to find potential partners is important, and is, interestingly, more accessible than ever before for today’s aging population.

Click here – https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/2-08-16-top-ways-to-find-love-after-65/

The online Feature includes.

1. Internet
2. Community Centers
3. Dating Coaches, Services or Matchmakers
4. Local Neighborhood Stores and Activities
5. Senior Living Communities
Ways to Get Past Dating Obstacles
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