Archive for the ‘Dining’ Category

dec 20 – AGING PARTNERS HOSTS WINTER HOLIDAY MEALS

 

Aging Partners invites older adults and the public to winter holiday meals Wednesday, December 20.

Reservations are required by calling the senior center by noon Tuesday, December 19.

Locations, meal times and reservation phone numbers are as follows:

  • Asian Senior Center, 144 N. 44th St., call 402-477-3446 for reservations
  • Downtown Senior Center, 1005 “O” St., call 402-441-7154 for reservations
  • Lake Street Senior Center, 2400 S. 11th St., call 402-441-7157 for reservations
  • Maxey Senior Center, 2032 “U” St., 402-441-7849 for reservations
  • Northeast Senior Center, 6310 Platte Ave., call 402-441-7151 for reservations
  • Hickman Senior Center, 300 E. 3rd St., in Hickman, call 402-416-7693 for reservations

Meals will be served at 11:30 a.m., with the exception of the Asian Senior Center, which will serve at 10:30 a.m.

The suggested meal contribution is $6 for age 60 and over, and there is a $9 fee for those under age 60.  There is a suggested contribution of $4 for transportation within senior center transportation boundaries.

The menu includes baked ham, twice baked mashed potato, broccoli with cheese, roll, cheesecake with strawberries or diet pudding and 1 percent or skim milk.  Many of the senior centers will also feature entertainment.

For more information and for senior center locations, call 402-441-7158.  More information on Aging Partners can be found at www.aging.lincoln.ne.gov 

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Top 10 Buffets in Las Vegas, Guide to Vegas | Vegas.com

A complete guide to Top 10 Buffets in Las Vegas and other travel tips and suggestions for your Vegas vacation in Vegas.com’s Las Vegas Guide. Get these travel tips and Vegas hotel reservations, show tickets, tour reservations and more on Vegas.com

Source: Top 10 Buffets in Las Vegas, Guide to Vegas | Vegas.com

12 Springtime Activities for Seniors

There’s just something so rejuvenating about spring. Whether it’s the birds chirping, flowers or sunshine; spring does wonders for the senior soul.

Springtime is a favorite season for seniors because many of them are retired and have spent the winter being cooped-up indoors.

See all 12 – –> Source: 12 Springtime Activities for Seniors

Samples
6. Eat outdoors at a fancy restaurant.
7. Visit a nursery.
8. Go on a picnic.

 

The Mill Coffee and Bistro to open at Nebraska Innovation Campus

Daniel and Tamara Sloan, owners of The Mill Coffee and Tea, announced their plans to open a third Lincoln location at Nebraska Innovation Campus this summer.

The new shop, to be called The Mill Coffee and Bistro, will feature The Mill’s signature coffees and teas as well as an expanded food menu of breakfast items, lunch items, small plates, snacks, wine and beer.

The Mill Coffee and Tea is a small-batch craft coffee roaster, espresso bar and tea house that was started in Lincoln in 1975. The original store is now located at 800 P St. in the Historic Haymarket.

Daniel Sloan said it has been 17 years since The Mill opened its second location, on Prescott Avenue near South 48th Street – and that he believes the new spot at NIC is the next compelling opportunity for The Mill.

“The new Mill Coffee and Bistro at Nebraska Innovation Campus will allow us to provide the warm, welcoming, collaborative community we love to create in an environment that strives to enhance and support education, research and innovation,” he said.

The Bistro’s menu will include a full line of pastries, quiche, breakfast burritos, yogurt parfaits and fresh fruits. Additional menu items will include salads, soups and hot and cold sandwiches, a variety of small plates and snacks. The Bistro will also offer cask wine, a selection of bottled wine, and local and regional craft beers.

“We are so fortunate to have The Mill Coffee and Bistro locate at NIC,” said Dan Duncan, NIC executive director. “The Bistro will play a significant role in creating the culture and social activities key to developing an environment of innovation on campus.”

Construction on the new NIC restaurant space will start this month. The Bistro will be on the first floor of the campus’ north Innovation Commons building. The space will feature dining, meeting and gathering space. Guests will find soft seating for small group gathering, a communal table, audio-visual equipment for small meetings and free WiFi.

NIC is a research campus designed to facilitate new and in-depth partnerships between the university and private-sector businesses. At full build-out, NIC will be a 2.2-million square-foot campus with uniquely designed buildings and amenities that inspire creative activity and engagement, transforming ideas into global innovation.

NEBRASKA TODAY: http://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/unltoday

NEWS RELEASES: http://news.unl.edu/news-releases/1/

EXPERTS SITE: http://news.unl.edu/experts

WRITER: Kate Engel, Nebraska Innovation Campus
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Office of University Communication
1217 Q St. Lincoln, NE 68588-0218

 

You Need to Know This Before Buying Bottled Water

When buying bottled water, consumers are advised to check the bottom of the bottle, in order to protect their health. Plastic bottles labeled with letters like HDP, HDPE, PP and a few others, do not release any toxic material in the water, and the remaining letters can represent the chemicals…

Source: You Need to Know This Before Buying Bottled Water

So important that I will include the text here.

A Complete Guide to Plastic Bottle Safety

 We have been using plastic bottles all our lives. But let’s face it – we all tend to be a bit skeptical about the actual consequences they have on our health. We are right in knowing they contain harmful chemicals, but the degree of this harm varies according to the type of plastic used. You may never have been informed of the ways plastic bottles harm us and which types of plastic cause the most harm – but the answers all lie at the bottom of your bottle.
If you flip your plastic bottle over you are likely to see letters marked on or close to its base. Some common ones include PET, PVC, HDP and PP. If these don’t sound familiar to you, you’re not alone – we are going to help you decipher their meaning. This will hopefully help you make wiser choices when buying water bottles.
Here’s what each label means:
water-bottles

1. PET or PETE: 

This one probably sounds familiar. It is the most commonly used plastic material in packaging and consumer products, used especially for water and soft drink bottles. This kind of plastic is only intended for single use and is difficult to decontaminate, meaning that repeated use can be harmful. The more you use it, the higher the risk of leach and bacteria. Also, the metals and chemicals released by this material may tamper with our body’s hormonal balance.

water-bottles

2. HDP or HDPE:

HDPE is a harder type of plastic often used for milk jugs, detergent bottles, oil bottles, toys and some plastic bags. Experts claim that this is the safest kind of plastic that you can choose when buying bottled water, because it barely releases any chemicals. This means your water will be cleaner, hence causing minimal harmful effects on your health

water-bottles

3. PVC or 3V:

This symbol indicates the use of PVC, a highly toxicplastic that is soft and flexible, and is generally used for food wrapping, oil bottles, teething rings, toys, and blister packaging. The chemicals it releases are said to have serious consequences on our body, since they pose effects on our hormones. Experts suggest to avoid packaging made from the PVC and try to find an alternative to it.

water-bottles

4. LDPE:

Although this type of plastic does not release chemicals into the water, you are unlikely to see this label on your water bottle, because the LDPE material is not used in its production. Rather, you would find it in food packaging, in the case of which you should still try to avoid it. LDPE may still release highly dangerous chemicals in the foods you eat.

water-bottles

5. PP:

Yogurt cups and syrup packing are made of this white-colored or semi-transparent type of plastic, referred to as PP (polypropylene plastic). This kind of material is tough, lightweight and heat-resistant. This material won’t melt easily if heated. Overall, it is a rather safe type of plastic, and  it can also block out moisture, grease and chemicals.

water-bottles

6. PS:

PS stands for Polystyrene – a type of inexpensive and lightweight plastic that is used for a range of products. We have often used this type of plastic for disposable styrofoam drinking cups, egg cartons, plastic picnic cutlery, and take-out “clamshell“ food containers. PS should be restricted to short-term usage only, since dangerous carcinogenic substances could be released from it when heated.

7. PC or non-labeled plastic:

This is potentially the most dangerous plastic found out there. If you ever find the “PC” label on plastic bottles (or no label at all), make sure you steer clear of it as much as possible. It refers to a catch-all category for polycarbonate materials and “other” plastics, which contain chemicals that are likely to leach into the food or drink products it makes contact with. Examples of the use of this material include sports water bottles and food containers. It is highly discouraged to reuse or recycle this type of plastic.

 

Note: These kinds of plastics are not only used for food and drink products. We also find them in everyday items in which they may not directly affect our health, such as water pipes, signs, clothing, furniture, shower curtains, textiles, stationery, insulation, diapers, medical equipment, etc. Nonetheless, we should always be knowledgeable about the materials and chemicals included in the products we buy, taking extra care on the ones that contain food and drinks.

 

H/T: healthy-holistic-living.com

 

Diabetic Food List: The Worst Choices for Diabetes | Reader’s Digest

9 of the Worst Eating Habits for Diabetes If you’re trying to lower blood sugar and stay healthy, make sure you aren’t committing these eating mistakes.

Source: Diabetic Food List: The Worst Choices for Diabetes | Reader’s Digest

The Best and Worst Drinks for Diabetics | Reader’s Digest

Liquid calories and nutrition can be good or bad for blood sugar and diabetes. Here’s how you can get the healthiest bang from your beverages.

Source: The Best and Worst Drinks for Diabetics | Reader’s Digest

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