Archive for the ‘Assistance’ Category

4 Secrets to Slow Aging: Keeping Seniors Active

Source: 4 Secrets to Slow Aging: Keeping Seniors Active

1. Socialization is Key

Click on the link above for details

2. Let’s Stay Physical! Physical!

3. Keeping That Society Life.

4. Keeping It Real

Daily household chores and responsibilities can be a lot for anyone.

 

FREE VIDEO PHONE SERVICE FOR DEAF

 

LINCOLN CITY LIBRARIES OFFERS FREE VIDEO PHONE SERVICE
FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING

Lincoln City Libraries now offers free video phone communication equipment for use by the deaf and hard of hearing at the Bennett Martin Public Library, 136 S. 14th Street.  It is the first public library in the state to offer the service.  The public may use the equipment from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, and from noon to 6 p.m. Sundays.   Library staff will also be available to demonstrate the equipment during those hours.
“Lincoln City Libraries appreciates the support of the Nebraska Commission for the Deaf and hard of Hearing (NCDHH) and Sorenson Communications in making this important service available,” said Library Director Pat Leach.  “We are proud to offer this added service to the community.”

“In Nebraska, about one percent of the population is deaf, nine percent is hard of hearing and more than 20 percent have some form of hearing loss,” said John Wyvill, NCDHH Executive Director.  “This equipment allows deaf or hard of hearing individuals to communicate with hearing people in real-time through a sign language interpreter.”  He said deaf or hard of hearing individuals can also call those with video phones and communicate directly.
The video phone enables Video Relay Service (VRS), a telecommunication service funded by the federal government’s Telecommunications Relay Service.
For information on the NCDHH, visit ncdhh.nebraska.gov.  For information on Lincoln City Libraries, visit lincolnlibraries.org.

 

Here are some reasons why Lincoln NEEDS a new Central Library. I think it is more than symbolic of the health of Lincoln NE. – Central Library Project | Lincoln City Libraries – Source: Central Library Project | Lincoln City Libraries

Lincoln Libraries to Assist with Job Searches

LINCOLN CITY LIBRARIES PROVIDES JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE

Lincoln City Libraries and the Prosper Lincoln invite the public to a series of programs to help people find jobs that lead to full-time careers. Volunteers trained by Prosper Lincoln will help job seekers find and correctly apply for positions online.  No registration or appointments are required.
The program is available at the following locations:
·        Bennett Martin Public Library, 136 S. 14th St. – Tuesdays, noon to 2 p.m. and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
·        Eiseley Branch Library, 1530 Superior Street – Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Prosper Lincoln is a shared community agenda focusing on improving early childhood, employment skills and innovation and entrepreneurship in Lincoln.
For information on the resources available at Lincoln City Libraries, visit lincolnlibraries.org.  For information about Prosper Lincoln, visit prosperlincoln.org.

2017 FARMERS MARKET COUPONS

LOW-INCOME SENIORS URGED TO APPLY
FOR FARMERS MARKET COUPONS

Qualifying residents – age 60 and over – in Lancaster County are encouraged to apply for coupons that can be exchanged for eligible foods at farmers markets, roadside stands and community-supported agriculture programs.  The coupons, available through the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP), are good for fruits, vegetables, honey and fresh-cut herbs.  The coupons will be distributed through a random drawing based on the number of coupons available for Lancaster County.
Gross income cannot exceed $22,311 for a single-person household or $30,044 for a two-person household.
Aging Partners has scheduled a series of application workshops for eligible seniors in May. All interested parties must apply at one of these workshops to be eligible for the random drawing:

  • Thursday, May 4: 9 a.m. to noon at the Lake Street Senior Center, 2400 S. 11th St. (located in the St. James United Methodist Church), Lincoln
  • Monday, May 15: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Downtown Senior Center, 1005 “O” St., Lincoln
  • Thursday, May 18: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Northeast Senior Center, 6310 Platte Ave., Lincoln
  • Friday, May 19: 10 a.m. to noon at the Waverly Senior Center, 14410 Folkestone St. (located in the First United Methodist Church), Waverly
  • Tuesday, May 23: 10 a.m. to noon at the Belmont Senior Center, 1234 Judson St. (located in the Belmont Recreation Center), Lincoln
  • Wednesday, May 24: 10 a.m. to noon at the Hickman Senior Center, 300 E. Third St. (located in the Hickman Presbyterian Church), Hickman
  • Friday, May 26: 10 a.m. to noon at the JoAnn Maxey Senior Center, 2032 “U” St. (located in the Malone Community Center), Lincoln

Gross income cannot exceed $22,311 for a single-person household or $30,044 for a two-person household.  The maximum benefit per household, per season is $48.  Residents may send someone to register on their behalf, providing the proxy brings a statement of permission as well as income and age documentation for the participant.

Coupons will be distributed to the selected recipients in early June, and are valid through October.  Participants must re-apply every year, and coupons are never guaranteed.  Selected applicants will be given information on how to pick up their coupons.  The SFMNP is administered by the Department of Agriculture in Nebraska.  Local Area Agencies on Aging are responsible for distributing the coupons.
More information on Aging Partners is available at aging.lincoln.ne.gov.

By June 30th – Apply for Nebraska Homestead Exemption

Source: Nebraska Homestead Exemption

QUALIFYING SENIORS URGED TO FILE FOR HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION

Lancaster County citizens age 65 and older who qualify for a homestead property tax exemption are encouraged to apply through the County Assessor’s Office by June 30.  Both the Assessor’s Office and Aging Partners can help answer questions about the program, which is designed to help older adults stay in their homes by providing partial or total property tax relief.  The exemption also is available to younger people with qualifying disabilities.
To qualify for a homestead exemption, at least one homeowner must meet these requirements:

  • Be 65 years of age or older before January 1 of the application year.
  • Own and occupy a homestead continuously from January 1 through August 15.
  • Meet household income limits.

The amount of the property tax relief available depends on the value of the home and the household income.  Medical and dental expenses are deducted to determine adjusted household income.  A couple could have a 2016 adjusted household income of $48,200 or less and receive some property tax relief, depending on the value of their home.
Individuals must apply for a homestead exemption every year to receive the benefit.  Homestead exemption forms are mailed by the County Assessor’s Office in February to those who applied for the exemption in the prior year.
For more information about the program, call Aging Partners at 402-441-7070 or the County Assessor’s Office at 402-441-7463.  Application forms are available from the County Assessor’s office at 555 S. 10th Street, room 102, or online at http://www.revenue.nebraska.gov (search for “homestead”).

More information on Aging Partners is available at aging.lincoln.ne.gov.  More information on the County Assessor’s Office is available at lancaster.ne.gov/assessor/.

AGING PARTNERS EVENTS APRIL 17 THROUGH 23

Aging Partners invites senior citizens and the general public to attend a variety of senior-focused activities and classes in Lincoln and Lancaster County from April 17 through April 23:
Monday, April 17

  • Contemporary Yoga, Cotner Center Condominium – 9 a.m.
  • Movement and Music class, Auld Recreation Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • Musical performance by The Clefs, Downtown Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • Tai Chi (Continuing 24 Form), Cotner Center Condominium – 10:30 a.m.
  • 10-point Pitch, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.
  • Dynamic Movement, Cotner Center Condominium – 2 p.m.
  • Stepping On fall prevention class, Savannah Pines – 2 p.m.


Tuesday, April 18

  • Stepping On fall prevention class, Madonna Pro Active – 9:30 a.m.
  • Chair Tai Chi, Aging Partners Health and Fitness Center – 9:45 a.m.
  • BINGO, Lake Street Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • BINGO, Belmont Senior Center – 11:30 a.m.
  • BINGO, Bennet Senior Center – 1 p.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church – 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 19

  • Blood pressure screenings by AseraCare Hospice nurses, Northeast Senior Center – 9 a.m.
  • Senior Health Promotion UNMC Health Clinic, Vermeer Education Center – 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • BINGO, Northeast Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Musical performance by Fine Wine, Lake Street Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Blood pressure screenings by Bryan nursing students, Lake Street Senior Center – 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • BINGO, Downtown Senior Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • BINGO, JoAnn Maxey Center – 11:30 a.m.
  • 10-Point Pitch and Bridge, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.
  • Chair Yoga class, Vermeer Education Center – 3 p.m.

Thursday, April 20

  • Beginners Tai Chi for Balance and Fall Prevention (Basic 8 Form), Auld Recreation Center – 9 a.m.
  • Downtown Senior Health Promotion UNMC Health Clinic, Downtown Senior Center – 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • “Surfing the Internet” introductory class, Northeast Senior Center – 9:30 a.m.
  • Movement and Music class, Auld Recreation Center – 10:30 a.m.
  • April birthday party musical performance by Pete Spotted Horse and Mike McCracken, Downtown Senior Center – 10:45 a.m.
  • Dynamic Movement class, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church – 3:30 p.m.

Friday, April 21

  • Stepping On fall prevention class, Waverly Senior Center – 9 a.m.
  • Traditional Tai Chi (24 Form), Auld Recreation Center – 9 a.m.
  • Musical performance by Countrified, Northeast Senior Center – 10 a.m.
  • Tai Chi (Continuing 24 Form), Auld Recreation Center – 10:15 a.m.
  • Transformative Power of Music class, JoAnn Maxey Senior Center – 11 a.m.
  • Chair Yoga class, East Lincoln Christian Church – 11 a.m.
  • 10-point Pitch, Northeast Senior Center – 12:30 to 3 p.m.

Senior Center Meal Schedule (reservations required two working days in advance):
Belmont Senior Center (402-441-7990):  Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11:30 a.m.
Bennet Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon
Downtown Senior Center (402-441-7154):  Monday – Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Firth Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Mondays at 11:30 a.m.
Hickman Senior Center (402-792-2006):  Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m.
JoAnn Maxey Senior Center (402-441-7849):  Wednesdays and Fridays at 11:30 a.m.
Lake Street Senior Center (402-441-7157):  Monday – Friday at 11:30 a.m.
Northeast Senior Center (402-441-7151):  Monday – Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Waverly Senior Center (402-416-7693):  Fridays at 11:30 a.m.
Location addresses:
Aging Partners Health and Fitness Center, 233 S. 10th St.
Auld Recreation Center, 1650 Memorial Dr.
Belmont Senior Center, 1234 Judson St.
Bennet Senior Center, 970 Monroe St.
Cotner Center Condominium, 1540 N. Cotner Blvd.
Downtown Senior Center, 1005 “O” St.
East Lincoln Christian Church, 7001 Edenton Road
Firth Senior Center, 311 Nemaha St.
Hickman Senior Center, 300 E. 3rd St.
JoAnn Maxey Senior Center, 2032 “U” St.
Lake Street Senior Center, 2400 S. 11th St.
Lincoln Community Playhouse, 2500 S. 56th St.
Madonna Pro Active, 7111 Stephanie Lane
Northeast Senior Center, 6310 Platte Ave.
Savannah Pines, 3900 Pine Lake Road
St. Mark’s United Methodist Church, 8550 Pioneers Blvd.
Vermeer Education Center, 4000 S. 84th St.
Waverly Senior Center, 14410 Folkestone St.
For information on classes or to register, call 402-441-7575.  Roundtrip transportation is available for senior center meals and activities in Lincoln only by calling the centers directly (phone numbers listed in meal schedule).  For more information on senior center events and activities, visit lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: My Center News) or call 402-441-7158.

Exceptional Caregivers Share Their Tips

Source: Exceptional Caregivers Share Their Tips

Posted On 06 Mar 2017 By : 

 A Place for Mom recently celebrated the stories of three exceptional caregivers: Carlen Maddux, Feylyn Lewis and Susan Hamilton. Although each of these caregivers had a very different and unique caregiving experience, they all shared similar tips about how caregivers can survive and triumph.Exceptional Caregivers Share Their Tips

Learn more from these exceptional caregivers, as they share their tips with us today.

Tips from Exceptional Caregivers

According to these exceptional caregivers, it’s important to practice these tips while caregiving:

1. Advocate. Wanting to help others doesn’t end when you’re no longer a caregiver. Caregivers Carlen Maddux, Feylyn Lewis and Susan Hamilton all get great satisfaction out of helping other caregivers, now that their caregiving role is over.

“Speak out where you can and when possible, share your story,” Lewis encourages.

2. Ask for help and support.

According to Lewis, one of the reasons she and her older brother didn’t seek out formal help and support when caring for her mom is because she “didn’t want to be a burden and didn’t want people worrying about her.”

As a 10-year-old child caregiver, she felt like no one would understand what she was going through. Now, as a leading researcher of young adult caregivers, Lewis knows that there are others out there in similar situations, and she is working to raise awareness and support for these caregivers.

3. Draw support from other caregivers, your family and friends.

For Maddux, who worked in an office during the day and cared for his wife at night, “even though I had help it was a tough road.” His children offered to give him one weekend a month off and he took it. He suggests that others caregivers reach out to family and friends and ask for short reprieves whenever possible. “I have a friend in Nashville who had a dozen friends work out a weekly schedule to help get his wife where she needed to be,” he says. “Tap into your friends for help.”

Social media is a great place to connect to other caregivers. Lewis and Hamilton suggest looking for caregiver forums, Facebook and messenger groups where you can vent in a safe space to other caregivers who understand.

4. Find local support.

For Hamilton, local support was critical when it came to caring for her mom. She leaned on the help of her local church and library groups, as well as larger organizations like the Alzheimer’s Society and A Place for Mom.

“Being a caregiver can be isolating and you can feel like you are all alone, it’s so important to make connections where you can,” Maddux says. He found support from his local church community who offered counselling and support. When Maddux’s adult children gave him a monthly reprieve from caregiving, he made use of a local monastery where he mediated, reflected and gathered his energy for the next month ahead.

5. Seek financial aid and advice.

Caregiving takes a huge financial toll, crossing economic situations and impacting families of all backgrounds and economic means. “There are many folks who can’t afford to care for their loved ones 24/7,” Maddux says.

Maddux was fortunate enough to find a local organization that helped subsidize home care for his wife, Martha, while he was at work. In addition to looking for subsidized programs, he advises caregivers to “invest in an elder care lawyer.” Maddux’s lawyer helped get him up to speed on Medicaid which covered some nursing home expenses for his wife when she was no longer able to remain at home. “I’d be flat broke if  I had to pay for that,” he says. “Don’t let caregiving destroy your financial well-being.”

6. Take care of yourself first.

All of our exceptional caregivers mentioned that self-care is easier said than done. It’s something that everyone tells caregivers to do, but in reality “self care is the last thing a caregiver has time for,” Hamilton says. “It’s so counter-intuitive, it’s a real challenge.” So, what can you do to take care of yourself if you don’t have time? “Give yourself a break and a healthy dose of reality,” Lewis advises. Caregivers are often over-critical and feel guilty when they can’t do it all. “If you don’t get it all done will there really be negative effects?” Lewis asks. Instead, she suggests that caregivers prioritize tasks and give themselves permission to not do it all.

Maddux found that keeping a journal was an important part of caring for his emotional well being. Not only did it help him keep track of research and information, it also helped him to vent and track his emotional journey. After Martha passed away, going through his journal became an important part of his grieving process.

7. Try not to isolate yourself.

There is a stigma associated with being a caregiver. This stigma leads many caregivers to hide their situation from friends and love ones, which leads to social isolation.

“Martha did not want to tell her parents, brothers and even our children about her diagnosis,” Maddux says of his wife. “It was very isolating.”

Are you an exceptional caregiver with other tips to share? We’d love to hear your suggestions and tips in the comments below.

Related Articles:

Exceptional Caregivers Share Their Tips posted by Kimberley Fowler

We Can Help! Our local advisors can help your family make a confident decision about senior living.

About the Author

Kimberley Fowler is a writer and editor dedicated to improving seniors’ lives through education, activism, volunteerism and community programs. Her other passions include yoga, literature, history, education and conservation. She is active in her local community and currently volunteers with the Hamilton Naturalists’ Club. Kimberley earned a Master of Arts in English Literature and Language from the University of Windsor, an Honours Bachelor of Arts from Wilfrid Laurier University and a Bachelor of Education from the University of Toronto. ViewKimberley’s website or connect with her on Twitter @kimsfow andLinkedIn.

 

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