Archive for the ‘55+ Seniors Paper’ Category

My Chew Bone

Written in 2009 while working on the www.lincoln55plus.com seniors paper.

From time to time, my wife and I take care of a neighbor’s Golden Retriever while his

Ma and Pa travel to visit family or go out on a golf weekend. Although I have no personal knowledge of Brodie’s breeding lineage, to me, he is pure gold. He has all the great traits need- ed to be nothing but loved. He always wants to be near us and sleeps in the bedroom all night. He sits on our feet to be in touch while we scratch his ears. Brodie gets along famously with our two dogs and even our cat. He is respectful of other’s pet food and he loves exploring our back yard. AND he loves his rawhide chew bones.

One chilly morning, I was fas- cinated to watch Brodie and our big ol’ yellow lab, Amy, laying in the grass, chewing on their respective rawhide. They faced each other as if at a dining table with their paws to the front and crossed to hold the bone in place. The chewing was intense and completely focused. There was a perfect harmony in their time together as they needed nothing but space and a little time to gnaw and chew.

I stood there for full 15 minutes wondering if either would break away from the task at hand to look for some other object of interest. Instead they remained dedicated to their work. During that time, I had several thoughts about what they were doing. I realized that chewing was good for their

P.1-16 Lincoln 55+

teeth but that was certainly not important to them. I assume the rawhide had a good flavor but decided that there was more to it.

Chewing on a bone must have an inherent challenge. The rawhide starts out stiff but begins to soften as they work on it. Then a tooth catches hold and progress is made, little bits at a time. The rawhide bones provides a push and a pull while the dogs try to transform it into – into – into what. Into nothing?

And then it dawned on me!

The Lincoln 55+ Seniors Paper is my personal rawhide bone. It has a form that starts out rather stiff but seems to offer up something – like clay that wants to be molded into a form. So I chew and I chew and it begins to soften. Soon, it begins to give off an essence that something is about to hap pen. Maybe a new ad will reach the right people and the businessman will report that the ad is paying for itself. Or the Lincoln Artist Guild will report a 25% increase in membership. Maybe a group like the Oscher Lifelong learning folks will double their membership and secure a million dollar endow- ment. This old bone has some pretty nice flavors.

So I chew and chew and once the paper has reached it highest state, I start to deliver them to all the businesses in Lincoln. This is a good flavor also as I visit with store owners. They report how well liked the paper is. And the people I see often claim they read the paper cover to cover. And some that I meet are potential advertisers or have a story to tell. All are more good flavors. And then the 15,000 papers are all gone – just like the chew bone. But I am left with great memories of the flavor and the challenges met and the wonderful thought of that next chew bone. Move over Brodie and Amy. I need some room at the table.

Lincoln 55+ and OLLI in 2007

Hello from the Lincoln 55+ Seniors Paper,

OLLI – Osher Life Long Learning – has been just a great success. In the last months of a 3 year grant, OLLI had 304 members with a long term goal of reaching 500 members. Meeting this goal would earn a $1 Million endowment to help educate Seniors in Lincoln NE..On March 1st, 2007, with publication of a 4 page, color ad in the spring issue of the Lincoln 55+ Senior Paper, our membership jumped in just 6 weeks to 447. After the next 4-page ad in the summer issue, we reached 537 – well beyond the “long-term goal.”  After the membership year ended, we dropped back to 440 members but surged forward again after the Fall 2007 ads – to 650 members. So – in 10 months, OLLI membership rose from 304 to 650. Wow. And yes! We did get that 1st $Million endowment.

OLLI board members carried 1200-1500 papers (of 12,000 total) to their friends and neighbors and doctors offices for each issue. Offering the 55+ Paper became a method for starting a conversation about OLLI.  The Lincoln 55+ is proud of the the 12 years relationship with OLLI. in 2018, we are over 1400 members and now have a second endowment in hand. A million here and an million there adds up.

OLLI Rocks.  https://olli.unl.edu/

http://lincoln55plus.com/

Racism in America by Keith N. Larsen

In 2011, I met an 80 year old black gentleman who was reading a story on Chief Standing Bear. I asked him for his thoughts and he said, ““I believe Racism is not a matter of Skin but a matter of Sin.” He explained further, “If I do not love – everyone – then I am not going – anywhere – with God.” His words moved me in a profound way. It is a rare and wonderful experience to find such personal resonance between belief and expression.
Chief Standing Bear was the first Indian to be recognized by the US courts as a person. We have to ask “What was he before this landmark trial? Not a man? Not a person?” Thankfully, his impossible situation was recognized by several people from Omaha who stepped forward to help correct a moral injustice. The story is told in Joe Starita’s book “I Am a Man.”
Imagine, if you will, a new group of people, blue colored people perhaps… Thousands of blue people, settling on existing Nebraska farms and displacing existing Nebraska farmers off their land. Imagine the laws are written to support these actions and troops are sent to enforce the law. They have to leave and move to Mexico!
As our friends are forced to walk to Mexico how do they feel? They have to establish a new home where the lands and language are totally different. Imagine their anguish! Imagine also that they are promised food and clothing and compensation – but it never comes. Now imagine it is not your friends but you and your family that must leave! This is what we did to the American Indians.
When a “country” sins against a race, it creates new laws and rules to rationalize its actions. America did not legally buy this great land with the Louisiana Purchase – we merely paid France to stop their own encroachment against the Indian people. With a fabricated piece of paper, American politicians and pioneers behaved as if we owned the West.
We took the land – rich land – resource filled land – land filled with rich soil, trees, gold and oil. We surveyed it, parceled it out, and gave it all to homesteaders and giant corporations. It would seem the Indians had no more rights than the wildlife.
Our proud heritage would have us believe our family homesteads were built out of nothing but pioneer blood, sweat, and tears. In general, the homesteaders acted in good faith within the laws of the time and we can’t blame any one person for settling on native lands. There seemed to be plenty for everyone. However, the sad truth is our law abiding ancestors lived in a world that used “White Man’s Law” to take everything from the American Indians.
Although we feel this ancient shame, most farmlands are not going to go back to the Indian tribes. We can’t take land away from the current owners and return it to the Indian tribes. This was a world where “Might made Right” and “White made Might.”
It is ironic to me that we blame other countries for the atrocities they commit but we are somehow able to overlook the misdeeds of our own country. There is a shame so deep it is impossible for us to look at our history with any hope of resolution.
Many unfair choices were made in the name of America’s Manifest Destiny. I think most people can agree our American industry craved the raw materials of this great land – we needed it to grow! It is my personal belief that no corporation and no government will be needed, or welcomed, in heaven.
In recent news, we find that Congress has passed a bill to provide $3.4 billion in compensation to the American Indians who were first robbed of their homes and then robbed of the resources that came from the scrabble lands left to them. This bill is not a welfare program for native Americans but a court ordered judgment of a class action suit filed in 1996. The claim was that our governmental officials mismanaged and stole as much as $100 billion from the resources harvested from Indian Lands.
Let’s be reminded that this bill to compensate the Indian Nations is a natural outcome of the trial of Chief Standing Bear. We find there are real treaties that are backed by the US Government. After the trial 1879, Native Americans were deemed to be real people who are to be protected by those laws.
There has been significant pressure to provide some form of justice. Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.) noted that a federal judge has held the federal government in contempt for not funding the Indian case and called it a “bargain for the American taxpayers” that will avoid tens of millions of dollars in court costs. “We are correcting historic wrongs that should never have occurred in the first place,” he said.
Even though congress can only offer cold cash in this settlement, I hope they are able to express personal sorrow in some meaningful way. In the material sense, we will always fall short.
Perhaps, a spiritual cleansing is something that we can offer. Maybe we have a chance to purify our thoughts and bring them into harmony with our actions. Perhaps our penance will be to speak up the next time a demeaning comment is made about someone. We may fall short from time to time but, like my mentor on racism, we can begin the journey needed to “Love Everyone.” Only when we are ready from the inside, can we ask the Indian Nations to forgive us.
Our kudos to Joe Starita and the work he has done to open our eyes with his book, “I am a Man.” We are grateful for the exposure offered by the Public Library’s “One Book, One Lincoln” program. Recently, we are hearing calls to expand our reach of “I am a Man” to “One Book, One Nebraska” and beyond. Maybe the next time we print a state coin, the proud image of Chief Standing Bear will be the one chosen.

Lincoln 55+ Web Blog nearing 30,000 reads

We now have 912 post on wordpress at http://www.lincoln55plus.org  

Nearing 30,000 hits All time 29,930 views

Help us reach more readers and share our posts. 

Senior Newspapers – nationwide.

If you have time, take a look at what other publishers are doing for Seniors. I hope the links are active. If not, go to the Source at: NAMPA – North America Mature Publishers Association

ALASKA
Senior Voice

ARIZONA
Lovin’ Life After 50

CALIFORNIA
Life After 50

COLORADO
Life After 50
BEACON Senior Newspaper

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
The DC Beacon

FLORIDA
Lifestyles After 50 – Tampa
Lifestyles After 50 – St Pete/Clearwater
Lifestyles After 50 – Ocala
Lifestyles After 50 – Sarasota
Lifestyles After 50 – Ft Myers
Senior Life Florida / Space Coast

ILLINOIS
Senior News 50 and Better
Mature Focus
PrimeLife Times

INDIANA
Senior Life of Indiana and Cinn., OH/KY 

KANSAS
The Active Age
The Best Times

KENTUCKY
Today’s Transitions

LOUISIANA
The Best of Times

MASSACHUSETTS
Fifty Plus Advocate
Prime Time Cape Cod
PRIME
South Shore Senior News

MARYLAND
The DC Beacon
The Baltimore Beacon
The Beacon – Howard County

MICHIGAN
Senior Perspectives

MINNESOTA
Good Age
The Senior Reporter

MISSOURI
Inside Columbia Prime

NEW MEXICO
Prime Time

NEW YORK
50 Plus Lifestyles
Forever Young

NORTH CAROLINA
Livin Out Loud

OHIO
Mature Living
Senior Life of Indiana and Cinn., OH/KY

ONTARIO – CANADA
Forever Young Information – Toronto
Forever Young Information – Hamilton

PENNSYLVANIA
50plus LIFE
Tri State Senior News

RHODE ISLAND
Senior Digest

TENNESSEE
Mature Lifestyles of Tennessee
The Best Times

UTAH
The Moab Star

VIRGINIA
Fifty Plus
Red Bird Times
The DC Beacon

WISCONSIN
50 Plus News Magazine

Source: NAMPA – North America Mature Publishers Association

POTENTIAL NEW CENTRAL LIBRARY in Lincoln

Lincoln City Libraries invites the public to two Town Hall meetings next week about a potential new central library in downtown Lincoln.   Library Director Pat Leach said the meetings are an opportunity for residents to share their suggestions for services and resources a new library might offer.   The meeting schedule is as follows:
·      Thursday, February 23rd, 6:30 p.m., Nebraska Educational Telecommunications Center (NET), 1800 North 33rd Street
·      Friday, February 24th, 12:10 p.m., Bennett Martin Public Library, 4th floor auditorium, 136 S. 14th Street

Godfrey’s Associates Inc. of Dallas, Texas in conjunction with HDR Inc. of Lincoln will show images of libraries from around the world and take questions and comments about current and future best practices in public libraries.  

In addition to the Town Halls, Leach will also host several community meetings the following week to seek further input.  The meeting schedule is as follows:
·      Monday, February 27, 4 to 5 p.m., Gere Branch Library, 2400 S. 56th Street
·      Tuesday, February 28, 5 to 6 p.m., Bennett Martin Public Library
·      Wednesday, March 1, 1 to 2 p.m., Eiseley Branch Library, 1530 Superior Street
·      Thursday, March 2, 6 to 7 p.m., Anderson Branch Library, 3635 Touzalin Avenue
·      Friday, March 3, 10 to 11 a.m., Walt Branch Library, 6701 S. 14th Street

For information about the central library project, visit lincolnlibraries.org.

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Keith Larsen

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