Archive for the ‘Entertainment’ Category

TIPS TO NAVIGATE THE HOLIDAY SEASON

Lincoln, Nebraska, Dec. 19, 2019 — With the holidays approaching, University of Nebraska–Lincoln researchers are delivering top tips for navigating the season with good cheer. This listicle provides research-based recommendations on designing energy-efficient light displays; accommodating food allergies; adding healthy choices to the holiday buffet; recycling holiday decor; and decreasing stress to maximize the enjoyment of the season.

Counting calories in real time may curb overindulgence

During the holiday season, an average adult gains about a pound — which is often never lost. This trend may contribute to the U.S.’s increasing rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other long-term illnesses. 

Nebraska agricultural economist Christopher Gustafson is working to help people make healthier decisions about food consumption. In a 2019 study, Gustafson explored whether access to a real-time calorie counter would spur healthier choices. 

Compared to people without a calorie tracker, the participants who used the device had a more accurate view of the number of calories they selected over five sequential food choices. They also chose significantly fewer calories overall. The differences occurred in the last few selections, suggesting that people without a tracker overindulged down the line because they underestimated the caloric value of earlier choices.

This means people may make poorer choices at a later point in time — at dessert or during a second trip through the buffet line, for example — because they’ve undershot their caloric intake to that point.

Until free, real-time calorie trackers are available — a long-range goal of Gustafson’s research — people can help themselves by staying attuned to their actual consumption.

“At a time of year full of holiday celebrations — usually with tempting foods — people may be able to make their New Year’s resolutions easier to accomplish by trying to be honest with themselves about the foods they’re consuming now,” Gustafson said.

Boosting your home’s cheer, but not your energy bill

Holiday lights are beautiful, but they also sap power. Estimates from the Department of Energy indicate Americans’ holiday light use burns 6.6 billion kilowatt-hours annually — enough to fuel more than 800,000 homes for a year.

Luckily there are ways to mitigate power use without turning into the Grinch, said Jerry Hudgins, interim director of the Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research and professor and chair of electrical and computer engineering.

Using LED lights rather than traditional incandescent bulbs yields significant savings, he said. They’re more expensive up front, with an LED bulb costing about $1.50 compared to 25 cents for a same-sized regular bulb. But over time, the investment pays off: LEDs use up to 70% less energy than traditional lights, and they last roughly 10 times longer.

“Because of the lower electrical power requirements, LEDs cause fewer greenhouse gases to be emitted from electric power generation, and so are more environmentally friendly,” Hudgins said.

Another power-saving tip is to put your outdoor lights on a timer, so that they’re running during high-traffic times, when the greatest number of people will enjoy them. Hudgins pointed out that after midnight, few people are out and about to admire your display.

Beyond energy-saving tips, Hudgins recommends people stay safe with outdoor holiday displays by using extension cords that are rated for outdoor use and have the proper gauge wire size. A lower number, or gauge, corresponds to a larger diameter wire and can handle a higher electrical load.

“A long extension cord with small gauge wire can overheat if the electrical load is too high,” Hudgins said.

Helping yourself — and your dog — stay calm

Depleted bank accounts, time with the family and an onslaught of parties and events is enough to bring on the holiday frazzle for many people.

One solution? Jeffrey Stevens, associate professor of psychology and director of Nebraska’s Canine Cognition and Human Interaction Lab, said turning to your four-legged companion for support is a scientifically backed way to ratchet down the pressure.

“Our research has shown that briefly petting a dog can improve mood and reduce stress and anxiety,” Stevens said. “So if things get a little overwhelming, spend some quality time with your pet to calm yourself and strengthen your bond.”

Remember, though, the holidays aren’t just stressful for people — dogs can get keyed up too, with extra UPS deliveries, guests in the house and packages on the floor to explore. Stevens said to watch out for dogs’ signs of stress — panting, yawning and lip licking in situations where those behaviors don’t typically occur.

“If it seems like your pet is stressed, make sure they have a quiet place to relax away from the hustle and bustle.”

Stevens launched the Canine Cognition and Human Interaction Lab in 2018, aiming to develop a better understanding of dog psychology and how interacting with dogs influences human behavior and psychology.

Enhancing children’s nutrition during the holidays

‘Tis the season for cookies, candy and sweets — but it’s also possible for families to celebrate the holidays healthfully by incorporating fruits and vegetables.

“You can make healthy foods festive by getting creative with fruits and vegetables to make fun snacks that are bright and delightful,” said Carly Hillburn, a Nebraska dietetics intern and collaborator on the Ecological Approach to Family Style dining program.

Examples include making “Grinch Santas” by stacking green grapes, banana slices and strawberries, or placing sliced strawberries and bananas into a candy cane shape.

The EAT Family Style team also recommends:

> Getting children involved at mealtimes to pique their interest in trying their creations. For example, toddlers can dump ingredients into bowls and stir; preschoolers can use cookie cutters and rinse produce; and elementary-aged children can crack eggs and use vegetable peelers.

> Exploring healthy meals by engaging children’s senses and talking about nutritional benefits. Since children are curious about the world, ask them to explore their food using the five senses. You can ask specific questions about foods, such as “Did you hear the celery crunch when you took a bite?” or incorporate nutritional phrases into mealtimes, such as “Fruits will give my body energy.”

EAT Family Style is led by Dipti Dev, the Betti and Richard Robinson Associate Professor of Child, Youth and Family Studies. Saima Hasnin, doctoral student in child, youth and family studies, and Rachel Maloy, an undergraduate in nutrition and dietetics, contributed to this article.

Building happier, healthier families through storytelling

The holiday season is replete with family time and intergenerational gatherings.

Nebraska’s Jody Koenig Kellas, professor of communication studies and an expert on interpersonal, family and health communication, said the family stories we hear and tell can have a significant and lasting impact on family members. For this reason, the holidays can be the perfect time to intentionally engage in storytelling to learn about or revisit family history and create stronger ties.

Koenig Kellas said family stories help create a sense of family identity; socialize members about family meanings, values and beliefs; cope with and make sense of difficulty and stress; and connect with one another. 

But her research shows that how families share stories is crucial.

“Families who engage in storytelling by being present and warm, who share the floor and build on each other’s contributions, who seek out and honor each other’s perspectives on how things happened or the meaning of the story, and who work together to create the meaning or moral of the story – these families report higher levels of health and happiness than families who are distant, disengaged, don’t take each other’s perspectives into account and don’t work together to build story meaning,” Koenig Kellas said.

In short, being mindfully engaged, other-centered and collaborative during the storytelling process is one avenue for promoting family satisfaction and closeness.

Giving your Christmas tree a second life

During the holiday season, decor often includes a fresh-cut Christmas tree. But after the ornaments and lights are back in storage, most real trees end up in landfills, where they can take years to break down.

But there are other options for your evergreen, according to Nebraska Extension horticulture educators Nicole Stoner and Sarah Browning.

Here are their tips:

> Create a backyard habitat to feed the birds: After stripping the tree of decor, move it to the south or east side of your home, anchor it securely and decorate it with strings of popcorn, cranberries or raisins to create a bird oasis. 

> Boost local fish habitat: If you take your tree to a local lake designated for Christmas tree recycling, it will be placed on the lake’s ice in the winter. When the ice melts in spring, the trees fall into the water and function as fish habitat.

> Sustain local parks: Lincoln has several recycling points for Christmas trees, which are collected, chipped and used as mulch or pathway cover in city parks and arboreta.

> Beautify your garden: Chip your tree and use it as garden mulch in the spring. Alternatively, clean up the tree and use it to make a trellis, which can be used to grow cucumbers up off the ground.

Staying merry despite food allergies

Many people love to indulge in the traditional dishes and flavors of the holiday season. But for individuals and families with food allergies, these food-filled events can become dangerous.

“Food allergies are potentially life-threatening conditions affecting millions of Americans, and the only way to prevent reactions is strict avoidance,” said Melanie Downs, assistant professor of food science and technology and a member of Nebraska’s Food Allergy Research and Resource Program. “Even very small amounts of food can cause reactions.”

But Downs and Eleanor Garrow-Holding of the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Connection Team, a FARRP collaborator, said food allergies are manageable, even during the holidays. Here are their tips for event attendees:

> Contact your host and alert them of the allergy and precautions, including not having the allergen present, if necessary.

> Offer to go a little early and help clean.

> Offer to help the host cook the food.

> Have your child eat a snack before you go, so they’re less tempted to grab food when you’re not watching.

> Bring separate dishes that you know your child can eat.

> Remind your child about not eating anything that you haven’t OK’d first.

> Always be prepared with an allergy and anaphylaxis emergency care plan and epinephrine, if prescribed.

More information is available on the FARRP and FAACT websites, https://farrp.unl.edu and https://www.foodallergyawareness.org/education.

Combating holiday blues in children

The wintertime hustle and bustle is overwhelming to some children, particularly those who have experienced a significant change in their life.

Nebraska Extension’s Lisa Poppe, who specializes in the social and emotional well-being of children, said holiday plans that are typically happy and exciting can be complicated by divorce, separation, remarriage or the loss of a parent or other important figure.

“When children are in these situations, the holidays may remind them of how their life was before, and the emotional conflict and stress can ruin their time,” said Poppe, who is part of the Metro Extension District.

Poppe provided the following tips to help children navigate the stress:

> Maintain family traditions even if a parent is absent. Children look forward to the normalcy of these traditions and feel safe in this routine.

> It’s OK if you don’t see everyone or do everything. Overscheduled children become burned out, overtired and cranky.

> Make sure children get plenty of sleep.

> Build in extra time for traveling, and bring plenty of snacks, games and books with you.

> Don’t forget to take care of yourself. When you’re overcommitted or on edge, children feel that stress.

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WRITER: Tiffany Lee, Office of Research and Economic Development

CAPITAL CITY READY FOR UNL GAMEDAY TRAFFIC

Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird said Lincoln is ready to welcome Husker fans to the Capital City for another season of Nebraska football.  The first of the Huskers’ seven home games starts at 11 a.m. Saturday, August 31 against South Alabama.  

IMPORTANT REMINDERS

  • The University of Nebraska adheres to a clear bag policy at Memorial Stadium.  Visit huskers.com/bagpolicy for more information.  
  • Fans should lock their vehicles and move valuable items out of sight.
  • Drinking alcohol is prohibited on City streets, parking lots, garages and sidewalks, including the trail between Haymarket Park and 8th Street.  
  • The sale of tickets, souvenirs or other items is not allowed on City streets or sidewalks.  
  • Officers will issue citations for violations that inhibit the use of the street or sidewalk.  
  • The sale of food, flowers or balloons requires a sidewalk vendor permit.
  • UNL is a smoke/tobacco-free campus.

To avoid gameday traffic and parking challenges, City officials recommend visiting lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: closures) or using the Waze mobile app for maps and street construction information; planning for parking; arriving early; celebrating downtown after games; and using StarTran’s Big Red Express (startran.lincoln.ne.gov).

GETTING TO AND FROM THE GAME

To improve the traffic experience on game day, Lincoln Transportation and Utilities, the Lincoln Police Department, the UNL Police Department and Nebraska Department of Transportation (NDOT) work together.  The City provides traffic control on Lincoln streets, while NDOT helps coordinate traffic on I-180 and I-80.  Coordination efforts include traffic planning, pre- and post-game messaging, planned lane and ramp closures and sharing of incidents with all parties involved as they happen.

On football game days, Interstate 80 exits at I-180/Downtown and 27th Street can be congested, so visitors are encouraged to use other routes into Lincoln:

  • From the east, take the Hwy. 6/Cornhusker Hwy. exit 409.  Turn south at State Fair Park Drive and west on Salt Creek Roadway to reach Memorial Stadium, the Champion’s Club and parking facilities east of the stadium and in the Haymarket.
  • From the west, use exit I-80 at Homestead Expressway/Hwy. 77 South, then go east on Rosa Parks Way.
  • Those using I-80 who plan to park in the Haymarket Park lots will experience less congestion if they enter Lincoln using the Airport exit 399.

Those entering Lincoln on southbound I-180/9th Street, are strongly encouraged to use “N” Street and Arena Drive to access the Haymarket, the Haymarket parking garages and Pinnacle Bank Arena.  To improve traffic flow, the following changes will be in effect before and after the games:

  • Two hours before kickoff, southbound 9th Street will be closed starting at the roundabout at 9th Street and Salt Creek Roadway near Memorial Stadium.  The street will reopen once vehicles have left the stadium area after the game.
  • Two hours before kickoff, “R”, “Q” and “P” streets will be closed to traffic from 9th Street.  Drivers coming from I-180 will have to use “N” Street to access the Haymarket Area.   
  • Salt Creek Roadway will have lane restrictions at 14th Street to better manage traffic congestion.
  • 16th Street from Vine to “Q” streets will be closed to northbound traffic.
  • Postgame traffic on northbound 10th Street from “Q” to “T” streets will be restricted to I-180.  No traffic will be allowed to go past the stadium on 10th Street.  The street will reopen once pedestrians have left the stadium area after the game.
  • Following the game, N. 10th Street south of Charleston Street will be closed to southbound traffic. 
  • Following the game, N. 17th Street from Vine to “X” streets will be closed.
  • Following the game, for those that have parked in the Haymarket Garages, 7th Street from “N” to “M” streets will be one-way southbound and “M” Street from 7th to 9th streets will be a one-way eastbound.

Other gameday events include the Haymarket Farmers Market every Saturday through October 12 and Railyard entertainment and activities on Fridays and Saturdays.  The Cube in the Railyard will show football games all day on Saturdays.  The area of the Haymarket Farmers Market will close from 5:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Saturday through October 12.  North 7th and 8th streets as well as Canopy Street will close from “P” to “Q” streets. “P” Street will close from 7th to 8th Street and “Q” Street will close from 7th to Canopy streets.

Some City road construction projects may impact gameday traffic:

  • The southern two lanes of “Q” Street between N. 11th and N. 12th streets are closed.
  • Southbound N. 14th Street between Fletcher Avenue and Morton Street will be closed through September 13.

Other traffic reminders:

  • Stadium Drive west of the stadium will be closed to all vehicular traffic.  Passenger drop-off and pick-up will not be allowed in front of the Stadium before or after the game.
  • Uber, Lyft and taxi drop-off and pickup will be located at the bus stop in front of Henzlik Hall, 1430 Vine St.
  • Charter buses will park on “W” Street between 14th and 16th streets.
  • 17th Street from “R” to Vine streets (on the UNL City Campus) is closed.
  • Vine Street from N. Antelope Valley Pkwy to 16th Street (on the UNL City Campus) has been reduced to single eastbound and westbound lanes with a bike lane in each direction.

Those choosing to ride bicycles to the game have several options:

  • The “N” Street Cycle Track is a protected bikeway for the exclusive use of cyclists on the south side of “N” Street from 23rd Street to Arena Drive.  
  • Downtown bike lanes are on 14th Street from “L” to “R” streets and on 11th Street from “Q” to “D” streets.  
  • Bike lanes are now open on Vine and 16th streets on UNL City’s Campus. 
  • Bike UNL offers free bike valet service for all home games.  Cyclists can drop off their bikes on the east side of Cook Pavilion near 14th and “W” streets two hours prior to kickoff.  The service also accepts BikeLNK bicycles from the City bike share program.  All bikes must be picked up within one hour after the game.  For more information on the bike valet service, visit bike.unl.edu/bikevalet or call 402-472-4777.  For more information on BikeLNK, visit bikelnk.bcycle.com.

GAMEDAY PARKING

Parking meters are enforced Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.  The following fine system is in effect:

  • If the ticket is paid online within seven days from when it is written, the fine is $9.
  • If the ticket is paid in person or through the mail within seven days, the fine is $10.
  • If the ticket is paid after seven days, the fine is $25 in person or by mail or $24 online.

To avoid parking tickets, fans can purchase a $10 tag for all-day, on-street parking in metered stalls from any City employee wearing a Parking Services shirt at City-operated parking facilities.

Fans can also reserve pre-paid parking in the Haymarket and other City garages through parkandgo.org.  Rates for the four West Haymarket garages are $25, and the other rates vary by garage.  Limited parking will be available for $25 in the VIP Parking Garage attached to the southwest side of Pinnacle Bank Arena.  Parking garages available in the West Haymarket are:

  • Red 1, 555 “R” Street
  • Green 2, 530 “P” Street
  • Blue 3, 535 “P” Street
  • Lumberworks, 700 “N” Street

Reserved, reduced-price, pre-paid football parking is also available through parkandgo.org for these locations:

  • County-City lots – North (10th and “K”), South (701 S. 10th) and West (802 “J”) – $20 on site and $15 online
  • Carriage Park (1120 “L”), Cornhusker Square (1220 “L”) and Center Park (1100 “N”) – $25 on site, $20 online
  • Haymarket (9th and “Q”), Lincoln Station South (7th and “P”), Market Place (10th and “Q”), Que Place (1111 “Q”), Red 1 (555 “R”), Green 2 (530 “P”), Blue 3 (535 “P”), University Square (101 N. 14th), Larson Building (1317 “Q”), West Depot lot (676 “O”), Lumberworks (700 “N”) – $30 on site, $25 online
  • Sun Valley and Charleston St. lot near Oak Lake Park – vehicle parking is $10 on site and online; RV parking is $50 on site and $45 online
  • “N” Street Gravel lot, “N” Street and Arena Drive – vehicle parking is $30 and RV parking is $75 on site  
  • 14th and New Hampshire lot – vehicle parking is $20 on site and $15 online, and RV parking is $100 on site and online.
  • 1318 “M” Street Garage – $25 on site and $20 online
  • 233 S. 14th Street lot – $30 on site and $20 online

Grills are not allowed in City garages.  Grills are allowed at the 14th and New Hampshire lot and at the Sun Valley and Charleston lot.  Fans planning to stay Friday night on City property must purchase their parking online and display the permit in their RV overnight.  RV parking is not allowed at the Haymarket Park baseball/softball complex.  

UNL parking lots will be available for use six hours prior to kick off.  Grills are not allowed in University garages. Gameday parking information and maps are available at parking.unl.edu/ (keyword: football).

Alcohol Consumption

Nebraska State Statute (Chapter 53-186) prohibits the consumption of alcohol on state property. It is unlawful for any person to consume alcoholic liquor upon property owned or controlled by the state or any governmental subdivision thereof unless authorized by the governing bodies having jurisdiction over such property.

Parking is available at the following University areas on game days:

  • 17th and “R” garage – $25 day of game, $175 season
  • 19th and Vine garage – $25 day of game, $175 season
  • 14th and Avery Garage, limited space- $25 day of game, $175 season
  • 15th and Vine streets – $25
  • 1410 “Q” St. – $25
  • 16th and “X” streets – $25
  • 17th and Vine streets – $25 day of game, $175 season
  • Anderson Hall, 16th St. between “P” and “Q” streets – $25
  • Beadle Center, 19th St. north of “S” St. – $25
  • 519 N 19th Street between “S” and “U” streets – $25
  • 900 North 22nd St. – $20
  • 22nd and Vine streets – $20
  • 1700 “Y” St. – $25
  • 14th and Court streets – $10
  • 16th and Court streets – $10
  • 14th St. and Military Road – $10                                           

Wheelchair accessible parking is available for $25 per vehicle at UNL Lot 5, Stadium Drive and Salt Creek Roadway. Handicapped parking is available at:

  • 14th and “R” streets – $25
  • 14th and Avery garage – $25, with free cart shuttle
  • 14th and “U” streets, east of Morrill Hall – $25
  • 14th St. between Vine and “W” streets, free on-street parking where available

Several private lots are available.  Rates vary, and some offer season passes. 

Vehicles blocking driveways, parked too close to the intersection, parked on public right of way or interfering with vehicle or pedestrian traffic will be towed.  Vehicles will also be subject to towing if parked on job sites or driving lanes on streets or in unfinished areas.  Vehicles towed by order of the Police or a Parking Control Officer are subject to a $50 towing fine in addition to the $49.53 required to retrieve a vehicle from the impoundment lot.  The towing fine does not apply to cars towed from private lots.

BIG RED EXPRESS

In addition to its regular routes, StarTran will provide its Big Red Express service on Husker game days starting two hours before kickoff from six locations:

  • The City Municipal Service Center (I-80 airport, exit 399), 949 W. Bond (take first right north of McDonald’s) 
  • Southeast Community College, 88th and “O” streets, south parking lot
  • Holmes Lake, 70th Street and Normal, north end of lake
  • Gateway Mall, 61st and “O” streets, southeast parking area at Sears
  • SouthPointe Pavilions, 27th and Pine Lake Road, south of Von Maur
  • North Star High School (I-80 airport exit 403), 5801 N. 33rd St. (six blocks east of 27th Street and Folkways Blvd.)

Buses will drop off and depart from “R” Street between 12th and 14th streets.  The last bus will leave the lot 45 minutes prior to kickoff.  The cost is $5 each way, and exact change is required.  No bills larger than $20 will be accepted.  Electronic signs will help direct fans to the Big Red Express locations near the interstate.  Big Red Express season tickets, good for round-trip travel for all home games, are available for $50, a $20 savings, at StarTran, 710 “J” Street, or at the lots on game day.  Tickets also can be purchased via smart phone by texting “TOKEN” to 41411 to receive a download link.  For more information, call 402-476-1234 or visit startran.lincoln.ne.gov.

LINCOLN HISTORY LUNCH SERIES

Aging Partners invites senior citizens and the public to the Lincoln History Lunch Series at Gere Library, 2400 S. 56th St.  The presentations are from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., and highlight Lincoln’s history and evolution.  A sack lunch is available for a fee of $4 for age 60 and over, and an $8 fee for those under age 60.  Meal reservations must be made on the Monday prior to the program by calling 402-441-7158.  The schedule is as follows:

  • Wednesday, July 17 – “Lost Restaurants of Lincoln” with Jeff Korbelik, Lincoln Journal Star.  Lincoln has a history rich with delicious food and unique stories.  Long-time restaurant reviewer Korbelik remembers Lincoln’s most memorable eateries and shares his stories.
  • Wednesday, August 21 – “Historical Movie Theaters” with Ed Zimmer and Jim McKee.  Don’t miss this visual tour of Lincoln’s many historic theaters by two of Lincoln’s favorite historians.
  • Wednesday, September 18 – “John Johnson” with Ed Zimmer.  John Johnson was a Lincoln native, Lincoln High School graduate and University of Nebraska football player.  He also was a talented photographer who provides a unique view of early 20th century Lincoln, especially of Lincoln’s African-American community.

The Lincoln History Lunch Series is co-sponsored by Aging Partners and Lincoln City Libraries.  For more information on Aging Partners, visit aging.lincoln.ne.gov.

8 Epic Wine Tours You Need To Take In Nebraska This Year

Sponsored by Nebraska Wine Tours Posted in Nebraska June 14, 2016

It seems many people are under the impression that you need a balmy Mediterranean climate to produce the best wine grapes. Those people must not have had the opportunity to taste Nebraska wines. Although our climate is temperamental and our growing season is shorter than in, say, Bordeaux, Nebraska soil produces some exceptional grapes.

Our grapes aren’t the same as those grown in France, Italy, or even Napa Valley. The distinct taste of a wine comes from the soil, the air, the sun, and the water where the grapes are grown as well as the variety of grape. Nebraska wines reflect our state’s unique growing conditions. They are quite literally unlike any other wines you’ll ever taste.

The first commercial winery in Nebraska since Prohibition has been operating since 1994. In the intervening two decades, approximately 30 more have opened their doors to share the fruits of their vines. If you’re curious to try these uniquely delicious libations (and why wouldn’t you be?), these eight wine tours, organized by Nebraska Wine Tours, put Nebraska wines within easy reach.

Right-Click here to open.

May 2019 – FREE STOP THE BLEED CLASSES

Lincoln City Libraries will host four free Stop the Bleed training classes in May.  The courses coincide with Stop the Bleed Month, a nationwide campaign to highlight emergency first aid training.  Classes are limited to 20 participants each.  Call 401-441-8503 to register.   The training schedule is as follows:

  • Thursday, May 2, 6:30 p.m., Anderson Branch Library, 3635 Touzalin Avenue
  • Monday, May 6, 2 p.m., Eiseley Branch Library, 1530 Superior Street
  • Friday, May 17, 10:30 a.m., Walt Branch Library, 6701 S. 14th Street
  • Wednesday, May 22, 6:30 p.m., Gere Branch Library, 2400 S. 56th Street

According to the American College of Surgeons, citizen responders will almost always be first on the scene of an emergency medical situation, no matter how quickly professional emergency responders arrive.    Because an injured person can die from blood loss within minutes, those nearest to someone with life threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.

The training program is presented by the City of Lincoln Risk Management Division and Bryan Health.  Training is appropriate for teens and adults and lasts about an hour.

For information about Lincoln City Libraries and its resources, visit www.lincolnlibraries.org.   More information on Stop the Bleed is available at www.bleedingcontrol.org.

AGING PARTNERS EVENTS APRIL 8 THROUGH APRIL 14

SENIORS INVITED TO PARTICIPATE

Read this if you are a senior in Lincoln Nebraska.   Aging Partners invites senior citizens and the general public to attend a variety of senior-focused activities and classes in Lincoln and Lancaster County from April 8 through April 14:

Monday, April 8

  • Musical performance by The Clefs, Downtown Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Qigong Refresh and Recharge class, Cotner Center Condominium – 10 to 11 a.m.
  • BINGO, Firth Senior Center – 12:30 p.m.
  • 10-point Pitch, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Continuing 24 Form, Cotner Center Condominium – 1 to 1:30 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, Cotner Center Condominium – 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 3 to 4 p.m.

Tuesday, April 9

  • Learn to speak Spanish class, Downtown Senior Center – 9:30 a.m.
  • Chair Tai Chi, St. Paul United Methodist Church – 9:30 to 10:15 a.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, Auld Pavilion – 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, F Street Recreation Center – 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
  • Beginners 8 Form Tai Chi for Balance and Fall Prevention class, Auld Pavilion – 10:45 to 11:45 p.m.
  • 24 Form Tai Chi, F Street Recreation Center – 6 to 7 p.m.

Wednesday, April 10

  • Senior Walking Warriors, Hickman Senior Center – 9 to 9:30 a.m.
  • Senior Health Promotion UNMC Health Clinic, Vermeer Education Center – 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • Book Buddies, Downtown Senior Center – 9:30 a.m.
  • BINGO, Northeast Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Physical activity and exercise class, Asian Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • BINGO, Downtown Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • BINGO, JoAnn Maxey Senior Center – 11:30 a.m.
  • 10-Point Pitch and Bridge, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.
  • Chair Yoga, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 11

  • Qigong Refresh and Recharge class, Auld Pavilion – 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
  • Senior Health Promotion UNMC Health Clinic, Downtown Senior Center – 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • Writer’s workshop, Northeast Senior Center – 10 to 11 a.m.
  • Poetry reading and writer’s workshop with Carol Roland, Downtown Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • “Colorful Magic” with magician Bruce Jacoby, Bennet Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • Musical performance by Robert Patton and Nancy Vogt, Lake Street Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, F Street Recreation Center – 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
  • Musical performance by Mike McCracken and Pete Spotted Horse, Belmont Senior Center – 11 a.m.
  • Lincoln City Libraries Bookmobile visit, Lake Street Senior Center – noon to 1 p.m.
  • Stepping On – Building Confidence and Reducing Falls class, Eastmont Towers (Seasons) – 1 to 3 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
  • Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance, Eastridge Presbyterian Church – 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church gymnasium – 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
  • “Dinner and a Show” featuring Hillbilly Hal Cottrell, Cotner Center Condominium – dinner at 5:30 p.m., show at 6:30 p.m. (call 402-441-7158 by April 9 for reservations)

Friday, April 12

  • Musical performance by Mike McCracken, Northeast Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Chair Yoga, East Lincoln Christian Church – 11 a.m. to noon
  • 10-point Pitch, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.

Senior Center Meal Schedule (reservations required two working days in advance):

Belmont Senior Center (402-441-7990):  Monday, Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon

Bennet Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon

Downtown Senior Center (402-441-7154):  Monday – Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Firth Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Mondays at 11:30 a.m.

Hickman Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m.

JoAnn Maxey Senior Center (402-441-7849): Wednesdays and Fridays at noon

Lake Street Senior Center (402-441-7157):  Monday – Friday at 11:30 a.m.

Northeast Senior Center (402-441-7151):  Monday – Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Waverly Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Fridays at 11:30 a.m.

Location addresses:

Asian Senior Center, 144 N. 44th St.

Auld Pavilion, 1650 Memorial Drive

Belmont Senior Center, 1234 Judson St.

Bennet Senior Center, 970 Monroe St.

Cotner Center Condominium, 1540 N. Cotner Blvd.

Downtown Senior Center, 1005 “O” St.

East Lincoln Christian Church, 7001 Edenton Road

Eastmont Towers (Seasons), 6305 “O” St.

Eastridge Presbyterian Church, 1135 Eastridge Drive

F Street Recreation Center, 1225 “F” St.

Firth Senior Center, 311 Nemaha St.

Hickman Senior Center, 115 Locust St.

JoAnn Maxey Senior Center, 2032 “U” St.

Lake Street Senior Center, 2400 S. 11th St.

Northeast Senior Center, 6310 Platte Ave.

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church, 8550 Pioneers Blvd.

St. Paul United Methodist Church, 1144 “M” St.

Vermeer Education Center, 4000 S. 84th St.

Waverly Senior Center, 14410 Folkestone St.

For information on classes or to register, call 402-441-7575.  Roundtrip transportation is available for senior center meals and activities in Lincoln only by calling the centers directly (phone numbers listed in meal schedule).  For more information on senior center events and activities, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: My Center News) or call 402-441-7158

April 16 – Begin – Diabetes Self-Management Workshop

The Diabetes Self-Management Workshop is a six-week course for adults with diabetes, their family members and friends. At Hillcrest Firethorn Health Services 8601 Firethorn Lane Tuesdays, 1 to 3 p.m. April 16 through May 21

New six-week session!  Please register early. Classes that do not have sufficient enrollment will be canceled.  To register, call Aging Partners Health and Fitness Center at 402-441-7575.

Learn about diabetes including:

  • What to eat and when to exercise.
  • Monitoring your blood sugar.
  • Foot care.
  • Communicating with family and your health care provider.
  • Low and high blood sugar.
  • Tips for dealing with stress.
  • How to set small and achievable goals.
  • Overview of relaxation techniques.
  • How to increase your self-confidence.
  • Feel better and take charge.

This workshop is offered at no cost, but a suggested contribution of $4 per class is appreciated!

 

Lancaster – AGING PARTNERS HOST A MAGIC SHOW

Aging Partners invites seniors and the public to area senior centers in April for “Colorful Magic by Bruce,” featuring Lincoln magician Bruce Jacoby.  The schedule is as follows:

  • Monday, April 1 at 10:15 a.m., Downtown Senior Center, 1005 “O” St.
  • Thursday, April 11 at 10:30 a.m., Bennet Senior Center, 970 Monroe St. (located in the American Legion Hall).
  • Wednesday, April 17 at 10 a.m., Hickman Senior Center, 115 Locust St. (located in the Hickman Community Center).
  • Monday, April 22 at 10 a.m., Firth Senior Center, 311 Nemaha St. (located in the Firth Community Center).

Lunch will be served following all four events.  To make lunch reservations, call 402-416-7693 at least two days in advance.  The magic shows are free, but there is a $4 suggested contribution for lunch for those age 60 and over and an $8 fee for those under age 60.

More information on Aging Partners events and activities is available at at www.Aging.lincoln.ne.gov 

Lincoln NE – Saving Your Family Treasures workshops

Saving Your Family Treasures workshops are planned for March 29 and 31 at the University of Nebraska State Museum at Morrill Hall. Smithsonian experts will demonstrate how to handle, dry and clean damaged objects and share tips on personal safety, prioritization and preservation options. (Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative)

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION TO HOST WORKSHOPS ON SAVING HEIRLOOMS

Lincoln, Nebraska, March 26, 2019 – The University of Nebraska State Museum and History Nebraska are teaming up with the Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative to host workshops on how to preserve damaged personal heirlooms after natural disasters, such as recent flooding across the region. Workshops are 2 to 3:30 p.m. March 29 and 31 at Morrill Hall. The workshops are free and open to the public.

When homes are damaged and lives are upended, treasured keepsakes such as artwork, photos, personal papers and other family heirlooms become more cherished. Even in the aftermath of a disaster, these treasures may be salvageable.

 Individuals can attend one of the Saving Your Family Treasures workshops in person or via a video-conferencing session. Additional information will be provided to those who connect online.

Space is limited. Attendees are asked to register at https://go.unl.edu/treasuresworkshop.

 Smithsonian staff will be in Nebraska to provide the workshops. The Smithsonian is part of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force, a partnership of more than 40 national service organizations and federal agencies whose mission is to protect cultural heritage in states, tribes, territories and communities from the damaging effects of natural disasters and other emergencies.

 The workshops will include a formal presentation followed by a question-and-answer period. Smithsonian experts will demonstrate how to handle, dry and clean damaged objects and share tips on personal safety, prioritization and preservation options.

 Due to safety concerns, attendees are asked not to bring damaged objects to the workshop. If there are specific questions about personal heirlooms, attendees are encouraged to bring images of each item to discuss with the preservation experts.

 # # #

NEBRASKA TODAY: http://today.unl.edu

NEWS RELEASES: http://go.unl.edu/releases

EXPERTS SITE: http://news.unl.edu/experts

 

Feb – Transcontinental Railroad: The Railroads that Tamed the West

to be featured at Homestead National Monument of America Film Festival

2019 marks the 150th anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. This amazing transportation development shortened a cross country trip from months to mere days.  Transcontinental Railroad: The Railroads that Tamed the West, explores this undertaking initiated by Abraham Lincoln soon after the signing of the Homestead Act. The documentary touches on the innovations and dangers that accompanied this feat, as well as the complications and benefits faced by travelers and employees once the railroad was operational. This film will screen Saturday, February 9, and Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. in the Education Center at Homestead National Monument of America.
Join us for the “Innovation: Transportation During the Homestead Era Film Festival,” Saturdays and Sundays in January, February, and early March at 2:00 p.m., in the Homestead National Monument of America Education Center. This year features films that explore the Transcontinental Railroad and the Apollo Space program:

2 p.m. Saturday/Sunday February 9-10     The Railroad that Tamed the West
2 p.m. Saturday/Sunday February 16-17        Hidden Figures (PG)
2 p.m. Saturday/Sunday February 23-24        The West: The Grandest Empire Under God
2 p.m. Saturday/Sunday March 2-3                In the Shadow of the Moon

Remember, Homestead National Monument of America has an exciting schedule of events planned for 2019. Keep up with the latest information by following us on Twitter (HomesteadNM), Facebook (HomesteadNM), and Instagram (HomesteadNPS).

Homestead National Monument of America is a unit of the National Park Service located four miles west of Beatrice, Nebraska and 45 miles south of Lincoln. Hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free of charge. For additional information, please call 402-223-3514 or visit http://www.nps.gov/home/.

Lincoln 55+ and OLLI in 2007

Hello from the Lincoln 55+ Seniors Paper,

OLLI – Osher Life Long Learning – has been just a great success. In the last months of a 3 year grant, OLLI had 304 members with a long term goal of reaching 500 members. Meeting this goal would earn a $1 Million endowment to help educate Seniors in Lincoln NE..On March 1st, 2007, with publication of a 4 page, color ad in the spring issue of the Lincoln 55+ Senior Paper, our membership jumped in just 6 weeks to 447. After the next 4-page ad in the summer issue, we reached 537 – well beyond the “long-term goal.”  After the membership year ended, we dropped back to 440 members but surged forward again after the Fall 2007 ads – to 650 members. So – in 10 months, OLLI membership rose from 304 to 650. Wow. And yes! We did get that 1st $Million endowment.

OLLI board members carried 1200-1500 papers (of 12,000 total) to their friends and neighbors and doctors offices for each issue. Offering the 55+ Paper became a method for starting a conversation about OLLI.  The Lincoln 55+ is proud of the the 12 years relationship with OLLI. in 2018, we are over 1400 members and now have a second endowment in hand. A million here and an million there adds up.

OLLI Rocks.  https://olli.unl.edu/

http://lincoln55plus.com/

Lincoln – Oct 21 – ROBBER’S CAVE PRESENTATION SET FOR OCTOBER 21

 

Lincoln City Libraries invites the public to a free presentation Sunday, October 21 by Joel Green, the author of a new book, “Robber’s Cave:  Truths, Legends, Recollections.”  The program begins at 2 p.m. at the Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors on the third floor of the Bennett Martin Public Library, 136 S. 14th Street.  The program is part of the John H. Ames Reading Series, which showcases Nebraska authors reading their own works.
In his book, Green, a local teacher and Robber’s Cave tour guide, tracks the cave’s ownership through the past century and beyond.  The books is full of photographs and stories about those who have used the cave, including Native Americans, the Underground Railroad, Lincoln’s first brewery, Coxey’s Army, the Ku Klux Klan and possibly Jesse James.
The John H. Ames Reading Series is recorded by LNKTV City, the City’s government access channel (ALLO channel 2, Spectrum channel 1303 and Kinetic channel 1005).  A broadcast schedule is available at lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: LNKTV), and programs are available at YouTube.com/LNKTVcity.  Previous programs are also available for borrowing on DVD at Lincoln City Libraries.
For more information about Lincoln City Libraries, visit www.lincolnlibraries.org.

UNL Game Day Rules – 2018

Here it is Game Day Rules. Look for these:

  • clear-bag policy
  • Go Green for Big Red recycling program
  • gates open 
  • A free bike valet service
  • No Smoking at all of any kind – No vapors

MEMORIAL STADIUM POLICIES ANNOUNCED FOR 2018

Lincoln, Nebraska, Aug. 27, 2018 – A new, energy-efficient lighting system and upgraded window systems in the skybox suites will be the most noticeable changes for Cornhusker football fans as they enter Memorial Stadium Sept. 1 for the season opener vs. Akron.

Fans are reminded to arrive early and plan ahead to find an appropriate parking location, entrance gate, restroom, concession stand and postgame meeting place. Fans are urged to stay hydrated and to follow the instructions of security and safety officials.

Nebraska has implemented a clear-bag policy for all ticketed sporting events. Each attendee will be allowed to enter with one clear bag: either a plastic, vinyl or PVC bag that does not exceed 12 inches by 6 inches by 12 inches or a one-gallon plastic freezer bag (Ziploc or similar). Small clutches – approximately the size of a hand, with or without a handle or strap – can be taken into the stadium along with one of the clear bags. The clutch cannot be larger than 4.5 inches by 6.5 inches.

Exceptions will be made for approved medical needs. Medical bags or equipment can be inspected and tagged at Gates 11, 15 and 16A and at premium-level lobbies. For questions about medical equipment or other needs, contact the Nebraska Athletic Event Management Office at 402-472-1003.

All other purses and bags are prohibited. Guests carrying bags that do not meet the criteria will be asked to return them to their vehicles, hotel rooms or homes. Fans also may transfer their personal items into a provided, clear, Ziploc-style bag and discard the bag that does not meet the new guidelines.

Guests can carry personal items in their pockets or jackets. These include keys, makeup, feminine products, combs, phones, wallets and credit cards. Attendees also may bring blankets into the stadium by carrying them over a shoulder or arm. Guests who don’t have a bag can use the express entry lanes at Gates 2, 4, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 20.

For more information on the clear-bag policy, visit http://huskers.com/bagpolicy.

GAME DAY INFORMATION:

> Gates 1, 6, 8, 18, 19 and 21 will close shortly after kickoff. If a gate is closed, fans can use the next open gate to gain access into the stadium. Fans will be required to open outer garments for visual inspection upon entry.

> Tickets at all gates will be scanned with an optical reader for entry and re-entry. No entry is allowed after the start of the fourth quarter.

> Fans will again have the ability to utilize Memorial Stadium’s text-messaging service. For fan assistance, text to 69050 and start messages with UNLPD. Standard text-message rates will apply.

> Fans who are hearing-impaired can receive play calls, player information, referee announcements, promotions and emergency messages by following @HuskerCaption on Twitter. Those without Twitter-enabled devices can check out iPads at East and West Stadium Guest Services booths to take advantage of the program.

> University of Nebraska-Lincoln students will be seated in Sections 9 through 13B in the southeast corner of Memorial Stadium. All student seating is general admission. Students with tickets for East Stadium seating (Sections 9, 10 and 11) must pick up a required wristband at the tent east of Gate 23 beginning four hours prior to kickoff each game. When stadium gates open, students will enter Memorial Stadium through Gate 23. Wristbands are not required for students with tickets for South Stadium seating (Sections 12, 13A and 13B, entering through Gate 24). Student tickets are linked to students’ valid NCard, which will be scanned at the gate for admission. They must be scanned in and out like a regular ticket. Student ticket transfers may be done to other students enrolled at the university. All transfers are done electronically from ticket accounts at http://www.huskers.com. Student-to-student transfers go directly onto the transferee’s NCard at no charge. Tickets may be transferred one time to one person, so it is important that the original ticket holder send the invitation to the intended recipient, as it is not possible to transfer to a third party. Students may not transfer tickets to non-students.

> Fans are asked to help the Go Green for Big Red recycling program by depositing plastic bottles and cups in marked recycling bins near trash receptacles.

> Memorial Stadium gates open 90 minutes before kickoff, and ticket holders are encouraged to enter the gate number printed on tickets. Fans are encouraged to travel light when trying to gain entry to Memorial Stadium, as all fans and their belongings are subject to inspection at stadium entrances. Fans are encouraged to review the list of prohibited items at http://www.huskers.com/gameday. All prohibited items must be discarded at the gate or returned to a vehicle, hotel room or home.

> The Husker Nation Pavilion will be back for its 15th year, with most activities taking place on the Ed and Joyanne Gass practice field northeast of Memorial Stadium. It will open three hours prior to kickoff and provide free, family-friendly activities, games, music, autograph signings and appearances by current and former athletes across many sports.

> Stadium Drive on the west side of the stadium will also have food vendors and some game-related activities.

MEMORIAL STADIUM POLICIES:

> The Athletic Ticket Office will open four hours before kickoff except for 11 a.m. games, when it will open at 8 a.m.

> The Huskers Shop will open three to five hours before kickoff, depending on start time.

> Mobile tickets will be accepted; tickets can be stored on mobile devices and scanned at the gates. The mobile 2D barcode cannot be printed and scanned.

> Outside chairbacks are not allowed in Memorial Stadium. About 20,000 chairback seats will be available for rental at $5 each.

> Escalator and elevator access will be restricted to fans holding tickets to their respective areas in the premium level and the 600 East Stadium level.

> A free bike valet service will be provided at Cook Pavilion by Campus Recreation. For details, go to http://bike.unl.edu/bikevalet.

> The University of Nebraska–Lincoln prohibits the use of all smoking, tobacco and vaping products on its properties. For more information, visit https://www.unl.edu/tobacco-free-2018.

> The following items are prohibited in Memorial Stadium: guns, knives, bags that do not meet the clear-bag policy above, glass, cans, coolers, beverage containers, video cameras, open umbrellas and pets. At the discretion of game management, other items are subject to being prohibited. People will be asked to return prohibited items to their vehicles, hotel rooms or homes. Empty plastic water bottles are permitted but may be inspected. The use of selfie sticks inside Memorial Stadium is prohibited and may result in confiscation of the device if seen used. Camera use is permitted. For specific information, visit http://huskers.com/gameday.

> Food and beverages from approved game-day vendors selling on university grounds are allowed inside the stadium. All other outside food and beverages are prohibited. Certain situations may arise (e.g., extreme heat) that initiate exceptions to this policy. The university and the athletic department will communicate to the public if exceptions will be made.

> Alcoholic beverages of any type are not allowed in the stadium. In addition, consumption of alcohol is prohibited in city and university parking lots and property.

> The university does not permit the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) on or over the campus on football game days.

> Throwing of any object in the stadium is prohibited. Any person throwing any object is subject to immediate removal from the stadium. Rules allow game officials to penalize the home team if objects are thrown onto the playing field.

> Nebraska event staff or security personnel can help with any problems fans may encounter. If fans become separated from friends, they should report to any First Aid station or Guest Services booth for assistance.

> Lost-and-found areas are located in the Guest Relations and Security offices in both the East and West stadiums.

PARKING AND TRAFFIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES:

> Most parking lots on City Campus are reserved for those who have paid reservations on game days. Most lots surrounding the stadium have been converted to reserved stalls, with patrons assigned to specific numbered stalls. Paid public parking on City Campus is available at $25 per stall.

> Parking for people with disabilities is available for $25 per vehicle on a first-come, first-served basis in Booster Lots 5 and 9 on the south side of Salt Creek Roadway between Stadium Drive and 14th Street northeast of Memorial Stadium. Lots 5 and 9 have free cart-shuttle service to the stadium for mobility-impaired guests. This shuttle is radio-equipped and will run to and from the stadium before the game and beginning at the start of the fourth quarter. Contact the athletics ticket office at 402-472-3111 for pre-purchase opportunities. Charter and shuttle-bus parking is available on W Street between 14th and 16th streets.

> Parking lots will open at 6 a.m. for games with kickoff scheduled before 6 p.m.; for games that start at 6 p.m. or later, lots will open at 11 a.m. Lots at Haymarket Park will open at 6 a.m. for games with kickoff scheduled at 11 a.m; for all other kickoff times, these lots will open at 8 a.m.

> Stadium Drive, the street on the west side of the stadium, will be closed on game days.

> StarTran will offer the Big Red Express shuttle service to and from the stadium from sites around Lincoln. The cost is $5 each way or $10 round trip. Season passes are available for $60. For additional information, go to http://startran.lincoln.ne.gov or call 402-476-1234.

> Fan drop-off attempts around the stadium are prohibited. The recommended drop-off location is 12th and R streets. Uber, Lyft and taxi drop-offs and pickups will be at 14th and Vine streets. The 10th Street bridge is now open.

> Up-to-date statewide road information can be found at http://nebraskatransportation.org. Highway conditions and a brief weather report can be obtained by calling 511 on a landline or cell phone.

> Stadium Drive is closed from T to V streets beginning at 6 a.m. on game days. Access to Lots 1, 3, 4 and 6 are via T Street. No vehicles will have access to the southbound Ninth Street roundabout pre- and postgame.

Turn – Washington Spies

TURN: Washington's Spies I really enjoyed this. Turns out to be quite factual as to names, places, dates and events. I recommend the series.

Excuses to Cheat On your Diet

It’s Cheat Day: 10 Excuses Every Girl Makes So She Can Cheat On Her Diet

By 

Starting a diet is easy. For the first seven minutes, you feel wildly confident, motivated by the thought of you in a bikini and the admiring looks you will get.

Precisely 11 minutes later, you are hungry. You worked out, you tell yourself, so that gives you about 300 “free” calories.

You start thinking about food. You look at photos of food on Instagram. Soon, you are using your expert powers of self-persuasion to convince yourself a diet cheat is actually a good thing. It will boost your metabolism! And you’ll get right back on track straight after one little treat.

Woe is you. As all girls know, dieting is hard, boring and, worst of all, it’s often futile.

 

My Favorite?  -keith    “It’s free!”  I love free food (…) and have been to known to eat a day’s worth of food in free samples.

Read on for all 10 —> https://www.elitedaily.com/women/10-excuses-girls-give-cheat-diet/664898

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